Tag: Victor Oreskovich

Tim Thomas;  Victor Oreskovich

Minor moves: Panthers and Coyotes make deal, Canucks sign Oreskovich

As training camp slowly approaches, there were a few minor deals around the NHL as teams look to round out their teams (and organizational depth) for the upcoming season.

The Florida Panthers and Phoenix Coyotes completed a minor swap of prospects. The Panthers sent goaltender Marc Cheverie to the Coyotes in exchange for Justin Bernhardt. Both players spent the majority of last season with the ECHL affiliates. Bernhardt had 6 goals and 25 points in 47 games for the Las Vegas Wranglers, while Cheverie put up a 13-9-5 record and 3.11 goals against average with the Cincinnati Cyclones. Cheverie also saw action in 15 games with Florida’s AHL affiliate in Rochester—posting an underwhelming 2-7-1 record and a 3.91 goals against average. He goes from the Panthers (who have Jacob Markstrom waiting in the wings) to the Coyotes that have been impressed with goaltending prospect Mark Visentin.  Best of luck breaking through.

Both players will look to get their careers on the right track with their new organizations.

Up in the Northwest, the defending President’s Trophy winning Vancouver Canucks rounded out their roster by signing winger Victor Oreskovich to a one-year, two-way deal worth $605,000. Oreskovich appeared with both Manitoba (AHL) and the Canucks last season before carving out a niche for himself in Vancouver on the 4th line. A quick look at the roster gives the Canucks about 32 players who can fight it out for a spot on the 4th line next season.

Vancouver Canucks assistant general manager Laurence Gilman commented to the Vancouver Sun in regards to the signing:

“Victor made great strides last year, but this a year to establish himself. It’s a short term and as a result he has the ability, if he performs to a level, to use this year for a spring board for greater things.”

Oreskovich was originally acquired by the Canucks along with Keith Ballard from the Florida Panthers for Michael Grabner, Steve Bernier, and a first round pick (Quinton Howden). The 25-year-old Whiby, ON native only played in 16 regular season games last season; but grabbed a hold of his opportunity with the big club by appearing in 19 games in the postseason. While still looking for his first goal in a Canucks uniform – he only had three assists in 35 total games last season – Oreskovich is the type of player who uses his 6’3” frame to battle down low, wear down opponents, and play a physical brand of hockey that is welcomed on a team that’s stacked with offensive talent.

How Manny Malhotra’s comeback game went

Manny Malhotra

Manny Malhotra’s comeback for Game 2 of the Stanley Cup finals after suffering a terrible eye injury in mid-March tonight  is going to be one of the lasting memories we’ll have regardless of how things turn out for his Vancouver Canucks. Given that Malhotra very nearly lost the eyesight in his left eye thanks to taking a puck in the eye in a game against Colorado, seeing him play tonight was something truly special.

Malhotra played just 7:26 of tonight’s game but compared to the ice time the guy he replaced, Alexandre Bolduc, got in Game 1 (less than two minutes) it’s a virtual eternity for a guy playing his first game in nearly three months. While it’s just one game he had the jitters going big time tonight but settled in fast.

“I was excited I was going to have the chance to play, but probably the most nervous I’ve been in my entire career,” he said.

“I guess I really didn’t settle down ’til after my first shift,” Malhotra said. “It was obviously a great feeling, the ovation I got for my first shift. I think it kind of put a little bit more nerves on me, wanting to do something out there, execute. Once I got out there, I felt a little bit better, started to skate.”

As for how he played, coach Alain Vigneault said before tonight’s game that he’d specialize in faceoffs and play on the fourth line. He did both of those things and did wonders in the faceoff circle going 6-7 (86%) on the draws he took tonight. The lone man to beat him on a faceoff? Rich Peverley. Malhotra took his draws against seven different Bruins and beat each of Greg Campbell, Chris Kelly, Michael Ryder, Mark Recchi, Patrice Bergeron, and David Krejci once apiece.

While Malhotra didn’t score any points, that’s not his job out there. Defending and winning faceoffs is his game and while he’s not logging the big ice time he did during the regular season (he averaged 16:10 of ice time this year) it’s a good first game back for him. The Canucks can’t expect that he’ll come back immediately and play the same way, but tonight was encouraging especially for coach Vigneault.

“It was a real happy moment for our whole group to be able to put Manny in the lineup and to have him play the way he did. He did exactly what we all expected. He was real good on face-offs. He was good on the ice. He created a scoring chance. That line played more minutes than throughout the San Jose series and I think obviously more than in the first game against Boston,” Vigneault said.

“So I’m excited to have him back and I think he’s only going to get better as we move forward here.”

If Vigneault is that encouraged by things, seeing how he’ll respond on the road in Game 3 will provide a major league test for him. As Malhotra has shown in his comeback from this injury, you can never count him out. As for the Bruins, they have to be worried that the Canucks are getting a major contributor to their cause back and in fine playing form. That sort of thing happening for the team up two games to none can be disarming.

Manny Malhotra takes part in morning skate, will be game-time decision for Game 2

Henrik Sedin, Raffi Torres, Alex Burrows, Jeff Tambellini

While his spot on the roster is still in question, the chances of Vancouver Canucks two-way center Manny Malhotra completing his improbable comeback keep increasing. The latest signs of improvement came after the Canucks’ morning skate Saturday, as Malhotra upgraded his status from day-to-day to a game-time decision.

Dan Murphy points out that Malhotra skated with fourth-liners Victor Oreskovich and Jeff Tambellini in the early practice session, which implies that Alexandre Bolduc could be the odd man out if Malhotra does play in Game 2 tonight.

Malhotra’s faceoff winning skills and all-around defensive abilities could ease the burden on Selke Trophy candidate Ryan Kesler, whose two-way play was counted upon that much more in Malhotra’s absence. An already strong Canucks penalty kill would receive a boost if Malhotra can play, although it’s worth noting that the team would probably try to ease him back into the action.

Again, it’s not a sure thing that he’ll play tonight, though. Here is what he told reporters today, via NHL.com.

“I’m honestly not trying to send you guys on a wild goose chase. That’s just the nature of the situation right now,” Malhotra said. “I felt good yesterday skating. Felt good this morning. So, again, hopefully, I’ll continue throughout the day.”

The Mississauga native admitted it will be an emotional night for him if he can play in his first game in two-and-a-half months.

“It’s obviously an incredible position to be in,” Malhotra said. “I think everybody that’s on the ice tonight has dreamed about (the Stanley Cup Final) at some point or another in their career, growing up. I realize the significance of the moment.

“At the same time, once the puck’s dropped, I’m going to have to just, again, bring it back to basics. Just another game, got to do the things I’ve done my whole career.”

Malhotra plans on taking part in the team’s pre-game skate, so we might not know whether or not he’ll play until right around the time the first puck drops. You can follow the action tonight on NBC at 8 p.m. ET.

More Canucks injuries: Manny Malhotra out indefinitely after eye surgery


The Canucks have persevered all season dealing with injuries. They’ve lost more than 300 man-games thanks to injuries to numerous defensemen and a handful of forwards. Last night, Manny Malhotra was struck in the face by a shot and had to be tended to immediately. Malhotra is a key member of the team’s third line and one of their better checking forwards.

Today, the Canucks updated his status saying that he had to undergo eye surgery and he’ll be out of the lineup indefinitely. Coach Alain Vigneault said they’ll know better what sort of timetable they can set for him after a couple of days, but for now Vancouver will again have to fill a hole in the lineup from within. They will miss Malhotra’s presence mightily.

Of course, an injury like this leads us to the debate over visors. Many players hate them, but anyone coming up through junior hockey and the AHL now makes it to the NHL wearing one for their entire career up to that point. A day will come when visors become mandatory for the sake of the players (much like it did for helmets in 1979) but for players in the NHL now, they seem to take to visors only after suffering a scare personally. Such is life, but you can see this eventually coming one day.

Vancouver called up Victor Oreskovich from Manitoba in the AHL to fill his spot on the roster. As for how Vancouver’s done this season in spite of injuries, you have to give Vigneault a ton of credit for keeping the team calm, cool, and cranking out wins consistently.

While the Northwest Division hasn’t exactly been great this year, getting the Canucks to both be the first team to clinch a playoff spot this year and win the division is great accomplishment in spite of all the injury problems. Vancouver’s 103 points is best in the NHL by ten over Philadelphia giving the Canucks the clear shot at the Presidents Trophy. If this translates into a Stanley Cup for the Canucks, expect them to erect statues for Vigneault in Vancouver overnight.