Five team stats about the Stanley Cup-winning Kings

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23.5% — The Kings’ power-play percentage in the postseason, ending a string of three consecutive Cup winners who struggled with the man advantage. (Chicago converted at just 11.4 percent last year; Los Angeles was at 12.8 percent the year before; and Boston was at 11.4 percent they year before that.) The 2014 Kings were particularly dangerous with the man advantage against Chicago in the Western Conference Final, when they went 6-for-19 against the ‘Hawks.

3.38 — Goals per game for the Kings, the most of any team in the playoffs. San Jose finished second, at 3.14; Chicago third, at 3.05. Which is notable, given the Kings, the NHL’s best defensive team during the regular season, played both those teams, allowing a good number of goals to the Sharks (22) and ‘Hawks (23) in their respective seven-game series.

83.3% — The Kings’ penalty kill in the 2014 postseason was decent, but not as effective as it was in 2012 (92.1%). They shut down the Rangers’ PP though, allowing just two goals on 22 New York tries.

1.29 — The Kings’ five-on-five scoring ratio. The highest of any playoff team this year, but lower than the 1.52 mark they put up in 2012, when, as previously noted, they didn’t have the power play going. L.A.’s five-on-five scoring ratio was the lowest for a champion since Chicago’s 1.22 mark in 2010.

In fact, the postseason team stats of the 2014 Kings and 2010 ‘Hawks were remarkably similar:

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+14 — The Kings’ third-period goal differential in the postseason. Scored 30, only allowed 16, making it by far their best period. In a related story, L.A. won four games — a quarter of its 16 postseason victories — that it trailed after two periods, including two against the Rangers. The last team to win four playoff games that it trailed after two was the 1999 Dallas Stars.