On the big stage, Subban can’t escape ‘The Trade’

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PITTSBURGH — Three hundred and thirty-three days.

That’s how long it’s been since the Canadiens and Predators pulled off the seismic P.K. Subban-for-Shea Weber trade.

The deal was made on June 29, 2016. Today is May 28, 2017.

Three hundred and thirty-three days.

You’d think, then, given all that’s transpired in between, Subban would have plenty of topics to discuss on Sunday for Stanley Cup Final media day. He could talk about the first Cup Final in Preds franchise history, for example. Or maybe his role on what’s become the league’s best blueline. Perhaps some thoughts on Nashville’s emergence as a hockey market.

Nah. Because people still wanted to talk about The Trade.

So P.K. obliged.

“When David [Poile, Nashville’s GM] made that trade, whether we wanted to say it or not, a lot of people touted it to be a boost that was going to put us over the top,” Subban said, replying to the first of many questions about the now famous deal. “I didn’t really see it that way, but it seems that for our team, we just gelled at the right time and we’ve been clicking down the stretch.

“I guess you could say I’m definitely happier. Just to come in and do my job every day, whether that’s to play 32 minutes or play 15. I’m just happy to do whatever it takes to win.”

To be fair, it’s not like talking about The Trade rehashes old stuff. Quite the opposite, what with new storylines emerging on a weekly basis. The latest? Well, a question was asked today if Subban would bring the Cup back to Montreal, should he win it. Which came on the heels of the narrative that, in just one year, P.K. and the Preds got to where P.K. and the Habs couldn’t over the previous seven.

So, back to The Trade.

“One of the toughest things for me to think about was coming into a locker room that [Weber had] been in for 12 years, and figure out how I was going to fit in,” Subban said. “Because he had such a great presence, and such a great career in Nashville. I’m sure when he had to go to Montreal, he had to do similar things as well.

“When I got traded, I said it. Now, I don’t know if I want to look back, but I said I felt like I could win a Stanley Cup with this hockey club. I’m sure [Weber] felt the same way too when he was here.”

Winning the Cup was what Poile envisioned after making the deal. He recalled his first meeting with Subban and how, early into it, the two squared away any issues that might arise from Subban’s off-ice interests — his charity work, his foundation, his growing media presence, etc. etc.

Poile:

The whole idea was to get on the same page. Just the first meeting we had, like, ‘What are your goals?’

He said, ‘To win the Stanley Cup.’

I said, ‘That’s what our goals are, too.’

If we can get that straightened away in terms of your desires to be the best hockey player you can be, and we can both work towards winning the Stanley Cup together, we’ve got mostly everything covered. The other parts of your life, what you do off the ice, we would like to be there to support you.

I think the most important thing is that the left hand knows what the right hand is doing so there’s no surprising and, to repeat again, we can support you.

I don’t want to say it was as simple as that, but I think it was as simple as that.

Finally, everyone knows you can’t talk about The Trade without asking The Question.

And so it was posed to Subban. You’re in the Cup Final. The Habs were bounced in Round 1.

Who won it?

“What Shea brings and what I bring — maybe we have some similarities, but we have some differences as well,” Subban explained. “As far as who wins the trade, I think that both teams are different and were looking for something different.

“I don’t think I can really debate who won the trade. I’ll allow you guys to do that, you guys got all the stats and the numbers and statistics. I’m just focused on our team right now.”

And with that, Subban was done talking about The Trade.

For today, anyway.

David Poile finally rewarded with first trip to Stanley Cup Final in 35 years as a GM

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) David Poile thought he could squeeze in a quick day off after the exhilarating run by the Nashville Predators to their first Stanley Cup Final.

Wrong.

At least 200 texts and emails congratulating him on the Western Conference title greeted him. Then Predators’ only general manager had to deal with logistics, tickets, hotel rooms and talk with league officials to prepare them for the Stanley Cup Final starting Monday night in Pittsburgh.

It’s Poile’s first Stanley Cup Final after 15 years as general manager of the Washington Capitals and nearly 20 years of building the Predators from scratch as an expansion franchise.

“After all these years I’m doing something I’ve never done before, and it’s different and it’s a challenge,” Poile said with a big smile. “But I’m ready for it.”

No general manager has been with his current team longer than Poile, whose father, Bud, won the Stanley Cup playing for Toronto in 1947 and is in the Hockey Hall of Fame. Next season, Poile will pass Jack Adams and Glen Sather as the NHL’s longest serving general manager, and only Sather has more games and wins (2,700 and 1,319) than Poile (2,622 and 1,280).

Read more:

The Predators built the NHL’s best defense, and it’s going to be around for a while

NHL GM of the Year finalists: Oilers’ Chiarelli, Sens’ Dorion, Preds’ Poile

Poile also was general manager of the U.S. Olympic team in 2014. But he never made it to Sochi after being struck by a puck in the right eye at a Predators’ morning skate, breaking his nose and costing him his vision.

Now, all across hockey, people are rooting for Poile to finally win a championship.

“The hockey community in general is elated for him,” said Brian Burke, president of hockey operations for the Calgary Flames. “He has performed at such a high level for so long in this league and not been rewarded like this. He’s got lots of people pulling for him to go all the way.”

New Jersey general manager Ray Shero, who was an assistant GM in Nashville, said his own wife was in tears so happy for Poile and his wife, Elizabeth.

“I was saying to David, ‘Yeah everybody’s saying it’s so great for David, patient David Poile,”‘ Shero said. “I’m like, ‘David, you’re the most impatient guy know.’ He used to boo the team from our box in Nashville like, ‘David, you’re so impatient.’ He’d boo the team and say, ‘He’s brutal, he’s brutal.”‘

Poile just missed Washington’ run to the Stanley Cup in 1998 after his contract wasn’t renewed in May 1997. He had gotten the Caps to the Eastern Conference finals only once – 1990. Offered the Toronto GM job, Poile turned down the franchise with 13 titles to put together his own franchise in Nashville like his father had in Philadelphia and Vancouver.

“I just felt like it was the right thing to do,” Poile said. “I’ve never regretted it. There’s certainly been some ups and downs in this franchise whether it be on the ice or off the ice. But that’s never deterred me to want to go somewhere else or to do something different. Everybody’s treated me very, very well. I’m very comfortable, and it’s a legacy for David Poile.”

Poile and the Predators had to teach their fans hockey and grow the sport in a region dominated by college football and NASCAR.

In 2007, the Predators finished third in the NHL with 110 points. Poile’s big trade for Peter Forsberg netted only a first-round loss in the playoffs. Craig Leipold, who now owns the Minnesota Wild, put the Preds up for sale. Blackberry billionaire Jim Balsillie’s purchase might have gone through if not for news he already was taking season-ticket deposits in Hamilton, Ontario.

Fans rallied to keep their team, and local businessmen stepped up to keep the Predators in Nashville.

During the turmoil, Poile couldn’t re-sign Forsberg or Paul Kariya and unloaded defenseman Kimmo Timonen and forward Scott Hartnell.

The man who loves to plan triggered this playoff run with a handful of trades. He swapped defensemen Seth Jones and captain Shea Weber for center Ryan Johansen and All-Star defenseman P.K. Subban, while bringing back veteran forward Vern Fiddler during the season along with trading for Cody McLeod.

“He’s made some of the biggest trades in the history of the league, which is just so contradictory to his personality,” Burke said. “He’s this cautious guy. I joke with him that I’d hate to watch him get dressed in the morning, trying to decide which tie and which pants. But when it comes time to make these deals, this guy, he’ll shove all the chips in and stand up and yell at you. He’s fearless.”

Poile took his wife outside the arena before Nashville ousted Anaheim in six games Monday night. He saw thousands of fans bringing lawn chairs just to sit outside the arena and watch on big-screen TVs and marveled.

“It’s fantastic, the whole thing, the whole experience,” Poile said. “I can’t think of anything that’s ever happened better to me in all my years in hockey.”

Well, maybe one more thing.

Price’s agent, Canadiens’ GM expected to meet next week

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It seems the two big orders of business for the Montreal Canadiens this offseason will be finding a way to re-sign Alexander Radulov, and come to terms on a new contract extension with franchise goaltender Carey Price.

According to multiple reports, including Pierre LeBrun and RDS, Price’s agent, Gerry Johansson, and Canadiens GM Marc Bergevin are expected to meet next week to potentially begin talking about a new deal.

Price, who has one year remaining on his current contract, will be eligible to sign a new extension on July 1 and it would be reasonable to assume that is going to be one of the larger contracts among the league’s goaltenders.

Price’s current contract will pay him $6.5 million next season, a figure that places him among the top-five goalies in the league.

Given what Price has meant to the Canadiens over the past four years he should expect to make something closer to the $7.5-$8 million figure that Henrik Lundqvist and Sergei Bobrovsky are currently making.

The 29-year-old Price has been one of the NHL’s best goalies for four years now and has a massive impact on the success of the Canadiens. When he is healthy, they win. When he is not (as he was not a year ago), they do not.

Of the 46 goalies that have appeared in at least 100 games since the start of the 2012-13 season, Price currently ranks in the top-three in save percentage (first), even-strength save percentage (first) goals against average (second), and shutouts (third). He has also taken home a Hart Trophy as league MVP and a Vezina Trophy as the NHL’s best goalie during that stretch.

In a surprise, Blues name Steve Ott assistant coach

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Pretty wild last few days for St. Louis on the coaching front.

After gutting Mike Yeo’s staff of four assistants, then hiring hiring Darryl Sydor, the Blues went totally off the grid on Friday by announcing longtime NHLer Steve Ott would become Yeo’s new assistant.

“Steve was a competitor on the ice as a player and I expect him to bring that energy in this role,” Yeo said in a release. “He was highly respected as a player and a person among his teammates and I believe he will be a huge asset to our staff.”

The decision caught many off guard given Ott, 34, has no prior coaching experience and was playing as recently as last month, suiting up for Montreal in its opening-round playoff loss to the Rangers.

Ott is familiar with the Blues organization, having played there for three seasons.

“I am very proud of my playing career and will devote the same work ethic to my coaching career,” said Ott. “The Blues organization is very special to me and my family and I’m excited to take the next step in my hockey career with this franchise.”

Blues GM Doug Armstrong signed Ott to a three-year deal. It’s fitting that Armstrong was the one to engineer this move, as he’s been behind unorthodox coaching moves in the past. Last summer, he defied convention by hiring Yeo as Ken Hitchcock’s assistant, with the understanding that Yeo would inherit the head man position next season.

It didn’t go exactly to plan. Armstrong fired Hitchcock in February, accelerating Yeo’s ascension.

For fourth time in five years Sergei Mozyakin is the KHL’s MVP

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The KHL handed out its awards for the 2016-17 season on Wednesday and it was Magnitogorsk Metallurg forward Sergei Mozyakin taking home the Golden Stick Trophy as the league MVP.

Given the season he had, and the career he has had in the KHL, this should not really be much of a surprise.

Mozyakin turned in one of the greatest performances in the history of the league this season by scoring 48 goals and recording 85 total points (both league records) in only 60 games.

Since the KHL formed in 2008-09 only three different players have won the Golden Stick award. Danis Zaripov won it during the inaugural season, while Alexander Radulov won it four times (three years in a row between 2009-10 and 2011-12, then again in 2014-15).

Mozyakin won it in 2012-13 and 2013-14, then in each of the past two seasons.

The 36-year-old forward was drafted by the Columbus Blue Jackets in the ninth-round (No. 262 overall) of the 2002 draft by never played a game in the NHL. He has spent his entire professional career playing in Russia where he has consistently been one of the best, most productive players in the league.

Among the KHL’s other award winners, Vasily Koshechkin was named the league’s top goalie, Oleg Znarok was the coach of the year, while Vladimir Tkachyov is the rookie of the year.