Tag: verification line

Gary Bettman

Board of Governors meeting: Conditionally approve goal modifications, talk realignment


The NHL’s Board of Governors gathered to discuss a handful of things that could help the game out in the long run and to help the league get straightened out with their conference alignment.

The league got down to matters on some of the things tested out during the NHL’s R&D camp this summer that saw tactics implemented to help officials both on the ice and in the replay booth make sure that a goal is actually a goal. The green verification line that sits a puck-width behind the red goal line in the net as well as thin mesh on top of the goals and a clear plastic skirt around the bottom of the net have been conditionally approved by the Board of Governors. The board will wait for approval from the NHLPA before going fully ahead with putting these new changes in place for this season.

As for changing the depth of the nets themselves, like the shallower nets used last night in Toronto, that will take approval from the competition committee to make that happen and should that be approved, it won’t happen until next season.

The bigger thing on the Board’s plate today, however, was discussion of realignment starting next season. The talk of realignment came up during the summer and much of that is in part thanks to the Thrashers moving to Winnipeg and adding another team to the west while three eastern located teams continue to play in the Western Conference. Detroit, Columbus, and Nashville are all seeking to find a way to the Eastern Conference next season and Wild owner Craig Leipold even may have tipped off what the NHL’s plans are to do it.

With the Board talking things over today, the clock is officially ticking until when we’ll see what the league comes up with as their solution to trying to keep everyone happy. Dan Rosen of NHL.com has the discussion.

It’s possible that the Board of Governors will discuss changing the structure of the conferences by creating four divisions of seven or eight teams. Columbus, Nashville and Detroit have reportedly expressed an interest in moving to the Eastern Conference.

Going back to a four division alignment would be another “turn back the clock” element by the NHL as that’s the setup the league had before switching to six divisions. The four division format also had the excitement of divisional playoffs with the top four teams in each division making the postseason and then squaring off against each other in the first two rounds of the playoffs. In those days, the schedule was also balanced and not overloaded with games against teams in the division. Rivalries were built in the post season between teams that already hated each other. It was truly a beautiful thing.

Should all these things make a comeback, the NHL doing things “old school” like this would help spice things up in the postseason as well as not burn fans out having so many regular season games between divisional foes. Of course, the NHL could decide to keep doing the playoffs just as they are now with division winners taking the top two spots and everyone else duking it out for the other six spots.

The NHL has to make a move on realignment before December so as to get the schedule in order for next season. If nothing can be agreed upon by then, any plans to realign would likely get tabled for another season. Don’t expect there to be any problems in getting something worked out however.

NHL’s first big change from Camp Shanny could be to the nets

Brendan Shanahan

While the  2011 NHL Research Development and Orientation Camp continues on today in Etobicoke, Ontario there are a couple of changes that are catching the eyes of those in charge right off the bat.

While the league looks to find ways to improve offensive chances and keep the flow of the game rolling along to keep the excitement up, a couple of the methods to switching things up that were tested are earning high marks and could be implemented soon.

While the league is trying out all sorts of potential alterations, the two that are getting very high marks have to do with the net and the goal line. As Chris Johnston reports, making the nets more shallow and adding a second verification line to help with replays are two ideas that are earning high marks.

If you’re wondering how long it could take to implement alterations like this, change could happen a lot sooner than you think as Johnston notes with a quote from the guru of the RDO camp, Brendan Shanahan.

Since the changes being discussed won’t impact the rulebook, the procedure for implementing them is still being ironed out. They’ll likely be used during training camps and exhibition games before the hockey operations department makes a decision on whether they’ll be used during the regular season.

“We’re talking about the process and the steps that would go forward for that,” said Shanahan.

Adding shallower nets seems like a no-brainer kind of move. Giving the players more room behind the net to work and play the puck is a great move that doesn’t have anything to do with moving the nets themselves. In the past we’ve seen how far back the nets go altered to give players more or less room there. Reducing the depth of the net makes far too much sense. To help make replays easier, they’ll make the top part of the net clear plastic so cameras can see straight through.

Adding the verification line along with the clear net tops makes too much sense as well. Having the second line just three inches behind the main goal line means that the puck won’t touch the second line unless it’s fully across the red goal line. By doing that, it eliminates the debate that can erupt on goal replays. While replay can still be foiled on occasion by on-ice official hardheadedness, being able to clear up any and all issues when it comes to debates on goals is a change that makes so much sense it hurts.

While the NHL looked into other things like calling icing on the penalty kill as well as introducing “bear hugging” to try and prevent terrible hits from behind, increasing the flow of the game and keeping the entertainment level high are important things for hockey. After the “dead puck” era of the mid-to-late 90s and early 2000s, introducing anything that means more whistles and slowing down the pace of the game should be an immediate non-starter.

These potential net and goal alterations, however, should get a stronger look during preseason games to see how they play out during a live game. Preseason games don’t count for anything other than getting the guys in shape for the season, and if those new tweaks can work out without issue, there’s no need to hold back from going fully ahead with simple switches that can help get the NHL where they want it to be.