Tag: Vezina Trophy

tim thomas vezina

Poll: Who will win the 2012 Vezina Trophy?


As mentioned earlier, the NHL announced its Vezina Trophy finalists this morning — New York Rangers’ Henrik Lundqvist, Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick and Nashville’s Pekka Rinne.

The nominations came as no real surprise given how well each goaltender has played this season, and what unique resumes each brings to the table: Lundqvist was the MVP of the best team in the Eastern Conference and the No. 2 squad in the NHL, Quick won 35 games and made the playoffs despite L.A. having the league’s second-worst offense and Rinne played more than any goalie in the league, leading in appearances (73) and wins (43).

Before we get to the vote, some things to consider:

— NHL GMs vote on the Vezina, not the Professional Hockey Writers Association. This is key, because there’s a long-held belief that Western Conference goalies (see: Quick, Jonathan) fail to get proper recognition because by the time they play, most GMs are passed out in a recliner.

— To that point: 17 of the last 20 Vezina winners have come from the Eastern Conference.

— Snubs? Not really. This has to be one of the strongest (and most obvious) trio of finalists in recent memory. You could make the case for Phoenix’s Mike Smith or St. Louis’ Brian Elliott — both had outstanding seasons — but to do that you’d have to remove one of Lundqvist, Quick and/or Rinne…and that’s a tough sell.

— None of the three finalists have won a Vezina before. This is Quick’s first-ever nomination; Rinne was a finalist for the first time last season while this is Lundqvist’s fourth time at the dance. Could be why many figure it’s his award to lose.

— The last Rangers goalie to win a Vezina was John Vanbiesbrouck in 1985-86.

— No King and/or Predator has ever won.

Okay, to the poll…

Lundqvist, Quick and Rinne are your Vezina Trophy finalists

Quick Lundqvist

In a year where there was no shortage of outstanding goaltending performances, the NHL has narrowed its Vezina Trophy candidate list to three ‘tenders — New York Rangers’ Henrik Lundqvist, Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick and Nashville’s Pekka Rinne.

The trio of candidates ensures a first-time winner, though Lundqvist has been nominated three times prior while Rinne was a finalist in 2010-11. Quick has never been nominated for the Vezina.

As for the candidates…


He appeared in 62 games for the Rangers — winning a career-high 39 — and backstopped New York to first place in the Eastern Conference since 1993-94. “King Henrik” finished with a 1.97 goals-against average and a .930 save percentage, finishing in the top four in wins, GAA, save percentage and shutouts (eight).


The 26-year-old carried the Kings throughout the season and was instrumental in getting them the eighth and final playoff spot in the West. He played a career-high 69 games and had 35 of L.A.’s 40 wins this season, finishing with a 1.95 GAA, .929 save percentage and a stunning 10 (yeah, ten) shutouts.

More, from NHL.com:

His accomplishments came with almost no margin for error, as the Kings were 29th in the League in scoring at 2.29 goals per game. And while he had 34 losses in regulation, overtime or shootouts, the Kings scored two goals or fewer in 15 of them, and one goal or less in nine.


The lanky Finn was the league’s workhorse netminder this year, playing in 73 games and recording an NHL-best 43 wins. He was seventh with a .923 save percentage while facing the most shots in the League (2,153) and also had a 2.39 GAA with five shutouts.

PHT Related

Poll: Who will win the 2012 Vezina Trophy?

Greatest goalie generation? Why this is a special time for American netminding

Boston Bruins Victory Parade

If you ask me, this is a golden era of goaltending for hockey. While the “Dead Puck Era” produced better numbers in many cases, it’s hard to imagine a time in which so many teams had so many solid-to-great goalies. Maybe that might make it tougher for individuals to stand out, but there really aren’t a whole lot of teams who are just flat-out “lost” at the position anymore. There aren’t many squads that need to camouflage Dan Cloutier-type liabilities in net.

We could debate the bigger picture merits of goalies all day, but there’s one thing you’ll have a really tough time making me dismiss: this is the highest point for American hockey goaltending ever. One could argue that is true from both a quality and quantity standpoint. With all due respect to the legendary Olympic run of Jim Craig, scattered talents throughout older times and a solid recently past era that included Tom Barrasso, John Vanbiesbrouck and Mike Richter, this is a peak generation for U.S. netminding.

Let’s take a look at a list of the most prominent active American goaltenders to drive the point home.

Tim Thomas

It’s been said over and over again, but it never really gets old: Thomas put together a combined playoff and postseason run for the ages this year. He generated a record-breaking .938 save percentage during the regular season and somehow found a way to top that by reaching the .940 mark in the playoffs. Oh yeah, he also won the Vezina Trophy, Conn Smythe and Stanley Cup in the process. It isn’t outrageous to wonder if Thomas literally put together the best single season and playoff run an NHL goalie ever enjoyed, although it’s tough to be sure because different scoring eras fudge the numbers (we’re looking at you, high-scoring 1980’s).

Thomas might not be a traditional butterfly goalie, but his “redneck style” and resilient journey to the NHL make him the American dream in leg pads.

source: Getty ImagesRyan Miller

If you just flat-out refuse to admit that an unorthodox goalie is the best in the world, then Miller provides another example of an American netminder who is clearly at the top of the form. While Thomas owned just about everything that had to to with 2010-11, Miller was the darling of the 2009-10 season, including the 2010 Olympics. He carried the U.S. to a surprising silver medal after helping them make it within a famous Sidney Crosby overtime goal of the gold and took home the 2010 Vezina Trophy as well.

For those counting at home, the last three Vezina Trophies went to American goalies: Thomas twice and Miller once. The closest example of that happening before was when Barrasso won it in 1984 and Vanbiesbrouck took it in 86.

source: Getty ImagesJimmy Howard

This class of American goalies runs deep. Howard might not roll of your tongue when you’re naming the NHL’s elite, but he’s the present and future of Detroit’s goaltending. The past has been pretty sweet, too; he’s currently riding two consecutive 37-win seasons. After his stats slipped a bit from the 09-10 to 10-11 regular season, Howard responded with a .923 save percentage in the 2011 playoffs.

Jonathan Quick

Jonathan Bernier couldn’t win the Jonathan Championship from Quick last season and it’s going to be tough for Bernier to usurp the steady American next season. Quick  won 39 games in 09-10 and 35 last season while improving his individual numbers along the way. The Connecticut product could rise in many peoples’ eyes if he comes through in what looks to be a promising 2011-12 season for the Kings.

source: APCraig Anderson

The jury seems to be out on Anderson, but one cannot deny his potential after he carried the Colorado Avalanche to a surprise playoff berth in 09-10. The Ottawa Senators made a big investment in Anderson and he might just have the tools to make that pay off.

Ben Bishop, Brian Boucher, Jack Campbell, Scott Clemmensen, Ty Conklin, Rick DiPietro, Brent Johnson and Al Montoya

The long list of backups and/or emerging prospects might push this era over the edge. Boucher and Johnson rank among the better journeyman backups in the league while Conklin isn’t far behind. Bishop is an over-sized goalie for St. Louis while Clemmensen signed an over-sized contract with Florida. DiPietro’s health is a problem and his contract is a punchline, but there was a time when he was an All-Star goalie. Campbell and Montoya are former first round draft picks we’ll probably see more of in the future. If nothing else, more American born goalies are getting work than ever before.


Again, if you ask me, this marks the highest point for American goaltending at both the elite level (three straight Vezina trophies) and from a sheer quantity standpoint. I’m curious to hear counterarguments to this point, though, so feel free to light some logical fireworks in the comments.

Tim Thomas completes an unbelievable year, wins Vezina Trophy

Tim Thomas

Tim Thomas’ dream season in Boston got the cherry on top of the sundae tonight as Thomas took home the Vezina Trophy for the second time in his career. Thomas adds that to the Conn Smythe Trophy he won in helping the Boston Bruins win the Stanley Cup and becomes the first goalie to win all three awards in the same season since Flyers legend Bernie Parent did it in 1975.

Thomas beat out Nashville Predators goalie Pekka Rinne and Stanley Cup finals opponent Roberto Luongo for the award and Rinne gave Thomas a run for his money in the voting. Thomas finished with 104 points in the vote while Rinne was second with 84. Thomas took home 17 of 30 first place votes as NHL general managers handled the vote on this award. Rinne finished with six first place votes and 17 second place votes. Luongo, who had a rough go of things in the finals, finished with three first place votes and 33 points.

For Thomas, the Vezina win was about as close to automatic as it gets as he finished the year tops in the NHL in goals against average and save percentage including setting a new NHL record for save percentage breaking a mark held by Dominik Hasek. About the only thing Thomas could do to top this season would be to win all these awards again and add the Hart Trophy on top of it all. With all that Thomas has overcome to this point in his career, you might not want to put that past him.

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Thomas reflects on winning the Vezina

As we’ve discussed in detail in previous posts, Thomas took a long journey to the NHL. Thomas reflected upon his second career Vezina Trophy victory – and how it compared to the first – shortly after he found out he won the award.

“The first time was pretty special because of how far I’d come and that it looked like was an unattainable award,” Thomas said. “Having said that, this one is just as special; it’s just special in a different way. I think because of all I’ve been through, I could win this six times and it would be special every time.”

Thomas says it is too soon to think about his legacy

Even though he didn’t become a regular NHL starter until he was 31, Thomas has been one of the best goalies in the game for years now. His two Vezina Trophy-winning seasons were so outstanding that it’s tough not to wonder if he might have a case for a quality-over-quantity Hall of Fame argument.

“I hear the discussion around me but I don’t spend anytime focusing on that myself,” Thomas said. “I don’t think that’s productive as a player. That’s something you do when your career is over.”

Tim Thomas: the redneck of goaltending?

Shortly after he allowed a painful Alex Burrows overtime game-winning goal in Game 2 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals, people were wondering if Thomas should tone down his aggressive style. Yet with this flood of individual awards – not to mention that Stanley Cup victory – it seems like his critics are eating some crow.

Then again, eating crow might not be that out of place for “the redneck of goaltending.”

“I think every goalie has to find their own style,” Thomas said. “I don’t think that my style is the perfect style, that’s for sure. But it works for me. And you gotta take the tools that you have and make it work.

I’m kind of like the redneck of goaltending that duct tapes everything together to fix it. You give a redneck a job, they’re going to use whatever tools they have on hand and they’re going to get the job done. That’s the way I approach goaltending.”

It doesn’t take a redneck (or an expert) to know that his approach is working.

PHT makes the case for the Vezina Trophy finalists

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

A straightforward question: Who was the best goaltender this season? Both of the Stanley Cup Final goaltenders were able to prove their ability in the postseason as both Tim Thomas and Roberto Luongo are up for the award. The darkhorse, Pekka Rinne, had a spectacular regular season for the Nashville Predators and helped them get to the second round for the first time in franchise history. But this is a regular season award—so again, who was the best goaltender this season? PHT breaks down the case for each finalist.

Joe Yerdon’s case for Roberto Luongo:

Well this is awkward. Roberto Luongo’s brilliant regular season is clearly going to be overshadowed by his ultimate failure in the Stanley Cup finals. Luckily for him, the Vezina has everything to do with the regular season and nothing to do with the ups and downs of the playoffs.

Luongo was tops in wins, second in goals against average, and third in save percentage in the NHL. If you can ignore that Luongo was behind one or both of the other finalists in this category and put way more value into wins than anything else, he’s just the guy you’re looking for to win the hardware. Luongo’s regular season was great and the Canucks wouldn’t have won the President’s Trophy without his efforts and his outstanding play in goal. The fact that he and Cory Schneider won the Jennings Trophy for fewest goals allowed speaks volumes for how they did and giving up the fewest goals is the important part of a goalie’s job, right? Yeah… That’s about all I’ve got on this one, we know how the voters will go on this one.

James O’Brien’s case for Pekka Rinne:

No doubt about it, I’ve fawned over Thomas to an almost embarrassing degree (especially in the last month). While I’ve said that Thomas put together a historical combined playoffs and regular season run, his lesser known colleague in Nashville was insanely close behind him during the regular season.

Rinne earned an outstanding .930 save percentage, just a few strides behind Thomas’ record-breaking .938 and generally fell just a slight bit behind the two other candidates in some of the sexiest goalie categories.

Yet Thomas and Luongo had the luxury of having more trusted backups to give them a breather. Rinne’s greater workload forced him to make 1,771 saves to 1,699 for Thomas and 1,627 for Luongo. He played in 64 games to 57 for Thomas and 60 for Bobby Lou. If trophy voters consider how crucial a goalie was to his team – rather than which goalie put up the most amazing numbers – then Rinne will have a legitimate shot at winning.

If nothing else, he probably deserves to at least put up a fight in the voting, even if Thomas is the obvious frontrunner.

Matt Reitz’s case for Tim Thomas:

What more can we say about Tim Thomas? The Conn Smyth winner just had one of the best postseasons by a goaltender in the history of hockey. But this is only a regular season award—so the postseason has no bearing on the proceedings. That’s a good thing for Roberto Luongo.

Over the last stretch of the regular season, he actually had a bit of a “slump” by his lofty standards. For Thomas it’s a slump simply because the rest of the season was filled with “oh my goodness those are Hasek-type numbers” good. He led the league with an even 2.00 goals against average and an even more impressive .938 save percentage. As amazing as the statistics were this season, he passed the eyeball test as the most spectacular goaltender this season. But hey, throw in his 35-11-9 record and he pretty much did it all.

People can make cases for other goaltenders, but at some point it’s arguing the obvious. Throw around certain particular stats and maybe one of the other finalists can measure up in a single category. But when it comes right down to it, there’s just no way anyone can deny that he was the best goaltender in the league this year.