Some Stats: Chicago might have goaltending concerns

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Some Stats is a weekly feature that will run every Thursday on PHT. In Some Stats, we look at some stats.

.894 – The combined save percentage for Chicago goalies Corey Crawford and Ray Emery. Which if you’re not familiar with goalie stats, isn’t very good. And while a lot of the duo’s struggles has to do with the Blackhawks surrendering too many prime scoring chances, Crawford’s admitted he needs to be better. The 26-year-old was rewarded with a three-year, $8-million deal in May after an outstanding playoff performance against the Canucks. However, he’s still short on NHL experience, having started fewer than 100 games. If Chicago doesn’t get more consistent goaltending before the trade deadline, GM Stan Bowman might have to make a move.

20 – Assists for Daniel Sedin, the second most in the NHL behind Ottawa defenseman Erik Karlsson (21), and four more than twin brother, Henrik. Noteworthy, since Henrik has always been known as the set-up man and Daniel the finisher. Along those lines, Henrik also has more goals (8) than Daniel (7). It’s almost like they switched jerseys for a laugh. “Hey, we should switch jerseys, too,” Roberto Luongo said to Cory Schneider.

2 – Power-play goals for Steven Stamkos. Yep, that’s it. The Lightning sniper still managed to score 10 times in November and is currently tied with Phil Kessel for most goals, each player with 16. Stamkos had 17 PP goals last season, second to only Daniel Sedin’s 18.

0 – Number of 5-on-3 opportunities for the Dallas Stars, the only team that’s gone without one. The Vancouver Canucks, meanwhile, lead the league with 8:24 of two-man advantage time. But that’s only because the NHL is out to get the Canucks. The refs are just buttering them up during the regular season so they can pull the rug out from under them in the playoffs. It’s so obvious.

1.31 – Goals-against average for Blues netminder Brian Elliott, the lowest in the NHL. You know, I have to admit I was surprised to learn Elliott is only 26. I would’ve wagered older. Probably because he’s already played for three NHL teams – he’s got that journeyman feel to him. Is it possible he’s just coming into his own now? Elliott’s spent most of his career on bad teams. He started in Ottawa when the Sens’ window was closing and he spent last season in Colorado.