Daniel Sedin says he and Henrik got predictable: “We became easy to defend”

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Henrik and Daniel Sedin didn’t see their second-half struggles coming.

But according to the younger brother, the rest of the league did.

That’s the word out of Vancouver as Daniel spoke to The Province’s Gord McIntyre on Wednesday, trying to explain how the Canucks power play operated at 26 percent until January, when it started to struggle and eventually plummeted to 11 percent.

“We became easy to defend,” Daniel said. “Predictable, yeah. We tend to rely on each other a lot.”

Oddly enough, Daniel figures his concussion suffered after the Duncan Keith elbow helped he and his brother snap out of their funk. It meant the twins were apart for 12 games, not unlike the 18 game split two years ago when Daniel broke his foot and Henrik went on to win the Art Ross and Hart Trophies.

“He worked on his game two years ago and you could see the results, he became a different player,” Daniel said. “I think it was good we were apart for a bit and going forward, well, look at Henrik now – when he plays the way he did in the playoffs, he shoots more, he gets to those scoring areas.”

He’s got a point. Upon Daniel’s return in the opening round series against L.A., the Canucks power play — which up to that point had gone 0-for-14 — started clicking, scoring in the final three games of the series, going 3-for-7 overall.

Henrik scored two of the three, not bad considering he only scored eight during the regular season.