Tag: What Went Wrong

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

What Went Wrong: Vancouver Canucks


Of all the profiles done here to cover what caused the demise of a team in the playoffs, there hasn’t been one so plainly simple to draw up and point fingers at what went wrong. The Canucks issues were ultimately easy to figure out, their failure in the Stanley Cup finals was one that saw them go down without so much as a fight in Game 7.

What went wrong for the Vancouver Canucks? The paint-by-numbers crime scene investigation is pretty simple to follow.

1. Offense? What offense?
Eight goals in seven games in the finals. That’s all the Canucks could muster against Tim Thomas and the Bruins defense. Sure there was some bad luck and shots off the post but there were fanned on shots at open nets, inability to corral the puck in scoring opportunities and no wherewithal to fight harder against the Bruins to go for the goal.

The struggles of Henrik Sedin and Daniel Sedin in this series are going to haunt them until they’re able to win a Stanley Cup for themselves. Henrik finishes the Stanley Cup finals with just one goal and no assists while Daniel had one goal and one assist. For one former MVP and a current MVP candidate that’s patently inexcusable.

When you’re two of the best players in the game and your team’s fate rests on your production – you have to do better. The intimidation factor Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg threw at them with their physical play and positioning made them shy away from corners and pull back on their attack. Someone has to remind them that there is no fear in the Stanley Cup finals dojo.

2. Oh, Roberto
When your team isn’t scoring goals, your role as a goalie is to hold down the fort flawlessly to give your team that slight opening of being able to win games by scoring just one or two goals if possible. Roberto Luongo was able to do that twice in the finals shutting out the Bruins. He was able to hold things together well enough in Game 2 to open the door for Vancouver to come back from being down 2-1. In the other four games he lost, though, things did not go so well.

Luongo was pulled from two games in Boston while allowing a total of 15 goals on the road in parts of three games including a full 60 minutes worth of allowing eight goals in Game 3. Coming up that small in a road game is just not the mark of a championship team. Seeing Luongo get beaten in Game 7 by a great shot by Patrice Bergeron in the first period and then subsequently beaten thanks to a pair of freaky goals helped serve up all the psyche crushing a goalie needs to lose.

While no one will recall Luongo’s great games thanks to the team losing, his effort in the games he lost just was not on par with his play in Games 1, 2, and 5. That brand of inconsistency, even in spite of the Canucks inability to score, is maddening.

3. The disappearance of the vaunted power play
The Canucks power play was one of their strengths all season long scoring 24.3% of the time during the 82-game haul of the regular season. In prior rounds of the playoffs they were solid again scoring 28.3% of the time with the man advantage. In the Stanley Cup finals though, things changed for the worse.

Vancouver went a paltry 2-33 on the power play in the finals helping drop their power play percentage overall in the playoffs to 20.4%. While that number will still look gaudy their 6% effectiveness in the finals is what will stick out like a sore thumb. In three different games in the finals their power play was morbidly terrible.

In Game 1 they went 0-6 but still won. In Games 3 and 4 however, their misery with the extra man hurt them badly. In Game 3 the power play was 0-8 and in Game 4 it was another 0-6 performance. In games where they needed goals by the bunches, they were afforded the opportunity to score them and failed miserably. That lack of execution and inability to produce was their ultimate undoing.

4. A lack of defensive cohesion
Coming into this series the Canucks defense was one of their points of pride and strength. As the series wore down, it began to be a microcosm of what they dealt with all through the season as injuries and suspensions took their toll. Dan Hamhuis’ Game 1 injury proved to be a killer as his defensive ability as a top four guy was lost and forced others into roles they’re not accustomed to.

Aaron Rome’s foolish hit on Nathan Horton not only ignited the Bruins but further weakened his own team’s depth forcing coach Alain Vigneault to figure out whether Keith Ballard or Chris Tanev was going to hurt them less. Having to rely on Andrew Alberts for key defensive stopping minutes isn’t really anyone’s ideal solution to winning games.

Add in Christian Ehrhoff’s bum shoulder and turnovers all over the ice as well as Alex Edler’s two broken fingers he played with in Game 7 and you’re left with a blue line corps that was stretched to its limits and gassed when it was all said and done. With so much shuffling even the Canucks’ tremendous depth was tested to the limits. Having these things come up in the finals where even the smallest mistakes get magnified made life impossible for Vancouver against a very tight and dedicated Bruins team.


We know everyone will be eager to blow up parts of the Canucks and will be quick to throw certain big name players under the bus for not performing, but vast changes aren’t needed here. This team will learn by losing on this stage. Whether or not they’re psychologically capable of dealing with such a crushing defeat is the question here. Professional athletes should be able to bounce back from this but sometimes getting back to the Stanley Cup finals can prove to be just as hard as winning it. Coming out of the Western Conference, that road is always a bit trickier and physically demanding.

Vancouver will again be a top team, but until they get a bit tougher mentally and learn to knock it off with the overly dramatic play to win calls from the officials, life will be that much harder for them.

What Went Wrong: San Jose Sharks

Antti Niemi, Roberto Luongo

Another year, another playoffs ends with the San Jose Sharks getting bounced out unceremoniously in the Western Conference finals. This time the Sharks were bounced out in five games by the Vancouver Canucks and while it didn’t play out like the butt whooping a five game series might dictate it to be, the Sharks still had their share of problems that forced them to miss out on another opportunity to make the Stanley Cup finals. Making it this far in the playoffs is an accomplishment, but for San Jose they’re continued bridesmaid status in the West is getting a bit old. So what went wrong for the Sharks? We’ve got some ideas.

1. They couldn’t stop the Sedin line
Their first problem and their biggest problem was that they couldn’t do anything to contain Henrik Sedin, Daniel Sedin, and Alex Burrows. Those three combined for 24 points in this series alone with Henrik getting 12 of them (one goal, 11 assists). Getting picked apart essentially by one line and one defenseman (Kevin Bieksa and his four goals this series) shows that either those guys were that much better or a total lack of defensive ability and accountability to keep up with those guys.

Then again, getting beaten by your opponents best players when they’re the better team shouldn’t be that big of a deal but given how the Sedins were shutdown by Nashville (Shea Weber and Ryan Suter were indeed that good), perhaps a little more videotape scouting would’ve worked for the Sharks.

2. Defense not nearly physical enough
One major issue for San Jose is that they flat out weren’t physical enough to slow down the Canucks. While Douglas Murray served to be an imposing figure and dished out some monstrous hits of his own (18 in the series to be exact) the next few players that got physical were forwards. Ryane Clowe and Devin Setoguchi each were credited with 11 hits while Dany Heatley and Jamal Mayers were credited with ten each. The next best defensemen with hits were Niclas Wallin with nine and Marc-Edouard Vlasic with seven.

That lack of physicality along the blue line proved to be a problem in their own end because when you give guys like the Sedins the time and space to cycle they’re going to find ways to beat you. Sure enough that’s just what they did. Visions of the Sedins passing and skating circles around the Sharks zone should be enough to give Sharks GM Doug Wilson nightmares enough to do something about that during the offseason. Douglas Murray can do a lot of things but he can’t contain twins on his own.

3. Thornton and Marleau step up while others stepped back
It’s eerily similar how things played out in this year’s Western final as compared to last year’s that saw the Sharks bounced in four games. Last year Patrick Marleau and Dan Boyle were the only two Sharks players to do anything against the Blackhawks with Marleau scoring five goals and adding one assist while Boyle had five assists. This year it was all about Marleau, Boyle, and Joe Thornton.

Marleau had five goals and two assists against Vancouver while Thornton had a goal and five assists while Boyle had a goal and four helpers. Everyone else? Virtually non-existent.

Dany Heatley was an abject nightmare offensively adding just one assist during this series. He was so bad he was bumped down to the third line where he played better as a checking forward than he did as a guy meant to score goals. Considering he makes $7.5 million a year, he’s brutally overpaid to do that kind of work. Joe Pavelski has had his struggles since the first round and had just three assists against Vancouver. Devin Setoguchi only found the net once in this series after terrorizing the Red Wings and it took a risky play from Roberto Luongo to help make that happen. Rookie phenom Logan Couture was invisible for most of the series and even playoff-long hero Ryane Clowe had just two goals against the Canucks. With that sort of erratic help, it was the guys with the most belabored reputations that were left hanging once again in the Western Conference finals.

Marleau and Thornton historically get crap thrown their way for not playing big in the playoffs, but this time around they were let down by their teammates. For Marleau it’s especially painful as he took a beating for not playing big enough against Detroit for the second year in a row only to be one of the only guys to show up in the following round. Life is tough that way.

4. Antti Niemi wasn’t good enough
It’s tough when a goalie doesn’t have a lot of action to face over the course of a game and that’s certainly the case for Antti Niemi against Vancouver. Over the five games in the series, Niemi faced 153 shots, good for just over 30 shots per game. While that amount of work might seem healthy, the last few games saw Niemi lulled to sleep by the patient Vancouver attack. Niemi faced 38 shots in each of the first two games, 30 in Game 3, 13 (!) in Game 4, and 34 through four and a half periods in Game 5.

Niemi allowed 20 goals in the series giving him a 3.68 goals against average and an abysmal .869 save percentage, including seven goals against in Game 2. Those kinds of numbers aren’t going to win you anything in the playoffs. For as good as Niemi was against the Red Wings, he reverted back to the form he had against the Kings in the first round. That sort of play nearly cost the Sharks that opening round series and against a superior Canucks team, the writing was on the wall.


The Sharks have a good thing going there but they’ll need to make some small changes to be able to get out of the Western Conference next year. They’ll need to get a little tougher on defense, they’ll need to find a way to properly motivate Dany Heatley into being a full time scoring threat. Perhaps a little heart-to-heart with Patrick Marleau there would do wonders as Marleau, outside of the Detroit series, was great all season long. People will want to fully blame goaltending but Antti Niemi is solid there and more than capable of leading a winner. The Sharks will be back next year and while the playoff loser tag will hang around them, someday it’ll all come together.

What Went Wrong: Detroit Red Wings

Detroit Red Wings v San Jose Sharks - Game Seven

Much like with the Chicago Blackhawks in the first round, it’s tough to hammer on a team that went seven games in a series, especially after rallying after being down 3-0 in the series to start, but for the Detroit Red Wings, there’s enough to pick on. So just what went wrong for Detroit against San Jose? We’ve got a few things to pick on.

1. The Obvious
You can’t get into a 3-0 hole in a series and expect to win. It sounds simple enough but last year’s Flyers managed change people’s perceptions and leave the glimmer of hope open that things can change. As this year’s playoffs have shown, dreams don’t always come true and the miracle doesn’t always come to fruition. Asking any team to win four games in a row whether it’s in the regular season or the playoffs is asking a lot of them.

While the Wings did well to do their part, it just didn’t pay off. In a series as close as this was with six games decided by one goal, they were about as close as they could to pulling off wins in four games but just didn’t get the breaks.

2. No secondary scoring threats
The play of Nicklas Lidstrom, Pavel Datsyuk, and Henrik Zetterberg in this series was outstanding. Datsyuk led the way with nine points (2 goals, 7 assists), Zetterberg had eight points (3g, 5a), and Lidstrom was the top goal scorer with four goals and two assists. The next best? Not so good.

Detroit had six different players finish the series with three points and while that’s a good spread out amount of help, not getting that little bit extra from any of Dan Cleary, Tomas Holmstrom, Todd Bertuzzi, or Valtteri Filppula hurt. As dominant as the Wings’ top three were, the rest of the gang was doing their part to pick their moments. Getting that kind of production is great, but ultimately it just wasn’t enough.

3. Jimmy Howard got hot too late
It’s tough to get upset with how Jimmy Howard played in this series. A lot of Detroit fans might want to blame the goalie since that’s the usual way things go. This time around, Howard was great in the last four games of the series but his first three just weren’t the same sort of dominating level of play.

With Antti Niemi playing out of his mind on the other side of the ice, Howard had no room for error and in the first three games of the series he just wasn’t on the same level. You can’t quite hold that against him, it’s just a bit of bad luck on the part of the Wings. Howard could’ve used some better help in front of him early on from guys like Ruslan Salei and Brad Stuart, but things tightened up later on. Early mistakes ultimately cost Detroit a shot at the Western finals.


Detroit had a tremendous playoffs. Sweeping Phoenix out was impressive and having to deal with an equally as impressive San Jose team in the second round proved to be all that it was meant to be.

Detroit will be back next year. Mike Babcock is one of the best coaches in the business and Ken Holland will get to work in the offseason trying to convince Nick Lidstrom to come back for one more year while getting Dan Cleary and Todd Bertuzzi healthy. They’ll need to sign a goalie to backup Jimmy Howard and figure out what they’re going to do elsewhere on defense. Niklas Kronwall’s emergence in the playoffs as a big time blue liner gives the Wings hope there, but if there’s one thing we learned in these playoffs and over the years it’s to never count out the Detroit Red Wings.

What Went Wrong: Nashville Predators

Henrik Sedin, Shea Weber

Nashville made their deepest run in the playoffs in franchise history this year making it to the second round. They won their first overtime playoff game in team history and while it’s sad to get bounced out of the playoffs, the Predators ability to take the slow and steady pace towards overall franchise improvement continues to grind along. Much like how the team plays on the ice the Predators rise into making their presence known and felt in the NHL it’s been a rugged but rewarding affair.

Still, in spite of what they achieved this season they bowed out in six games to Vancouver and there were some obvious problems along the way.

1. Malfunctioned power play
The Predators made a living off of the man advantage against Anaheim in the first round. The Ducks would make mistakes and the Predators appropriately made them pay for it. This time around against Vancouver, facing up to a tough defense proved to be a real challenge. Vancouver’s penalty kill had a feast on the Predators holding them to going 1-21 through the six games.

Scoring on 4.7% of your power plays isn’t going to win you many games, nevermind a series. While Shea Weber and Ryan Suter were able to bomb away from the point, Vancouver’s ability to defend guys crashing the net and blocking shots (90 in the series) made life harder on them. The Canucks gave them their chances to break through and make a difference

2. Roles reversed
The Predators came into this series hoping to get big games out of Mike Fisher and Sergei Kostitsyn offensively while guys like David Legwand and Joel Ward defended against the Sedins to keep them off the board. Instead, Fisher and Kostitsyn were terrible. Each of them had just one assist in the series while Fisher was a -3 on his plus/minus and Kostitsyn was a -1 and hide-your-eyes bad when caught out in a must-defend situation.

Meanwhile, Ward and Legwand were the Predators top scorers while still shutting down the Sedins. Ward was a revelation scoring four goals and adding four assists. Legwand had four goals and an assist in the series. No other goal scorers for Nashville had more than one. If the Preds were getting that production out of Ward and Legwand in addition to their better offensive players showing up, who knows how this series turns out. Instead, they were essentially all they had. This leads us into our third point.

3. No game breaker to be found
The Predators just flat out didn’t have a dominating offensive presence. They didn’t have one all season long and relied on team play and grinding games out to survive on as few goals as possible. When you’re in the bottom third in goals scored that’s just how life has to be. In the playoffs, the lack of offensive force crushed them against Vancouver. Guys like Patrick Kane, Patrick Sharp, and Marian Hossa helped raise hell against the Canucks in the first round but without a real name threat for Nashville, Vancouver could stick to their system and close up shop around Roberto Luongo.

Fisher and Kostitsyn weren’t threats, Jordin Tootoo lost his ability to generate action and no one else aside from Ward and Legwand found the net regularly. It wouldn’t kill the Predators to find a way to get a power forward force that could net 30-40 goals a year, but good luck finding one. The Predators will have to hope there’s someone in their talented system that can evolve into that game breaking force.


On the upside for Nashville, this playoff run has given the team and city a reason to get really excited about the team. Barry Trotz has the team well versed in his system and they play the brand of game that gives them success in the playoffs. Pekka Rinne proved himself to be a great goalie while defensemen Ryan Suter and Shea Weber run the show along the blue line. A team filled with grinding forwards, while a pain to play against, doesn’t offer them the ability to break a game open in a big way offensively though.
The Predators have smart coaching and smart management and they’ll make the right tweaks to improve the team. They’ve been doing it all along now and there’s no reason to think they won’t keep it going now.

What Went Wrong: Philadelphia Flyers

Philadelphia Flyers v Boston Bruins - Game Four

It’s not the finish to the season the Flyers were aiming for after surprisingly making the Stanley Cup final last year. Finishing as the second seed in the Eastern Conference this year meant that the Flyers had high hopes of returning to the Cup final and winning their first Cup since 1975. Instead, they met the business end of a broom thanks to the Bruins and they’re left to wonder what exactly went wrong.

Don’t worry guys, we’ll take care of that.

1. Yes, the goaltending stunk
Let’s just point and laugh at the elephant in the room right now. Goaltending was terrible. Take a look at Brian Boucher’s numbers in this series.

5.26 goals against average, .846 save percentage, 12 goals allowed on 78 shots.

Those numbers are indefensible when breaking things down. Starting Sergei Bobrovsky in Game 4 was a move Peter Laviolette had to try to turn things around. Unfortunately for him, the series was already over with because the Flyers had a lot of other problems elsewhere on the ice on top of being terrible in goal. With no one having any confidence in anyone out there, it’s tough to come up with great performances in goal. Game 2 was the Flyers only real shot at a win and they still came up short in overtime. The other three losses weren’t even close.

2. But so did the defense
Philly’s defense was also to fault for their problems. We’ve yelled about how the Bruins plan of attack flustered the Flyers and made them run around wildly in their own end chasing after pucks and players all at once. Not having a healthy Chris Pronger to lead them did make a difference, but with the margin of defeat the Flyers were losing by it didn’t much matter. The Flyers defense being in the shape it was in caused a domino effect. All season long the Flyers goalies, regardless of who was in net, all put up similar numbers and relied on the guys in front of them to help make life easier. The Bruins figured out that by pressing the play and pressuring the Flyers in all zones that they’d get them to break down and leave openings all over the ice. They did that and it happened a lot to the tune of 20 goals in four games. Giving up an average of five goals per game isn’t winning anyone anything.

3. And the offense was brutal too
For as many goals as the Flyers were giving up to Boston, they had a problem of their own in that they couldn’t score either. Tim Thomas was outstanding through the series as the Flyers threw an average of just over 37 shots per game at him. 149 shots in all in the series and Thomas allowed just seven goals. That’t tough to keep up with but the Flyers needed their top players to flat out be better. Daniel Briere disappeared against Boston as did Mike Richards and Claude Giroux. James van Riemsdyk was the lone Flyer player to do anything in this series as he scored three of the team’s seven goals. You need the full team to put it together to beat the Bruins and the Flyers, instead, had one guy consistently bringing it. The Flyers had more than a few glaring issues in this series, but the lack of goals flew under the radar thanks how bad everything else went.

4. No character either
We’re not really big fans of putting a stake on intangible things like “heart” and “pride” but this Flyers team seemed to truly lack any of that against Boston. After getting pushed to the brink by Buffalo in the first round and showing some of that classic Flyers swagger, they had none of that against the Bruins. Instead, you had players taking dumb penalties (like Dan Carcillo did in Game 4), Chris Pronger lashing out in Game 1 while ending up a -3, and Scott Hartnell going after Zdeno Chara only to turtle after getting Chara’s ire showed that the Flyers just lacked something to unite them against a very motivated Bruins team. It’s not the brand of Flyers hockey we’ve gotten used to and perhaps next time around they’ll get a bit more out of Mike Richards as the captain.


Philadelphia is clearly a very talented team. There’s a lot of offensive firepower here that’s young and itching to break out in the future. From Ville Leino, James van Riemsdyk, and Claude Giroux that’s a fantastic array of young talent. A healthy Jeff Carter may have helped out more against Boston and with Mike Richards there’s no reason to be concerned about those parts of the Flyers lineup. All eyes will be on GM Paul Holmgren in the offseason to see if he addresses the team’s goaltending situation. The Flyers have skated by with average to poor goalies for far too long and those issues came home to roost in this series.