Looking ahead to 2011 free agency

1 Comment

joethornton.jpgSo you’re left feeling flat and anguished by the slow, methodical process of the 2010 free agency season. It’s understandable that with Ilya Kovalchuk just having two known suitors chasing after him and other secondary free agent prizes holding tight and not rushing to go anywhere else just yet that you, the fan, might feel let down.

While your thoughts have already turned to how your team is going to do next season, are there reasons to get excited about next year’s free agency brand of Supermarket Sweep? You bet there is, and not everything will turn out to be a can of prunes either, there’s some prime pieces of steak to be had.

Anaheim: Todd Marchant, Aaron Voros, Ryan Carter, Curtis McElhinney

Atlanta: Todd White, Chris Thorburn, Eric Boulton, Brent Sopel

Boston: Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara, Michael Ryder, Marco Sturm, Mark Recchi, Mark Stuart

Buffalo: Tim Connolly, Mike Grier, Rob Niedermayer, Cody McCormick, Craig Rivet, Steve Montador, Patrick Lalime

Calgary: Alex Tanguay, Curtis Glencross, Steve Staios, Mark Giordano, Adam Pardy, Staffan Kronwall, Henrik Karlsson

Carolina: Erik Cole, Sergei Samsonov, Jussi Jokinen, Chad Larose, Pat Dwyer, Joni Pitkanen, Anton Babchuk, Jay Harrison

Chicago: Tomas Kopecky, Marty Reasoner

Colorado: Milan Hejduk, David Koci, Scott Hannan, Adam Foote, Craig Anderson, Peter Budaj

Columbus: Chris Clark, Ethan Moreau, Andrew Murray, Jan Hejda, Mathieu Garon

Dallas: Brad Richards, Brian Sutherby, Brandon Segal, Trevor Daley, Karlis Skrastins, Brad Lukowich, Jeff Woywitka

Detroit: Kris Draper, Patrick Eaves, Drew Miller, Nicklas Lidstrom, Jonathan Ericsson, Derek Meech, Chris Osgood, Jimmy Howard

Edmonton: Ryan Jones, Steve McIntyre, Jim Vandermeer, Jason Strudwick

Florida: Cory Stillman, Radek Dvorak, Chris Higgins, Bryan McCabe, Nathan Paetsch, Tomas Vokoun

Los Angeles: Michal Handzus, Justin Williams, Peter Harrold, Erik Ersberg

Minnesota: Chuck Kobasew, Antti Miettinen, Andrew Brunette, Josh Harding

Montreal: Mathieu Darche, Andrei Markov, Roman Hamrlik, Hal Gill, Alex Auld

Nashville: Steve Sullivan, Joel Ward, Marcel Goc, Jerred Smithson, Jamie Lundmark, Wade Belak

New Jersey: Jason Arnott, Jamie Langenbrunner, Andy Greene, Johan Hedberg

New York Islanders: P.A. Parenteau, Zenon Konopka, Trevor Gillies, Radek Martinek, Milan Jurcina, Dwayne Roloson

New York Rangers: Vaclav Prospal, Donald Brashear (yes, he’s still there), Steve Eminger

Ottawa: Alexei Kovalev, Jarkko Ruutu, Ryan Shannon, Chris Phillips, Pascal Leclaire

Philadelphia: Simon Gagne, Nikolai Zherdev, Ville Leino, Riley Cote, Sean O’Donnell, Brian Boucher

Phoenix: Radim Vrbata, Scottie Upshall, Petr Prucha, Vernon Fiddler, Andrew Ebbett, Ed Jovanovski, Ilya Bryzgalov, Jason Labarbera

Pittsburgh: Pascal Dupuis, Maxime Talbot, Michael Rupp, Eric Godard, Craig Adams

San Jose: Joe Thornton, Scott Nichol, Niclas Wallin, Kent Huskins, Jay Leach

St. Louis: David Backes, Jay Winchester, Cam Janssen, Eric Brewer, Nathan Oystrick, Ty Conklin

Tampa Bay: Mike Smith

Toronto: Fredrik Sjostrom, Tomas Kaberle

Vancouver: Darcy Hordichuk, Tanner Glass, Rick Rypien, Joel Perreault, Kevin Bieksa, Sami Salo, Christian Ehrhoff, Shane O’Brien, Andrew Alberts

Washington: Alexander Semin, Mike Knuble, Brooks Laich, Matt Bradley, Boyd Gordon, Tom Poti, John Erskine

Mind you, these are just the guys who are slated to become unrestricted free agents after next season. There’s plenty of guys who are set to become restricted free agents as well including some already huge stars in the league, but you have to presume that more often than not they’ll get deals worked out with their parent clubs somehow.

This list, however, has a lot of hope for an exciting off-season in 2011 with names like Joe Thornton, Tomas Vokoun, Brad Richards, David Backes, Patrice Bergeron and Zdeno Chara sitting out as possibilities. If by some freakish stroke of magic all of these guys become free agents next year, we’ll have more than enough spice to keep next summer busy with rumors and speculation.

As it is, we live in the now and right now things are quiet and rather unexciting. But next year… Next year shows great promise for free agency hijinks.

Golden Knights compare Eakin major to infamous call against Saints

via Getty Images/NBC Sports
3 Comments

In case you’re wondering: yes, the Vegas Golden Knights are very unhappy about Cody Eakin receiving a game misconduct and five-minute major for cross-checking Joe Pavelski, which opened the door for the San Jose Sharks scoring an staggering four goals on the ensuing power play.

The Sharks would eventually fight back from a 3-0 deficit with that power play, although they needed OT to beat the Golden Knights 5-4, which means the Sharks won the series 4-3.

Here’s the hit, which left Pavelski bleeding, and needing plenty of help to leave the ice surface. (Pavelski didn’t return, and the extent of his injuries remains unknown.)

Whether you believe that was the right call or not, it absolutely swung the game, at least for a time. The Golden Knights were up 3-0, and it seemed like they could weather most things … but a power play that wouldn’t end even if the Sharks scored multiple goals? That wasn’t most things.

Credit the Golden Knights for playing well after the shock of that, even scoring a goal to send Game 7 to overtime, but that doesn’t mean they put that call aside.

The most colorful quotes probably come from Jonathan Marchessault, the player who scored the goal to send the game to overtime, and who had a strong Game 7 overall.

“It’s the same thing as that football game, the Saints, it changes the whole outcome,” Marchessault said, via Sin Bin Vegas’ transcription. “The refs just got involved in the game and now our summer starts. Now five [expletive] months until game one.”

Marchessault is referencing the missed pass interference call from the Saints – Rams NFC title game back in January, which drew an admission of a mistake from the NFL.

ESPN’s Greg Wyshynski has more from Marchessault, though a warning: Marchessault’s comments apparently rank as NSFW and not very family-friendly.

It seems like Golden Knights coach Gerard Gallant kept it together a bit more, or at least used more PG-friendly language.

“Last season we lost in the Stanley Cup Final, and that was hard,” Gallant said, according to Jesse Granger of the Athletic. “But tonight, this is worse.”

No doubt, officials will be scrutinized for that call. The NHL might even feel compelled to tweak the way calls are made because of it. That much, we’ll need to wait and see.

Yet, there are some questions from Vegas’ end. Yes, it’s difficult to kill five minutes of power play, especially against a Sharks team that a) is extremely dangerous, b) was furious after seeing Joe Pavelski hurt, c) had already failed on four power plays, and d) smelled blood with its season on the line. Still, should Gallant had called a timeout to try to ease some of the momentum, and calm things down? Could Marc-Andre Fleury have stopped at least one of those four goals? As the anger subsides, the Golden Knights should grapple with some of those questions, even if they leave a bitter taste.

Much like the Rams advancing to the Super Bowl, the Sharks eliminated the Golden Knights and will face the Avalanche in Round 2, whether that finish seems unfair or not. The Golden Knights will have to face bitter months in trying to avenge this loss.

And, true, they might also lose some money if the league decides to fine them for criticizing the officiating.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

The Playoff Buzzer: Bruins, Sharks in Game 7 heaven after clinching respective Round 1 series

Getty Images
Leave a comment
  • The Toronto Maple Leafs must hate facing the Boston Bruins in Round 1. They’re now 0-for-3 in attempts to beat them in the opening series of the Stanley Cup Playoffs after the Bruins beat them 5-1 in Game 7
  • 3-1 down in the series. 3-0 down in the third period of Game 7. And somehow, some way, the San Jose Sharks are off to the second round

Bruins 5, Leafs 1 (BOS wins 4-3)

It wasn’t nearly as dramatic as recent Game 7s between these two clubs, but the Bruins jumped out to a 2-0 lead, survived an onslaught in the second period and then found three more in the third as Mike Babcock failed to adjust in time. The Bruins are now 8-12 under Babcock in the playoffs over the past three seasons and are out of the playoffs after spending big money on John Tavares and bolstering their back end to get Jake Muzzin prior to the trade deadline. All for naught, and a lot of questions that need to be answered in TO.

Sharks 5, Golden Knights 4 [OT] (SJS wins 4-3)

How do you explain this one? Down 3-0 in the third period, the San Jose Sharks are sent a gift from the heavens in the form of a controversial five-minute major assessed to Cody Eakin. Then this happened:

PHT’s James O’Brien has the rest in the link above.

Three stars

1. Kevin Labanc, San Jose Sharks

Four points in a span of four minutes and change, including the go-ahead goal to cap off one of the greatest comebacks in hockey history (and sports, too).

Labanc assisted on the three goals that led to a tied game, all on the power play after Eakin’s major. Quite the turnaround for Labanc, who had one goal coming into Game 7.

Oh, and he set one record and matched another:

2. Logan Couture, San Jose Sharks

Couture sparked the comeback, scoring seven seconds into Eakin’s major.

“The message was that’s one, let’s go,” Couture said after the game.

After Tomas Hertl scored his sixth of the series to pull San Jose to 3-2, Couture joined him with his sixth to tie the game.

3. Tuukka Rask, Boston Bruins

Rask had the kitchen thrown at him in the second period but stopped 12 of 13 in the frame to preserve a 2-1 lead. That effort (along with his 12 first-period saves) seemed to propel the Bruins in the third. Boston found three more goals, including two into an empty net and shut down the Leafs who were out of options and out of ideas to solve Rask.

Unlikely star of the night

Barclay Goodrow, San Jose Sharks

Goodrow barely played in regulation, going minus-3 and then he was stapled to the bench in the overtime period.

“Legs were fresh,” Goodrow joked following the game.

Fresh enough that he made sure the Sharks moved onto Round 2 of the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Two playoff goals for Goodrow. Two game-winners.

Highlights of the night

Goodrow’s series clincher in OT:

Sometimes big goals come from lower down the lineup. This one was massive:

Factoids of the night

Bizarre video of the night

Wednesday’s game

Game 7: Hurricanes at Capitals (Series tied 3-3), 7:30 p.m. ET, NBCSN (Live Stream)


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Sharks eliminate Golden Knights in unforgettable Game 7

10 Comments

If someone ever snickered at you for claiming that anything can happen in the hockey playoffs, merely direct them to Game 7 of the Vegas Golden Knights and San Jose Sharks.

At the tailend of a thrilling overtime period (did these two teams really just play a double-OT Game 6?), Barclay Goodrow became the unlikely series-clincher in one of the least likely Game 7 comebacks you’ll ever see. The Sharks advance to Round 2 and a matchup against the Colorado Avalanche after beating the Golden Knights 5-4 in OT. San Jose wins the series 4-3.

But they had to do that after falling behind 3-1 in the series, and carving their way out of a 3-0 deficit in Game 7. It’s the sort of game hockey lovers will pour over for ages, and fans of both teams are unlikely to forget.

All things considered, that unlikely Goodrow goal seems fitting.

How we got to overtime, against all odds

On the strength of great goaltending from Marc-Andre Fleury, a Cody Eakin goal that required a review for a high-stick, and a groaner of a 3-0 goal for Max Pacioretty, it sure looked like the Golden Knights were going to skate away with Game 7. Then Eakin became a much bigger story than the fellow who scored what seemed, at the time, like a big goal.

In a scary moment, Eakin hit Joe Pavelski, who hit the ice in an extremely scary way. Fair or not, the officials ejected Eakin from Game 7, whistling him for a game-changing major penalty.

The Sharks went on to score an absurd four goals on the power play, flipping a 3-0 deficit to a 4-3 Sharks lead. With less than seven minutes remaining in the third period, the Golden Knights had to come to grips with the first lead change of this series.

The Golden Knights failed to score on a power-play opportunity of their own, but Jonathan Marchessault delivered after Vegas showed serious resiliency in trying to come back, and a stunning Game 7 went to overtime.

And the rest is … well, NHL history, and the Sharks will turn to a Round 2 series against the Avalanche. Credit the Golden Knights for forcing this contest to OT, but they couldn’t win it, and now their fans get a taste of something other hockey fans – particularly those of the Sharks – know all too well: the feeling of shock, and also, feeling like they were on the wrong end of the refs’ whistles.

What a game, what a comeback, and what a series.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Pavelski hurt, Eakin ejected, Sharks steal lead on huge Game 7 power play

6 Comments

At one point, the crowd in San Jose was “you can hear a pin drop” quiet in Game 7, as the Golden Knights built what looked like a suffocating 3-0 lead. Fittingly in a back-and-forth series and a generally wild Round 1, the hockey world should have expected the unexpected.

Update: Then more unexpected happened in Game 7, as the Golden Knights kept pushing after the Sharks built that unlikely 4-3 lead, with Vegas scoring a 4-4 goal to send it to OT. The Sharks then won 5-4 in OT via a goal by Barclay Goodrow. Check out this recap for the rundown of Game 7, while Vegas reacted to the penalty call here. The Buzzer covers Tuesday’s two Game 7 matchups.

It sounds like Joe Pavelski might be OK.

In a startling series of events:

  • Joe Pavelski was hurt, possibly badly, on an awkward-looking hit, which drew a five-minute major penalty on Cody Eakin. Video will be added soon, but here it is in GIF form:
  • That was a frightening sight, and the officials responded by ejecting Eakin and charging him with a major penalty. This came after the Sharks began Game 7 going 0-for-4 on the power play.
  • The Sharks took advantage of that five-minute major, and the fact that it doesn’t end when you score a power-play goal. San Jose scored a ridiculous four goals on that major penalty to take a stunning lead.

Here are the goals in video form:

Was this the right call, or did Eakin draw a major penalty because of the optics of Pavelski’s scary injury? That’s a debate that could linger, but the bottom line is that the Sharks are now, somehow, up 4-3 with little time remaining in the third period.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.