Dennis Wideman’s hat trick powers Capitals win

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I’ve developed the habit of calling Dennis Wideman a poor man’s Mike Green, but he accomplished something that high-scoring blueliner has never managed* on Friday night. Wideman scored his first career hat trick (along with an assist) as the Washington Capitals beat the Toronto Maple Leafs 4-2, drawing Dale Hunter’s coaching record to 3-3.

In a way, it was a night of good news accompanied by reality checks.

All four of Washington’s goals came on the power play (they went 4-for-6), which is the kind of explosiveness normally expected from this offense. On the other hand, it cannot be ignored that the Leafs sport one of the worst penalty kill units in the NHL.

Tomas Vokoun held an explosive Leafs offense to just two goals, yet he apparently gave one of his teammates “the stink eye” after one of the tallies.

Alex Ovechkin is starting to look more like his old, ever-dangerous self as he fired eight shots on goal, registered an assist and created some tantalizing chances. He didn’t find the net with any of them, though, and managed a -1 rating (which is actually quite forgivable since every Washington goal came on the man advantage).

Finally, there’s the big picture view. The Capitals won three out of their last four games, but those wins came against Ottawa (twice) and a struggling Toronto team. There’s nothing wrong with taking an uplifting feeling away from this game, but we’ll learn more about Washington when they face the Philadelphia Flyers on Tuesday.

Here’s video of Wideman’s hat trick. (Feel free to split hairs regarding whether or not that last goal should have gone to someone else.)

 

* Katie Carrera reveals that Sergei Gonchar was the last Caps D-man to score a hat trick. That happened on Jan. 4, 2000.

NBC Sports celebrates Hockey Day in America

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NBC Sports celebrates Hockey Day in America this Sunday with an NHL tripleheader on NBC and NBCSN, as well as a collection of stories and features which explore hockey’s impact and influence across the U.S.

Game one of the tripleheader features Henrik Lundqvist and the New York Rangers against Sidney Crosby and the Pittsburgh Penguins at 12:30 p.m. ET on NBC, followed by a Central Division battle between Vladimir Tarasenko and the St. Louis Blues vs. Zach Parise and the Minnesota Wild at 3:30 p.m. ET on NBC. 

Hockey Day in America coverage shifts to NBCSN at 6 p.m. ET, when Dylan Larkin and the Detroit Red Wings host Claude Giroux and the Philadelphia Flyers. 

NBC Hockey Day in America schedule
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh – NBC – 12:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
St. Louis at Minnesota – NBC – 3:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
Philadelphia at Detroit – NBCSN –  6 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Throughout Hockey Day in America on Sunday, NBC Sports will shine a light on various stories that celebrate the impact that hockey has had in the U.S. Feature stories that will air throughout the day include:

Team USA’s Shelley Looney – Shelley Looney scored the game-winning goal for the U.S. women’s hockey team in the gold medal game at the 1998 Nagano Olympics, which took place 21 years ago to the day of Hockey Day in America this Sunday. Looney persevered through dyslexia as a child to ultimately graduate from Northeastern University and make the ’98 Olympic Team. She now lives in Buffalo where she’s heavily involved in youth hockey and will coach the U.S. women’s team at the World University Games in Russia in March. Click here to watch a preview.

Charlie and Will Capalbo – Former Fairfield co-op high school goaltender Charlie Capalbo has been in a battle for his life the past two years. Charlie was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoblastic lymphoma in March 2017 shortly after the high school hockey season. Following treatments which helped put the cancer in remission, Charlie was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia. Luckily, Charlie is again in remission, and his younger brother Will Capalbo, also a goaltender with Fairfield, is a match for a bone-marrow transplant. NBC Sports details Charlie and his family’s courageous fight, and how the local community has rallied around the Capalbos to provide their support. Click here to watch a preview.

Detroit Ice Dreams – Led by inner-city Detroit native and former semi-pro player Jason McCrimmon, Detroit Ice Dreams is a nonprofit that aims to grow the sport of hockey in Hockeytown and minimizes barriers which prevent underrepresented communities access to the game. Click here to watch a preview.

Bill Parsley and The “Over 60” Hockey Club – Four mornings a week, the Quincy “Bald Eagles” – an over-60 hockey team of retirees and grandfathers – hit the ice, led by their senior-most member, 85-year-old goaltender Bill Parsley. Despite his injury history – a pair of detached biceps, a pair of hip replacements and surgeries on both shoulders – Parsley serves as an inspiration to his team and continues to flash the pads in net. Click here to watch a preview.

• The Hughes Brothers; America’s First Family of Hockey – No American family has ever had three players taken in the first round of the NHL Draft, but in the next few years, the Hughes brothers have a shot. Oldest brother Quinn Hughes was selected 7th overall in the 2018 draft by the Vancouver Canucks and currently plays college hockey at Michigan; Jack Hughes appears to be the consensus No. 1 overall pick in the upcoming 2019 NHL Draft and plays for the U.S. National Team Development Program; and youngest brother Luke Hughes is an up-and-coming defenseman for Little Caesars AAA U-15 team.

• Arizona State Sun Devils – For years, the Arizona State Sun Devils were known for their successful club hockey program. They finally launched a NCAA Division I program a few years ago, and after some difficult seasons, are in the midst of their most successful year in school history, currently ranked No. 12 in the country. The club is led by sophomore and Phoenix native Johnny Walker, who currently leads the NCAA in goals with 22, and head coach and ASU alum Greg Powers. The Sun Devils are on the verge of become the first independent school to make the NCAA tournament since 1992.

• Minnesota’s Blind Hockey Team – Minnesota Hockey and the Minnesota Wild have partnered this year to launch the Minnesota Wild Blind Hockey program, a new hockey program for players in Minnesota with visual impairments. Blind hockey, which is the newest discipline of disabled hockey, is the same exhilarating, fast-paced sport of hockey with minimal rule adaptations to make the game accessible for players who are all legally blind.

David Quinn and Mike Sullivan – The respective head coaches for the Rangers and Penguins in Game One of NBC Sports’ Hockey Day in America tripleheader will clash on Sunday, but share a similar path to their coaching roles. Quinn and Sullivan became friends as teammates at Boston University and discuss their relationship and New England roots.

Pre-game studio coverage begins at noon ET on NBC with NHL Live, which will be on-site in Hockeytown at The Rink at Campus Martius Park in downtown Detroit, Mich. Liam McHugh and Kathryn Tappen will anchor pre-game, intermission and post-game coverage throughout the day alongside analysts Mike Milbury, Keith Jones and Jeremy Roenick. In addition, Tappen will provide reports and interviews from the Team USA vs. Canada women’s hockey game at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit on Sunday afternoon.

High-schooler ‘sticks it to cancer’ with surprise comeback

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NBC Sports is celebrating Hockey Day in America with an NHL Sunday tripleheader on NBC and NBCSN, as well as a collection of stories and features which explore hockey’s impact and influence across the U.S.

It was standing room only in the rink, with those in attendance unaware of the surprise that was to be announced in a few moments. Derek Zacchino was lined up on the blue line in full uniform next to his Bethpage High School teammates prepared to take part in the ceremonial puck drop for a benefit game in his honor.

It had been a trying three months for the junior defenseman and his family. A surprise diagnosis after the first practice of the year changed the entire season. Now here he was inside the Town of Oyster Bay Ice Skating Center holding a secret that only few people there knew.

Hours before the benefit game Derek learned that partaking in the pre-game puck drop wouldn’t be his only on-ice duties that evening.

***

September 4 on Long Island was a hot one. Temperatures reached the 90s the day before many schools opened in the area. That Tuesday also marked the first day of practice for the Bethpage Eagles hockey team.

The 2018-19 season was to be one of transition for the Eagles. Despite losing the league’s top goaltender and scorer, and some of their top defensemen to graduation, they were hoping to build off last season’s run where they won their conference, reached the Nassau County final, and participated in the New York State tournament.

Derek left that first practice early feeling ill. He found himself experiencing double vision and ended up vomiting in the dressing room. Having experienced headaches over the summer, he chalked it up to being related to concussions he’d suffered in the past. One week and numerous tests later, he found himself on the way to Cohen Children’s Medical Center after doctors discovered a large mass.

“Sorry I couldn’t come to practice tonight, I had to go to the hospital. Turns out I have fluid on my brain,” was the text Derek wrote to Eagles head coach Jeff Schmier, who initially thought he was feeling dehydrated.

Doctors had found a tumor on Derek’s brain and were able to take most of it after emergency surgery the next day. After some tests, it was discovered the tumor was malignant and he was diagnosed with Glioblastoma, an “aggressive type of cancer that can occur in the brain or spinal cord,” according to the Mayo Clinic.

“[My wife and I] were just numb. I just thought life as I know it was ended,” said Derek’s dad, Don. “If something takes Derek away from me, I don’t see how I can ever be the same, let alone move on.”

But seeing Derek’s attitude after surgery and the diagnosis, especially as his concern focused on when he could play hockey again and not what he’s been through, helped Don and his wife Dawn deal with the situation.

“He never complained,” said Don. “He never showed sadness or [asked] ‘why me?’ That’s what carried us through. People ask me at work all the time, ‘How are you going through with this? You’re amazing.’ I’m not amazing. My son’s amazing. When I grow up, I want to be Derek. He was leading my wife and I in this journey of positivity. He never let us break down, because how could we? It doesn’t seem to be affecting him.”

Following the surgery, a schedule began that featured radiation treatments five times a week and a chemotherapy infusion every Monday. Derek still wanted to attend school, so treatments took place after classes ended for the day. His new challenge also didn’t keep him away from rink. He was still able to attend practices and games just to be around his teammates and help keep a sense of normalcy.

“It wasn’t too hard being away,” said Derek. “It was more tough not being able to play in the games.”

***

As Derek went through his cancer battle, the community rallied around the Zacchinos. Plans were made to turn Bethpage’s Dec. 19 game into a benefit for the hospital, which saw T-shirts featuring the slogan “Stick It To Cancer” sold in large quantities, as well as gift baskets and signed items donated by various NHL teams to be raffled off.

The night that was expected to raise only few hundred dollars ballooned into something bigger.

Once the crowd filed into packed rink, the atmosphere by those in attendance was likened to that of an NHL playoff game. Everyone was there to support Derek, but earlier in the day some surprise news changed the entire feel of the night.

As Derek sat down for his lunch period, Don called with the news that his doctors had cleared him to play that night. Now he had to go the rest of the day without revealing the secret.

When they arrived at the rink later that day, only Derek, his parents, Schmier, and the head coach of the opposing team, Oceanside High School, knew he was playing.

Derek arrived about 90 minutes before the game because he wanted to beat the crowd and say hello to everyone he needed to and then get ready. “I came in and I’ve never seen so many people in such a confined space,” he said. Schmier had arranged to have each team in the league have a representative in attendance, some of whom sent a number of players from their roster.

A former member of the Eagles’ team who now helps out assisted Derek in getting his equipment into the dressing room without anyone noticing. As Schmier did his usual pre-game pep talk, he emphasized to his players the importance of focusing on such a big night, especially as they were facing a 9-0-1 team. He finished by revealing the secret.

“One more thing,” Schmier said to his players. “I have some news that is going to rock your world. Like I say, defense wins it. We have someone that’s going to be joining us playing tonight and I need one of you players not to dress tonight. Talk about it amongst yourselves. Derek’s going to be playing tonight.”

From there the dressing room erupted in cheers, some players even broke down in tears at the news. It was a needed emotional boost for a team that was going through an up-and-down season.

Once the furor died down, Derek started getting ready, but kept getting interrupted by requests from local news stations for interviews. He didn’t really get to settle in until later on, and once he hit the ice he was running on adrenaline.

Still, while he took part in warmups in full uniform and all of his equipment on, no one in the crowd knew he would be playing. It was Dave Schneider, Bethpage superintendent of schools who made the announcement, which resulted in a roar from the crowd.

There was still a game to be played and the Eagles came out gave their best performance of the season, one that was capped by a strong defensive effort in the final moments.

As Bethpage held a 4-3 lead with under a minute to go and after some penalties, Oceanside found themselves with an empty net and a 5-on-3 advantage. 

“There’s no way I’m getting off this ice,” Derek told Schmier when asked if he wanted to stay on for the final shift.

A complete 60-minute effort wouldn’t be without some luck. As Oceanside pressed for the tying goal, their best chance clanked off the goal post with seconds remaining. The ensuing face off was tied up in the corner by Bethpage and time ran out with the Eagles immediately surrounding Derek in celebration.

“I have never been involved in a sporting event like that night. It was so emotional,” said Schmier, who still remains impressed at the level his team played at that night. “I’ve watched games since… I actually told them, I don’t ever want to hear that that team was better. I saw what you could do tonight, you have no more excuses because they were capable of that.”

Northwell Health

The game took place two days before Derek’s 17th birthday and the victory only added to a night that was a complete success. By the end, $21,016 (Derek wears No. 16) had been raised for pediatric cancer research at Cohen Children’s Medical Center.

“I don’t think anything really changed me,” said Derek of his cancer experience. “I learned that there’s a lot more good people out there than you think.”

Derek was unable to finish two other games the rest of the season, as the effects of his radiation treatments were too much for his body. His fight wasn’t over yet as there was a second surgery on Feb. 1. Another MRI in January showed doctors that part of the tumor that was left there originally did not go away and it had grown a little. The good news was that the surgeon was confident he could go in and get it, mainly because there was more room between the tumor and the brain than he originally expected.

Pro-active treatments are now being done to prevent the cancer from returning and eventually he’ll begin an oral chemotherapy treatment. The fatigue he experiences from the radiation treatments is expected to wear off by the end of the month and while they’re not focusing on it yet, he should be fully ready to return to the ice next season.

A week after the second surgery, Derek was a guest of New York Rangers defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk during his annual Kancer Jam fundraiser. The two connected thanks to a teacher at Bethpage High School and met after a game at Madison Square Garden in late December.

Shattenkirk wasn’t the only NHL player to reach out. Fellow Long Island native Charlie McAvoy of the Boston Bruins sent a signed jersey, as did Alex Tuch, who got his Vegas Golden Knights teammates to autograph one for Derek.

***

Through this experience, nothing phased Derek. While his family were concerned about his health, he never complained about what he was going through. His only concern was when he’d be able to play hockey again.

“I don’t even think it’s still hit me,” said Derek, who was named after Boston Bruins great Derek Sanderson even though Don is a die-hard Rangers fan. “When I found out that my last surgery went well, as the doctor said, in remission as of right now. I never really freaked out. So I don’t think it’s even hit me that I was diagnosed with it yet, let alone healed.”

“He was never high and low,” said Don. “He’s Derek. This is Derek.”

That was never more evident as the four of us sat for an interview last week and Schmier casually broke the news to Derek that he would be the team’s captain next season.

“I guessed my senior season year would be our best season,” said Derek. “That’s what I’m hoping.”

The Eagles will only graduate four seniors in June, which means the 2019-20 season will feature an upperclassmen-heavy roster. That will be a team led by a motivated captain who has conquered the ultimate obstacle.

“I didn’t know until this happened, the magnitude of [nothing phasing Derek] and really how impressed I am,” said Don. “Looking back, this is Derek’s personality. The strength and the poise, this is a whole other thing.

“Like I say, when I grow up I want to be him.”

Pre-game studio coverage begins at noon ET on NBC with NHL Live, which will be on-site in Hockeytown at The Rink at Campus Martius Park in downtown Detroit, Mich. Liam McHugh and Kathryn Tappen will anchor pre-game, intermission and post-game coverage throughout the day alongside analysts Mike Milbury, Keith Jones and Jeremy Roenick. In addition, Tappen will provide reports and interviews from the Team USA vs. Canada women’s hockey game at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit on Sunday afternoon.

NBC Hockey Day in America schedule:
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh – NBC – 12:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
St. Louis at Minnesota – NBC – 3:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
Philadelphia at Detroit – NBCSN –  6 p.m. ET (Watch live)

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Detroit Ice Dreams embodies ‘hockey is for everyone’

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“Hockey Day in America” isn’t just a celebration of the sport at the highest, NHL level. It’s also about how the sport is growing in the U.S., making it more accessible in more ways than one.

One of the best examples can be seen with Jason McCrimmon’s Detroit Ice Dreams Youth Hockey Association, which you can learn more about in the fantastic video above. It’s one thing to say that hockey is for everyone, but people like McCrimmon are putting in the work to make such dreams a reality.

NBC Sports is celebrating Hockey Day in America with an NHL Sunday tripleheader on NBC and NBCSN, as well as a collection of stories and features which explore hockey’s impact and influence across the U.S.

Pre-game studio coverage begins at noon ET on NBC with NHL Live, which will be on-site in Hockeytown at The Rink at Campus Martius Park in downtown Detroit, Mich. Liam McHugh and Kathryn Tappen will anchor pre-game, intermission and post-game coverage throughout the day alongside analysts Mike Milbury, Keith Jones and Jeremy Roenick. In addition, Tappen will provide reports and interviews from the Team USA vs. Canada women’s hockey game at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit on Sunday afternoon.

NBC Hockey Day in America schedule:
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh – NBC – 12:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
St. Louis at Minnesota – NBC – 3:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
Philadelphia at Detroit – NBCSN –  6 p.m. ET (Watch live)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Capalbo Strong: Brothers battle cancer together

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After what was expected to be a routine checkup, Charlie Capalbo learned that he had cancer. As devastating as that was, he eventually learned that he had a 90-percent match for a crucial bone marrow transplant — his younger brother, Will.

The above video goes into detail on the heartbreaking and heartwarming story of “Capalbo Strong,” including the extremely touching, “Dude!”-heavy moment when Will realized he was a match.

Here’s hoping that Charlie returns to full health soon.

This post also goes into more detail regarding the Capalbo brothers’ story.

NBC Sports is celebrating Hockey Day in America with an NHL Sunday tripleheader on NBC and NBCSN, as well as a collection of stories and features which explore hockey’s impact and influence across the U.S.

Pre-game studio coverage begins at noon ET on NBC with NHL Live, which will be on-site in Hockeytown at The Rink at Campus Martius Park in downtown Detroit, Mich. Liam McHugh and Kathryn Tappen will anchor pre-game, intermission and post-game coverage throughout the day alongside analysts Mike Milbury, Keith Jones and Jeremy Roenick. In addition, Tappen will provide reports and interviews from the Team USA vs. Canada women’s hockey game at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit on Sunday afternoon.

NBC Hockey Day in America schedule:
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh – NBC – 12:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
St. Louis at Minnesota – NBC – 3:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
Philadelphia at Detroit – NBCSN –  6 p.m. ET (Watch live)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Jack, Luke, and Quinn Hughes grow up together with hockey

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With Quinn Hughes going seventh overall – and already seeming like a steal – for the Vancouver Canucks in 2018, and Jack ranking as the consensus pick for first overall in the next draft, the Hughes family feels like a factory for high-end talent. There’s even a younger Hughes brother named Luke.

As great as it is going to be to see the Hughes brothers tear up the NHL, it’s really something to see all of the family footage of the trio growing up. They’re playing hockey indoors and outdoors, and there’s even an adorable baby/kids in hockey gear photo. It’s truly great stuff.

Enjoy the video above of these promising Hughes kids, and their loving parents. As Luke notes, they’re best friends.

NBC Sports is celebrating Hockey Day in America with an NHL Sunday tripleheader on NBC and NBCSN, as well as a collection of stories and features which explore hockey’s impact and influence across the U.S.

Pre-game studio coverage begins at noon ET on NBC with NHL Live, which will be on-site in Hockeytown at The Rink at Campus Martius Park in downtown Detroit, Mich. Liam McHugh and Kathryn Tappen will anchor pre-game, intermission and post-game coverage throughout the day alongside analysts Mike Milbury, Keith Jones and Jeremy Roenick. In addition, Tappen will provide reports and interviews from the Team USA vs. Canada women’s hockey game at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit on Sunday afternoon.

NBC Hockey Day in America schedule:
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh – NBC – 12:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
St. Louis at Minnesota – NBC – 3:30 p.m. ET (Watch live)
Philadelphia at Detroit – NBCSN –  6 p.m. ET (Watch live)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.