Both the Lightning and Bruins have a lot to work on going into Game 3

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A chronic optimist can find reasons for positivity for the Boston Bruins and Tampa Bay Lightning after Boston’s 6-5 win in Game 2. The Bruins’ perspective is fairly obvious: they tied the series up and witnessed a possible breakthrough night for their talented but struggling rookie Tyler Seguin. It doesn’t take much to find a silver lining for Tampa Bay, either. Ultimately, they earned one win on the road and ended Game 2 with some momentum.

Yet a realist will point out that each team has plenty to work on. Let’s take a look at some of the issues plaguing both teams as the series shifts to Tampa Bay.

Bruins won, but shouldn’t get fat and happy.

Yes, Boston tied things up and looked dominant at times, but there was a lot to worry about. If you ask me, the Lightning’s advantage in foot speed has been painfully apparent at times. Tampa Bay produced a disturbing array of semi-breakaways and full-fledged ones, but Tim Thomas was able to bail his team out on most (if not all) of them. Just watch this montage to see how different this game could have been.

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Making big saves like that is what separates the unorthodox Thomas from mere mortals. Still, how many times can Zdeno Chara and lesser Bruins defensemen find themselves flat-footed without dire results? I’m a fan of Dennis “Pain Sponge” Seidenberg, but not enough to justify the 31 minutes of ice time he received in Game 2.

Overall, leaky defense is the biggest concern for the Bruins. They barely managed to hold onto a 6-3 lead in the third period, requiring a desperate Thomas save on a Marc-Andre Bergeron rebound shot to seal things up. After dominating the first, Boston allowed Tampa Bay to out-shoot them 30-17 in the last two periods. They can’t expect Thomas to save them over the long haul, not with Tampa Bay’s talent at the forward position.

Thomas was a big reason why the Bruins won, but he allowed a goal or two he regretted in this game. Perhaps the most stoppable one came when Vincent Lecavalier beat him five-hole to score Tampa Bay’s third goal. In a tighter game, a regrettable goal would be a lot more damaging for Thomas and the Bruins.

Still, the Bruins feel a lot better about life tonight than they did on Saturday night.

Tampa Bay should be concerned, too.

Like I mentioned previously, the Lightning can take some positives into Game 3. They “earned home ice advantage” by winning on of the two games in Boston and put a lot of heat on the Bruins in the third period. They also received goals from star players after winning Game 1 thanks to support players.

That being said, it’s easy to wonder if the Lightning are running out of luck. As I pointed out in PHT’s preview post, the Lightning have been severely out-shot through the first two rounds.

That trend was tolerable when Dwayne Roloson was standing on his head, but he allowed six goals in two periods before getting the hook for Mike Smith in the third period. Many of those tallies weren’t really his fault, but one must wonder if Roloson’s improbable run hit a wall of reality. The Lightning might not need superlative goaltending from Roloson every night, but if he regresses to the point of being average, Tampa Bay could be in trouble.

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Every NHL team sports some warts, even one that manages to make the final four in the playoffs. Still, the Bruins and Lightning have some major concerns, especially in their own end. Whichever team adjusts and improves will likely find their way to the Stanley Cup finals.

Considering their competition in the West, they better work out the kinks by then.