Dallas Stars sale down to two Canadian businessmen

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Hicks2.jpgDallas Stars fans, start rejoicing.

The time when Tom Hicks is
no longer the owner of the Stars is drawing ever closer, which can only
be a relief during a time in which the team is completely handcuffed
financially. Hicks Sports Group, the holding company that owns the
Stars, is locked in a financial battle to pay back $525 million in
defaulted loans — HSG is currently attempting sell the Texas Rangers,
and now it seems that the sale of the Dallas Stars is getting ready to
take the next step.

David Shoalts of the Globe and Mail is
reporting that according to his sources, the next owner of the Dallas
Stars will be one of two Canadian businessmen.

The local potential
ownership group, fronted by Jim Lites and with Mike Modano as a
potential member, has fallen out of contention for ownership of the
Stars according to Shoalts.

So that leaves Calgary oil businessman
Bill Gallacher and Vancouver businessman Tom Gaglardi. Per Shoalts:

At this point, there is no favourite in this race but the clear winners
barring any surprise developments will be the NHL and Dallas hockey
fans. If either Gallacher or Gaglardi is presented to the league
governors for approval this summer, it will be a second home run on the
ownership front for NHL commissioner Gary Bettman after some
embarrassing whiffs. Both men have deep pockets, something of a rarity
among NHL owners in recent years.

The key words there are “deep pockets”. As Hicks’ spending habits
started to dry up, so did the Stars ability to continue to maintain a
high level of success. While there certainly some growing pains
associated with the transition to Joe Nieuwendyk’s and coach Marc
Crawford’s new system, it’s seemed for the past few seasons that the
Stars were just a few players away from truly being special —
especially on defense.

The Stars are currently sitting $14 million or so under the salary
cap with six spots open on the roster. In reality, the team is
handcuffed by an internal budget that likely limits the Stars to $10
million under the cap; a very painful proposition for fans that see a
team on the cusp of making the next step.

While Gallacher would be a welcome addition to the NHL and to Dallas, you have to think that Tom Gaglardi would ultimately be the best choice. He is part owner of the Kamloops Blazers and has ties with the NHL already. Gallacher’s deep pockets would be welcome, certainly, but one with deep pockets and an in with the league would be welcomed with open arms.

It’s highly unlikely that a change in ownership will be able to help
the Stars this summer — free agency begins in July and the board of
governors still needs to vote on which ownership group they’d approve.
It’s more than likely that both Gaglardi and Gallacher would be easily
approved, it’s just a matter now of HSG and Tom Hicks deciding on the
better offer. According to Shoalts, the team could be sold for between
$200 and $240 million “depending on how the team’s debt under current
owner Tom Hicks is handled.” Still, a change in ownership this summer
will certainly free up the team for any moves they need to make next
season.

The Stars have seen revenue drop a bit recently, after years of being
one of the highest revenue-producing teams in the NHL. They missed the
playoffs two years in a row for the first time since moving to Dallas
and there is not doubt that the team has taken a backseat to the Dallas
Cowboys, Dallas Mavericks and Texas Rangers — a dangerous position to
be in for hockey in North Texas.

Yet I can tell you that an eager and enthusiastic owner, one who is
smart and yet still willing to spend the money, has the ability to make
Dallas a hockey crazy city once more. The team has recently taken steps
to lower ticket prices and get away from the “corporate” reputation that
had surrounded the team since moving to American Airlines Center — the
lower bowl, once dominated by business-owned season ticket holders, is
now being catered to the true fan.

Whether it’s Bill Gallacher or Tom Gaglardi, there’s no doubt that
the change will be good not only for the Dallas Stars and the fans but
for the NHL as well. Hockey is amazingly popular in Texas and the league
needs for the Stars to be successful. More importantly, the team needs
an owner that knows what it takes to build a successful team. Hicks’
strategy was to hand over control to Bob Gainey and then sit back and
reap the benefits; since his departure as GM it’s been nothing but a
downward spiral.

Trade: Sens send Hoffman to Sharks for underwhelming return

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The Mike Hoffman era in Ottawa is officially over.

On Tuesday morning, the Senators shipped Hoffman, defenseman Cody Donaghey and a fifth-round pick in 2020 to the San Jose Sharks for forward Mikkel Boedker, defenseman Julius Bergman and a sixth-round pick in 2020.

“Today’s trade showcases our determination to strengthen the future of the team by improving chemistry, leadership and character in the locker room and on the ice. We are confident it is a step in the right direction for the long-term success of this organization,” Senators general manager Pierre Dorion in a release.

That certainly seems like an underwhelming return for an established top-six forward like Hoffman, but it’s not surprising given what we found out last week.

It was reported by the Ottawa Citizen that Sens defenseman Erik Karlsson‘s wife, Melinda, filed an order of protection against Hoffman’s wife, Monika Caryk, for “a campaign of harassment that has plagued the Karlssons after the death of their son and through much of the last NHL season.”

The Hoffmans have since denied those allegations, but the damage had clearly been done.

So, with everything that we know, it’s easy to see why the Sens weren’t able to get much for a forward that has scored between 22 and 29 goals in each of his last four seasons. In 2017-18, Hoffman finished with 56 points in 82 games.

The 28-year-old has two years remaining on his contract that comes with a cap hit of $5.187,500.

Donaghey made his professional debut last season, as he accumulated nine goals and seven assists in 54 games with the ECHL’s Brampton Beast.

As for what the Sharks gave up, it really doesn’t seem like much if we strictly look at this from a talent-for-talent point of view.

Since signing with San Jose as a free agent two years ago, Boedker has put together back-to-back average seasons. The 28-year-old had just 10 goals and 26 points in 81 games in 2016-17, but he managed to increase those totals to 15 goals and 37 points in 74 games last season.

Boedker will make $4 million per season for the next two years.

“Mikkel Boedker is a competitive, versatile, two-way forward who can play both wings,” added Dorion. “He has a track record of playing his best hockey in the most important games, including the playoffs and internationally. His skill set – in particular his speed – along with his veteran leadership fits with our vision for the team.”

Bergman was San Jose’s second-round pick in the 2014 NHL Entry Draft. The 22-year-old had 10 goals and 10 assists 65 games with the San Jose Barracuda in the AHL.

From a Sharks perspective, it’s the second time in a few months that they pull off a trade for a talented winger (they landed Evander Kane from Buffalo at the trade deadline). In both cases, they seemed to pay a remarkably cheap price for a good amount of skill. Both players seemed to come with their share of (very different) concerns, but that doesn’t seem to bother GM Doug Wilson.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Contract request led to breakup between Barry Trotz, Capitals

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Barry Trotz’s desire for a big salary raise and five-year extension was the beginning of the end of his tenure with the Washington Capitals.

Trotz, who resigned on Monday after earning a two-year extension that was triggered by the Capitals’ Stanley Cup victory, wanted to be paid as one of the NHL’s top coaches, but the team was hesitant to make that kind of commitment. It was reported that Trotz was earning $1.5 million per season and the new deal would have only increased his salary by $300,000 a year.

The money and the term requested was a little too much for the Capitals.

“There are probably three, four guys that are making that money, so it’s the upper echelon. It’s the big-revenue teams,” Capitals general manager Brian MacLellan said, referring to the salaries of coaches like Mike Babcock, Claude Julien and Joel Quenneville.

“I don’t think all teams pay that type of money and years. Certain teams are open to it and the rest of the league isn’t,” he added.

MacLellan described the five-year contract ask as a “sticking point.”

“You have a coach that’s been here four years, you do another five, that nine years,” he said. “There’s not many coaches that have that lasting ability. It’s a long time and it’s a lot of money to be committing to a coach.”

[Barry Trotz steps down as Capitals head coach]

If you look at the Capitals’ head coaching history over the last 16 years, they haven’t gone out of their way to open up the checkbook to pay for a big-name, high-priced coach. Before Trotz arrived in 2014, you had Adam Oates, Dale Hunter, Bruce Boudreau, Glen Hanlon and Bruce Cassidy all getting their first NHL head coaching gigs in D.C.

MacLellan said he was hopeful that both sides could work out a short-term deal, but Trotz clearly wanted security and to rightly use the leverage of a Cup victory to cash in. The GM did note that he accepted Trotz’s resignation so he’s free to pursue offers from other teams to coach next season.

As for where the Capitals go next, Todd Reirden is the front-runner to replace Trotz. Bumped up to “associate coach” in 2016, the organization values him and has been grooming him to become a head coach, either with the franchise or elsewhere. MacLellan said Reirden will get a formal interview.

“We’ll see how the talk goes with him and then we’ll make a decision based on that,” he said. “If it goes well, we’ll pursue Todd. If it doesn’t, then we’ll open it up a little bit.”

MORE:Where does NHL’s coaching carousel stop after Trotz resignation?

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Sean Leahy is a writer forPro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line atphtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Where does NHL’s coaching carousel stop after Trotz resignation?

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The NHL’s coaching carousel is officially in motion after the stunning news from Monday that Barry Trotz is stepping down as head coach of the Washington Capitals less than two weeks after lifting the Stanley Cup.

It leaves a lot of questions to be answered in the coming days and weeks. Let’s get into some of them!

Is the Capitals’ job Todd Reirden’s to lose?

At the start of the playoffs the possibility of Trotz not returning to Washington seemed to be very real, especially given his contract situation.

If the Capitals fell short of winning the Stanley Cup yet again it seemed inevitable that a coaching change was going to be coming.

Then the Capitals went and actually won the Stanley Cup and at that point it seemed inevitable that Trotz was absolutely going to return, especially when general manager Brian MacLellan said right after the Game 5 victory that if Trotz wanted to return, he would. The whole contract extension issue kept getting pushed back, and then Monday’s news broke that winning the Stanley Cup actually kicked in an automatic two-year extension for Trotz — an extension that would have been below market value for a Cup-winning coach.

With the two sides unable to work out a suitable extension, Trotz stepped down creating the new opening.

The obvious answer here is a promotion from within, and they seem to have a replacement already waiting in current assistant coach Todd Reirden.

[Related: Barry Trotz steps down as Capitals head coach]

Reirden has been with the Capitals as an assistant since the 2014-15 season and has been mentioned as a candidate for several head coaching vacancies in recent years, but the Capitals — obviously valuing him as a coach — did not allow him to interview for head coaching vacancies a year ago. In 2016, he was promoted to associate coach.

One thing is for sure, no matter who takes that job would be facing an enormous amount of pressure. You are not only replacing a coach that just finally helped end the organization’s Stanley Cup drought, but the coach that is without question the most successful coach in the history of the franchise. Expectations are going to be through the roof.

What are Trotz’s options?

Now that Trotz is a free agent his situation becomes especially intriguing because as the reigning Stanley Cup winning coach he can pretty much call his shot.

At the moment his options are extremely limited as the New York Islanders are the only team without a head coach. That could be a pretty intriguing job, especially if the Islanders are able to get superstar center John Tavares re-signed before he hits the open market. That is a dynamic offensive team that could have a superstar in Tavares (assuming he re-signs), an emerging star in Mathew Barzal, another 40-goal scorer in Anders Lee, and two other really strong top-six forwards in Josh Bailey and Jordan Eberle. They need to solidify the back end and the disastrous goaltending situation (think about the possibility of a Trotz and Philip Grubauer reunion in Brooklyn!) but there is a lot to work with there.

The Islanders had a bad year, but it is not a situation that is going to require an extensive, lengthy rebuild. With a few tweaks here and there this could be a playoff team this season.

But if that doesn’t appeal to Trotz (or if the Islanders can’t make an agreement work) he is going to have to play the waiting game.

There is always the possibility that another team could see Trotz become available and decide to make a coaching change given the opportunity to add someone of that caliber.

Other than that it might be a waiting game until someone decides to pink slip their coach during the 2018-19 season. There were no coaching changes during the 2017-18 season (almost unheard of in the NHL) but given the availibility of Trotz it is not a stretch to think that a team like St. Louis, Minnesota, or Anaheim could make a change early in the season if things are not going well out of the gate.

The other option: Trotz takes the entire year off and starts fresh in 2019. He would still have the drawing card of being a Stanley Cup winning coach, still be a big name, and still be at the top of almost every “want list” for a team with a vacancy.

Either way, Trotz’s decision on Monday unexpectedly threw the NHL’s coaching carousel into overdrive and it is going to be fascinating to see where it stops.

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Barry Trotz steps down as Capitals head coach

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Some massive news from the Stanley Cup champions on Monday as the Washington Capitals announced that Barry Trotz is stepping down as head coach of the team.

“After careful consideration and consultation with my family, I am officially announcing my resignation as Head Coach of the Washington Capitals,” said Trotz in a statement.

“When I came to Washington four years ago we had one goal in mind and that was to bring the Stanley Cup to the nation’s capital. We had an incredible run this season culminating with our players and staff achieving our goal and sharing the excitement with our fans. I would like to thank Mr. Leonsis, Dick Patrick and Brian MacLellan for giving me the opportunity to be a part of this great organization. I would also like to thank our players and staff who worked tirelessly every day to achieve our success.”

At this point you might be thinking to yourself, “wasn’t Trotz a free agent after this season with an expiring contract? What exactly is he stepping down from?” 

Well, according to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman that was going to be true had the Capitals not won the Stanley Cup. But Trotz’s contract had a clause in it that kicked in an automatic two-year extension if the Capitals won the Cup, which they obviously did earlier this month when they defeated the Vegas Golden Knights in five games. According to Friedman the extension was for below the market value given the exploding market for coaching contracts in the NHL.

TSN’s Pierre LeBrun reports that it was a $300,000 raise that would have brought his contract value to $1.8 million per year.

The two sides attempted to negotiate a new extension but could not come to terms.

Now that Trotz has resigned, the Capitals will grant permission to any team that wishes to hire Trotz, essentially making him a free agent.

Other than the Capitals, the only other team in the NHL without a head coach at the moment is the New York Islanders and it would be absolutely shocking if they did not have some serious interest in hiring him.

The last two coaches to leave a Stanley Cup champion the year after winning were Scotty Bowman when he retired following the Detroit Red Wings’ win in 2002 and Mike Keenan following the New York Rangers’ win in 1994.

During Trotz’s four years with the team the Capitals won the Stanley Cup, two Presidents’ Trophies, and compiled a 205-89-34 record. No other team in the NHL won more than 192 games during that stretch.

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.