Five telling stats from the first round

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1. Colorado’s score-close Fenwick — 38.7 percent

By far the lowest of all 16 teams in the first round. In the regular season, the Buffalo Sabres finished 30th, and they were at 41.0%.

Look, a lot of Avalanche fans thought we were picking on their team when we asked if Colorado was in trouble after Game 3. Honestly, we weren’t. All we try to do here is call it like we see it. The Avs are an exciting young team with a bright future, but defensively they still have serious issues. Just look at the late tying goal the Wild scored last night:

That is not sound, structured hockey right there.

Again though, bright future. Just have some things to learn.

2. Anze Kopitar — 10 points

Tied for the most in the playoffs, with Paul Stastny, Nathan MacKinnon and Zach Parise. There’s a good chance Kopitar is going to win his first ever Selke Trophy this season, and deservedly so. He’s an elite two-way forward, right up there with Jonathan Toews and Patrice Bergeron.

This is a goal Kopitar scored in Game 6. Note how he started and finished the play:

3. Boston’s power play — 37.5 percent (six goals on 16 opportunities)

Hey, remember when the Bruins’ power play went 0-for-21 versus the Habs in 2011? And remember the disgruntlement in TD Garden during Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Final versus Vancouver when the B’s failed to score on Aaron Rome’s five-minute major for hitting Nathan Horton late? Boston won it all that year with a power play that converted on just 11.4 percent of its chances. Related: Torey Krug and Dougie Hamilton weren’t on that Bruins team.

4. Penguins’ record when they led after two periods — 1-2

Yep, both Pittsburgh losses to Columbus came after the Penguins carried a lead into the third. In all, teams went 28-7 in that situation during the first round, which isn’t all that great. Compare that to, say, the 2000 playoffs when teams went a combined 53-4, or 2004 when they went 67-6. When the Penguins won the Cup in 2009, they went a perfect 11-0.

 5. Frederik Andersen’s save percentage — .892

The only goalie with a sub-.900 save percentage to advance to the second round. In large part because Kari Lehtonen’s was even worse, .885, for Dallas. (Not a lot of great goaltending in that Ducks-Stars series.) Should be interesting to see if Bruce Boudreau goes back to Jonas Hiller against the Kings.