Tag: vote of confidence

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Maple Leafs GM Brian Burke gives Ron Wilson the vote of confidence

There are many phrases, statements and sentences in life that are often considered “a kiss of death.”

Take relationships, for instance. If a woman is adamant about calling you a “really nice guy,” you might as well change your zip code to the “friend zone.” When either party begins a conversation with “We need to talk … ” you probably won’t be speaking much longer.

Sports probably maintain quite a few examples, but the best one might be when a general manager or owner gives a coach a vote of confidence. More often than not, that same GM hands that supposedly safe bench boss his walking papers about a month or so later. In the end, the vote of confidence isn’t all that different than a death row appeal – it’s merely a temporary reprieve.

The most recent dead coach walking seems to be Toronto coach Ron Wilson. The local media is notorious for turning on the experienced manager, but considering the fact that the team lost eight of its last night games, the calls for his head aren’t crazy. Yet, much like Anaheim Ducks GM Bob Murray and coach Randy Carlyle, Brian Burke is pointing his finger at the players, not Wilson. Here is what Burke said to TSN.

“If you watch the game films and show me one thing Ronnie did wrong, then come back and ask me about it. The answer to your question is yes, the coach is safe,” Burke told The Star at a sports management conference that he was co-chairing.


“Did Ron play poorly last night? No. Why don’t you guys focus on the players who played poorly last night instead of questioning the coach,” Burke said to The Star. “We have players who aren’t performing at a proper level on a nightly basis. That has to change.”

Honestly, I think that if anyone should get canned, it’s Burke. Yet what would that really accomplish? The Leafs are a work in progress and while many mistakes were made, the story is still incomplete. Perhaps with some patience, Burke and Wilson can figure things out.

Unless they both dug themselves a hole that is too deep.

Ducks GM Bob Murray puts blame for team’s lousy start on players, not coach Randy Carlyle


Anaheim Ducks GM Bob Murray can often be outspoken with the media. It’s great for generating headlines and juicy stories considering the fact that general managers usually speak as if they’re reading off of cliche-laden cue cards, but you wonder if the team might benefit from him staying out of the papers.

Regardless, Murray provided some rather interesting comments to Eric Stephens of the OC Register. In a nutshell, the occasionally fiery front office man exonerated Ducks head coach Randy Carlyle while throwing the roster he constructed under the bus.

Of course, this is usually the time when I point how the dreaded “vote of confidence” is usually a kiss of death for head coaches, but let’s at least give the Ducks GM the benefit of the doubt and take a look at his revealing statements.

“I’ve got total faith in Randy,” Murray said. “He’s won a Stanley Cup. That’s not an issue here. It’s up to the players. Enough excuses. Talking about coaches and things gives them an excuse when they have no excuses in my eye.”

In fact, Murray went as far as to say that the team might make a major change via a trade or other transaction.

Murray was also quite clear that he isn’t averse to making a major personnel shake-up if the Ducks don’t start winning soon as he pointed to an upcoming stretch where they play three straight at home and five of the next six at Honda Center.

In other words, the thought breaking off one part of the young core of Ryan Getzlaf, Corey Perry and Bobby Ryan in order to bring in a major piece and shake a team out of its slumber may be entertained.

“Fair question,” he said. “Eventually, that’s going to have to be in front of this group if they don’t get their act together. It’s going to be right in front of them. If they don’t know that then, well, I feel sorry for them.”

Murray might be talking tough about getting rid of Getzlaf, Perry or Ryan but here’s the bottom line: the trio might be flawed in some areas, but they are the strength of this team along with goalie Jonas Hiller.

The Ducks simply need to surround them with quality role players, a depth scorer or two and (the hardest part) a defense that can help clean up their messes (especially on the penalty kill). Anaheim allows a league-high 38.8 shots per game, a startling number that is three shots worse than the second worst team in the NHL (Atlanta at 35.6). You cannot blame effort or preparedness alone for those kind of numbers; it’s clear that the Ducks are just a mess in their own zone.

That’s the kind of thing that falls to the coach and general manager most of all, not subjective concepts such as effort or elbow grease. Perhaps you could question the decision to make Getzlaf their captain – yes, he’s their best player, but he’s not always the kind of guy that sets a good example with his penchant take bad penalties and turn the puck over – but that also is as much about front office decision as it is about the character of guys on the roster.

The Ducks lost three of their lost four games and their 4-7-1 record parks them deep in the Western Conference cellar. It’s early in the season, but they need to make good on their four game homestand. The problem is that each of those four contests are tough; they already suffered a 5-2 loss to San Jose and host resurgent Tampa Bay, Pittsburgh and pesky old Nashville. Losing all four of those games is not outside the realm of possibility.

If they fall apart during that stretch, the Quest to Find Who is Truly to Blame will progress from “dreaded vote of confidence” to “heads begin to roll.” I can’t help but guess that the team’s talented young trio enjoys better job security than their addled head coach as well as the general manager who wasn’t the boss until the team started missing the playoffs.

Either way, it could get ugly in Anaheim before things get better.

Reason to worry? Devils GM gives coach John MacLean a vote of confidence

New Jersey Devils Introduce John MacLean As Head Coach

Devils head coach John MacLean has already had his first season as a coach with enough drama and intrigue to fill a career and a lot of that is thanks to Ilya Kovalchuk. From waiting it out to get Kovalchuk officially re-signed in New Jersey to making him a healthy scratch on Saturday night, MacLean’s had enough attention brought to him. Throw in the Devils shaky start to the season and you’ve got a potential recipe for employment disaster.

Devils GM Lou Lamoriello has a bit of a dubious history for changing coaches if he sees fit whether or not the team is winning or losing and with the Devils in seeming disarray to start the year, fans are wondering if, perhaps, John MacLean might have something to worry about. Depending on what you think of a GM’s vote of confidence, you might think he’s got a lot to worry about as Lamoriello threw his support behind MacLean. ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun finds out whether or not Lamoriello was even tempted to make a coaching change.

“There’s no thought whatsoever,” Lamoriello told ESPN.com Monday. “John has done an exceptional job. I have no issue with him. Our record certainly isn’t what any of us like, but it has nothing to do with coaching.”

Kovalchuk, who signed a 15-year, $100 million contract in the offseason, had tongues wagging around the league Saturday night when he was made a healthy scratch before a 6-1 loss to the Buffalo Sabres. While no one involved would explain why exactly the decision was made, reports suggest he was late for a team meeting Saturday morning.

Either way, Lamoriello backed the decision.

“I am totally supportive,” Lamoriello said. “Without question I was aware of it … and without question I was supportive. So enough said.”

It would be awfully early in the season, not to mention MacLean’s NHL coaching career, to decide to send him packing so it’s worthwhile to see how MacLean adjusts and can right the ship in New Jersey. Of course, if the team continues to play inconsistently and the team stays mired in mediocrity, Lamoriello’s hand may be forced to make a change. After all, one of MacLean’s assistant coaches is former multiple-time head coach Larry Robinson so if things do stay sour, there’s someone that Lamoriello is comfortable with right there on the bench already.

For MacLean, getting Lamoriello’s support is a good thing to have as he makes for a pretty tough boss. Then again, if it’s the stereotypical “vote of confidence” and it serves more as a public warning to get it together, it’s doubtful that that would surprise too many people.