What Went Wrong: Pittsburgh Penguins

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Of all the first round exits, the Penguins might have the most easily diagnosed reason why they’re bowing out of the playoffs early. When looking over their numbers after being taken out in seven games, while one reason why they’re toast is obvious there are others lurking below the surface that help explain their early entrance to the offseason.

If you think everything centers around not having Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin around, you’re missing the mark. What went wrong for the Penguins? Let us count the ways.

1. Powerless power play
Let’s just get this out of the way first. The Penguins power play was abysmal. While the Bruins’ power play in these playoffs was technically worse since they didn’t score any goals in 21 chances, the Penguins power play may have cost them the series. Scoring at a 2.2% clip and going 1-35 in the series is awful. They had no cohesion, no real flow, nothing creative going on at all. They stunk.

In a series that demanded teams to find a way to score goals, the Pens had ample opportunity to put pucks in the net through the series (58:51 to be exact) and potted just one goal. That’s not getting it done for any team. When you’ve gotten nearly a full game’s worth of power play time over a seven game series you have to score more. We know all about how they didn’t have Crosby and Malkin and that’s fine, but adjustments have to be made especially since they spent half the season without those two. Give credit to Tampa Bay’s penalty kill for being tough, but at some point you’d think the law of averages had to give in and it never did.

2. Matt Cooke was sorely missed
Crazy thought right? Not so much when you consider how important Cooke was to the Pens penalty kill this season. For all of Cooke’s bad parts to his game, he’s a tremendous penalty killer for them. With Cooke out for the series thanks to his suspension, the Lightning were able to make a nice living on the power play going 8-27 in the series (29.6%). Half of those goals came in Game 5 that saw Tampa Bay win 8-2, but the point was hammered home that if Pittsburgh took penalties they were instantly playing with fire.

While the Pens would run the risk of giving up a few more power play opportunities with Cooke running around and doing his thing on the ice, his role on the PK was vital for them. Without him there the Lightning ran wild. With such a special teams advantage for Tampa Bay on both sides of the ledger, they were able to eke things out.

3. Offensive frustration personified
The Pens offense averaged two goals per game. That’s asking a lot out of Marc-Andre Fleury to be flawless. The Pens offense, instead, managed to not even be able to hit the net. Pittsburgh was second in the playoffs in missed shots with 108. Making matters tougher on them, the Lightning blocked a playoff best 145 shots. With guys either getting in their way or the Penguins missing the net entirely, it’s not shocking they had such a hard time scoring. When the shots did get through, Dwayne Roloson was there waiting to stop them. The Penguins led all teams in the playoffs through the first round with 257 shots on goal.

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We all know what the Penguins were missing in the playoffs this year. They were without two of the premiere offensive weapons in the NHL and they were also without their best penalty killer. Provided all things go well next season, they’ll have all of them back as they challenge for the Stanley Cup once again.

Dan Bylsma proved himself to be one of the best coaches in the NHL after juggling knives the way he did this season with injuries. The series loss stings, but if Crosby and Malkin needed further motivation to bounce back in a huge way next season, they’ve got it now.

Flyers re-sign Elliott for one year

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Another day, another roster transaction for the Philadelphia Flyers.

The team announced on Wednesday afternoon that it has signed veteran goalie Brian Elliott to a one-year contract, keeping him in Philadelphia for another season.

He will make $2 million during the 2019-20 season.

“Brian has played well for us the last two seasons,” said general manager Chuck Fletcher in a statement released by the team. “He is a proven, quality goaltender who competes and battles hard every time he has the net. We are excited to have him rejoin our team.”

The expectation here is that Elliott will serve as the top backup to Carter Hart who looks poised to take over as the team’s No. 1 goalie and, hopefully, bring some consistency to a position that has plagued the Flyers organization for decades.

Elliott spent the past two seasons with the Flyers and is coming off of a 2018-19 season that saw him record a .909 save percentage in 26 appearances. He was one of eight goalies to appear in a game for the team this past season, an absurd number even for a team like the Flyers that is always burning through goalies at a ridiculous rate.

The team had also reportedly been interesting in re-signing Cam Talbot, acquired at the trade deadline in a trade with the Edmonton Oilers, but with Elliott back in the mix it would seem as if Talbot will be headed to the open market as an unrestricted free agent.

Elliott’s career has been all over the map with some individual seasons that have placed him near the top of the league, and other seasons where he has badly struggled. At 34 his days as a starter are probably behind him, but if all goes according to plan with Hart the Flyers won’t need him to be anything more than a capable backup.

Related: Flyers’ Fletcher continues to be the anti-Hextall

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Devils eager for offseason splashes to help deliver wins

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VANCOUVER — The New Jersey Devils entered the off-season with one marketing plan. After April 9, the night they won the NHL draft lottery, those plans changed. Two and a half months later, the morning after they selected Jack Hughes with the No. 1 overall pick, they acquired P.K. Subban in a trade with the Nashville Predators. Those plans changed once again.

“The news over the last 24 hours will challenge our marketing and content team and everyone else to ramp it up,” Devils president Hugh Weber told NBC Sports during draft weekend in Vancouver. “But we’ve been preparing behind the scenes, adding resources and getting things in place preparing for success, preparing for more demand. The team will be ready. What that actually looks like in terms of campaigns and all that other stuff, I’m not sure yet. Ray’s not done yet.”

Weber was the first person in the organization to know that the franchise had won the lottery and the right to make the first overall selection. The lottery process played out behind closed doors hours 90 minutes before the television broadcast announced the results. There, Weber and the other NHL team representatives were sequestered watching as the ping pong balls were pulled and the unique combinations were drawn. 

Through the excitement of knowing the Devils would be picking first, Weber couldn’t share in that joy as the reps were forbidden from leaving the room until the broadcast ended and he certainly was going to withhold his exuberance in front of the teams that lost out on the top spot.

Once the lottery knew became public, Devils fans were eager to look toward the 2019-20 NHL season. Post-lottery, the franchise moved into the top 10 in the league in new ticket sales. After drafting Hughes and later acquiring Subban, they had sales staff working to capitalize on the excitement.

“I haven’t gotten numbers but there’s been a lot of activity and I think you’re going to see in a week’s time we anticipate an acceleration of not only people who were on the fence that didn’t renew yet, were kind of waiting to see, but also those that have been with us over a long time who said, ‘OK, I get it now, you guys are using that cap space just as you said you would and let’s get after it,'” Weber said.

[MORE: Jack Hughes and the impact of USA Hockey]

While they’ve had time to prepare a plan for introducing Hughes to the market, Subban is his own marketing team. With over one million Twitter followers and 900,000-plus more on Instagram, his personality and work in the community will help sell the Devils.

The additions of Hughes and Subban not only upped the excitement levels in the Devils’ fan base, but the New York Rangers’ acquiring Jacob Trouba and drafting Kaapo Kakko second overall revived a rivalry between the two franchises. The Devils have long been on the outside in a crowded New York metropolitan market and they’re hoping this past weekend, plus whatever happens during the free agency period, will allow them to gain ground on their regional rivals.

“When hockey is competitive and the rivalries are strong in New York, I think it’s good for the NHL,” said Weber. “The Islanders are no slouches, they have a good core coming. You’ve got Lou [Lamoriello] and you’ve got the Rangers and us, even the Flyers now with [GM] Chuck Fletcher, there’s some good narratives happening in and around the Metropolitan, and we’re glad. If you stack up the teams in the East, it’s going to be tough. It’s going to be a very competitive conference. I think that’s just going to push us all. But generally, those types of rivalries, those types of stories are good for business.”

The Devils missed the playoffs last season coming off a surprising 2017-18 campaign that saw them play postseason hockey for the first time since 2012. Last season wasn’t necessarily a step back in Weber’s eyes. He viewed the playoff year as playing with “house money” and, according to their plan, the franchise is ahead of schedule.

“We never saw this as a linear progression,” Weber said. “We looked at are we making progress, are our prospects and our pipeline making progress, are they developing a team, does [head coach] John Hynes have a foothold on the culture here, is there a plan that we can continue working at? The answer was yes, which is why we extended Ray [Shero], we extended John, we extended the coaching staff, we extended virtually everybody on the hockey staff because this part of a linear, longer plan. We believe that patience in sports is one of the great arbitrage because too often teams and/or partners and owners get too impatient and want to make a change just for change’s sake. 

“I wouldn’t say the lottery pick did anything more than to say it kind of accelerated a little bit because when you have the potential of the fifth or sixth pick, you might not see that player on your roster for a few more years, where now you have an impact player, an elite player that’s going to potentially contribute right off the bat. It helped us accelerate our plans and put things in place, not to rush anything. We’ve said over and over again there are no shortcuts to the top. There are shortcuts to the middle, but we don’t want to be in the middle.”

Keeping stability in the organization is key to the Devils in seeing progress. They believe that Hynes has helped create an identity for his team and that despite a playoff-less season, he kept them competitive through the end of the 82-game schedule. When Shero was hired in 2015 he made it a goal to ensure the franchise was respected again. A draft weekend splash certainly got people talking and excited about the on-ice product for next season. There’s still the Taylor Hall extension to take care of and then more work to be done when free agency opens, but the organization sees itself on the right track. But in the end the results will speak for themselves.

“In terms of fans and how fans have seen us, we have to earn that and it’s going to take some time to have the consistency,” Weber said. “Now moves like we did [this weekend], those are big splashes and they’re great stories, but unfortunately great stories don’t win games. It’s going to come down to team performance. We’ve been bullish, even without the additions that we’ve had, is that to see the progression of these prospects coming up and watching them being close to it. We think there’s going to be a few offshoots out of there that will surprise some people as well.”

MORE DEVILS COVERAGE:
Devils take Jack Hughes with No. 1 overall pick
Shero on Subban trade, Hall’s future with Devils
Devils-Rangers rivalry gets boost thanks to Hughes, Kakko

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Vegas faces offseason moves to get under salary cap

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LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Vegas Golden Knights answered one offseason question when they signed William Karlsson to an eight-year contract.

Now they have to get under the salary cap before the start of next season.

Per Capfriendly.com, the Golden Knights’ projected cap hit is currently $89,024,999. The NHL recently announced next year’s limit will be $81.5 million, up $2 million from last season. That means the team needs to shave a little more than $7.5 million to clear the cap.

”It can get cumbersome for some teams in the middle of the summer, but typically it doesn’t matter once you get to the season,” Golden Knights president George McPhee said before the start of the team’s development camp on Tuesday. ”The plan was to build a team the best we could. Every once in a while, you get tight on the cap in this business. We’re there now, we’ll manage it and we will hopefully be in a much better place going forward with lots of cap space if we ever need it.”

McPhee said he tendered qualifying offers to each of the team’s restricted free agents, and now it’s a wait-and-see approach. He added he isn’t worried about the lingering David Clarkson contract, and ”really isn’t the issue that people think it is because you can just replace that salary at the right time.”

The Golden Knights agreed to take on Clarkson’s contract from Columbus, which parted with a first- and second-round pick in exchange, while negotiating for Vegas to pick Karlsson in the 2017 expansion draft. But Clarkson’s NHL career is likely over due to a chronically injured back, and the Golden Knights will create some cap space when he goes on injured reserve.

Brandon Pirri, Ryan Carpenter, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare and Deryk Engelland are eligible for unrestricted free agency. Young forwards Pirri and Carpenter may no longer fit in Vegas’ scheme with Alex Tuch signed through the 2025-26 season, and Erik Haula expected back after missing much of last season with a knee injury. Bellemare and Engelland have expressed interest in staying in Las Vegas, but could be headed elsewhere.

Then there is forward Cody Eakin and defenseman Colin Miller, who have garnered plenty of attention from other teams.

Eakin, who is coming off a career season, is due to make $3.85 million next year, while Miller, who struggled toward the end of last season, is due $3,875,000.

”We are going to have to make a few moves,” McPhee said. ”We’ve planned for that; we are going through that exercise right now. When we’re done, we’ll talk about it and explain it.”

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Karlsson among those choosing to stay put, avoid free agency

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Erik Karlsson wanted some time and space.

When the San Jose Sharks acquired the Norris Trophy-winning defenseman in a trade last September, he and his wife told them up front they wouldn’t sign a long-term contract until they played a season to see if it was a fit. They gave general manager Doug Wilson their word they would make a decision in enough time let the Sharks plan their offseason.

Karlsson signed two weeks before free agency opened.

”They were letting me play hockey and getting adjusted to everything, and that meant the world to me,” Karlsson said after signing for $92 million over eight years . ”I’m very happy with how everything happened and that they didn’t force me into making a decision earlier than this.”

Karlsson is one of several players who might have landed richer contracts via free agency and opted instead to re-sign with their teams. For Karlsson, Philadelphia’s Kevin Hayes, Vancouver’s Alex Edler, Buffalo’s Jeff Skinner, Washington’s Carl Hagelin and Tampa Bay’s Braydon Coburn, staying put won out over the risk of the open market.

”You never know what’s going to be out there if you go to free agency,” Edler said. ”There’s a lot of factors coming up here in the next few years with the potential lockout (and) there’s an expansion draft (for Seattle).”

A lower than expected salary cap set at $81.5 million also means there will be less money available all around July 1.

Of course, it’s not like most of these deals were hometown discounts. Karlsson got the richest salary for a defenseman in NHL history, Hayes signed for $50 million and Skinner turned a career year into $72 million . No matter the cap, the possibility existed that free agent frenzy could land them bigger deals.

They just didn’t want to find out.

”Going to July 1 is nice, (but) it’s kind of nice to be able to get it over with and sign with a tremendous team,” Hayes said. ”July 1 and unrestricted free agency is definitely an intriguing idea. But when I sat down with my agent and we kind of thought about what type of team I’d want to go and where I’d fit into the organization and the team, the Flyers were at the top of the list.”

The Flyers acquired the rights to Hayes from Winnipeg in early June and had to sell him on the benefits of playing in Philly. Elsewhere, familiarity helped. Just as Karlsson and wife Melinda got to know the Bay Area and Sharks organization over nine months, Skinner’s 40-goal season in Buffalo convinced him to stay.

”Going through the process, you think about everything, you weigh the pros and cons,” Skinner said. ”We just didn’t feel the need to get to that point because I like it here and I didn’t feel like it needed to get to that point where I wanted to look elsewhere.”

Coburn, who took a pay cut to sign a $3.4 million, two-year contract , said Tampa feeling like home off the ice and ”unfinished business” on the ice made staying his family’s top choice. After finishing 21 points ahead of the rest of the league and getting swept in the first round of the playoffs, the Lightning are the early favorites to win the Stanley Cup next season.

”We have an unbelievable team here and I want to be a part of it,” Coburn said.

Hagelin feels the same way about the Capitals after playing only 27 regular-season and playoff games with them since late February. The 30-year-old feared Washington’s salary-cap squeeze might impede him from sticking around but was willing to take a lower salary than he could’ve gotten on the open market to get an $11 million, four-year deal with a team he believes can win a championship in that time like it did in 2018.

”I wouldn’t have signed with Washington if I didn’t believe there’s still a good chance to win the Stanley Cup,” Hagelin said.

Edler last played a playoff game in 2014 and the Canucks are in the midst of a rebuild. Combine that with him being 33 and it might have been easy to understand Edler wanting to test the market. Instead, he had no wanderlust and agreed to a $12 million, two-year deal after 13 seasons with the Canucks.

”I’ve said from the beginning that if a deal was available with Vancouver, that was my No. 1 priority,” Edler said.

Wilson, the Sharks GM, traded for Karlsson and now locked down an elite offensive defenseman for the rest of his prime. Wilson related to their situation because his wife is from Chicago, where he played his entire career, and took the chance that the Karlssons would enjoy San Jose enough to want to stay.

”We trusted in that process,” Wilson said.

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