Tag: Vancouver riot

Stanley Cup riot

New contender for “dumbest Stanley Cup rioter” emerges


This morning, the Vancouver Police Department recommended 52 more charges stemming from the June 15 Stanley Cup riot. That brings the total number of charges recommended to 215 — against 80 individuals — with 69 of them having already been approved by Crown Council.

Yet one charge in particular stands out from the rest.

An unidentified 24-year-old male from Blaine, Wash. is facing charges of participating in a riot, mischief and break and enter after police say he looted a number of items from a store.

The kicker? This future MENSA member was wearing a hockey jersey…with his name on it.

“Like many others, the accused broke into the store and stole a number of items,” said the VPD. “Unlike many others that night, [he] allegedly had his surname emblazoned across his back on a hockey jersey.”

Look, you have to be a special kind of stupid to earn “Dumbest Stanley Cup Rioter” honors. There’s some pretty stiff competition, including standing on a Port-a-Potty guy and punched a firefighter guy. But if these charges stick, IDing himself by wearing his own hockey jersey guy is going to top ’em all.

Blackhawks give Canucks a sad dose of reality

Niklas Hjalmarsson Daniel Sedin Dave Bolland Marcus Kruger

Scapegoats provide cruel comfort in an insecure world. Rather than discussing the problems that truly plague our existences, why not pass the buck to some poor sap instead? Vancouver Canucks fans clutch to Roberto Luongo as a big, expensive and easy target when the team falls – particularly when that takes place against the Chicago Blackhawks – but what happens during a meltdown with Bobby Lou on the sidelines thanks to an upper-body injury?

Canucks fans experienced a harsh taste of such a reality on Wednesday night, as the Blackhawks squashed Cory Schneider & Co. by a count of 5-1.

If Luongo being planted on the bench wasn’t enough to shoot a hole in that scapegoating tendency, the completeness of the loss should be. Five different Blackhawks scored goals in that game and the Canucks actually opened up a 1-0 lead early in the second period.

With that, Chicago moves to 27 points (topping all NHL teams) while Vancouver is a decidedly mediocre 9-9-1 for 19 points. Ignoring tiebreakers that place three other teams ahead of them (assuming Los Angeles doesn’t earn a point against Anaheim), the Blackhawks would host the Canucks in a first versus eight seed match if the playoffs began today.

To recap: Luongo isn’t easy to blame, the Blackhawks are running away with the West and the Canucks might be in a dogfight just to make the playoffs. In other words, for Vancouver fans, the hockey world is flipping upside down like a car during a riot.

Check out highlights from the game below.

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Vancouver angst could sully Milan Lucic’s day with the Stanley Cup

Boston Bruins Victory Parade

In the grand scheme of things, it’s important not to throw the entire city of Vancouver under the bus for the riots and all the bad moments that came from the Canucks’ Game 7 loss in the 2011 Stanley Cup finals. The northwest haven’s better side showed itself in a heartwarming way when its kindest residents volunteered to help clean up the mess left behind by the ugly riots.

That being said, those riots and much of the ugliness that lingers will probably make it tough for unbiased fans to root for the team – in fact, those awful antics make Maxim Lapierre’s shenanigans seem quaint. Puck Daddy points to a saddening story in the Vancouver Courier that reveals Vancouver native Milan Lucic’s decision to make his day with the Stanley Cup a low-key affair to avoid bitter Canucks fans.

Megan Stewart reports that posters of the Boston Bruins winger were defaced around town, with his eyes “poked out” and his face “scribbled on.” Stewart also reports that his presence might have lead to some fistfights during a Greek festival last month.

Again, it’s not fair to cast blame on every Vancouver fan/resident because of some knuckleheads, but these stories show how “passion” can mutate into thuggery. For that reason, the Lucic celebration will be subdued (or at least private).

When he celebrates with the Stanley Cup this weekend, Lucic will keep the festivities relatively private and low-key. He won’t be gloating, at least where the public eye can see. Potential to bring hockey’s holy grail to Kitsilano Beach Park for the weekend’s popular sports festival, Kits Fest, were scuttled, according to an event organizer.

All because of a few sore losers. Seeing Lucic with the Stanley Cup would be bittersweet for Canucks Nation, just as it must be acutely bittersweet for him to keep in check the pride he rightfully feels. Such a woe-begotten attitude is beatable by recognizing Lucic for the accomplishments he realized right here at home. However, too many are still hurting over the hometown champion who helped conquer the hometown. Said Snezana, “That’s why Milan does not want to be out there, parading the Cup around his hometown.”

Great job guys, you upset Lucic’s mother.

Vancouver riot kissing couple identified

Riot Breaks Out After Game In Vancouver
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It’s perhaps the lasting image from the inexplicable and foolish rioting in Vancouver that erupted after the Canucks Game 7 loss to Boston in the Stanley Cup finals. A young couple laid out in the street between rioters and riot police caught up in the moment somewhere between feeling amorous and defying a police order. I know that always sets the mood for me.

The one mystery that still lingered on was just who were these lovebirds that find the smell of tear gas to be romantic? That mystery is now at an end as CBC did some digging to figure out just who was who that was mixing it up in the madness and making us think of a certain Beatles song.

As it turns out the couple makes for quite the fun story on their own. From CBC News:

The mystery identity of the couple kissing while lying on a Vancouver street as riot police battled crowds following the Canucks’ Stanley Cup loss has been revealed as Australian Scott Jones and his Canadian girlfriend Alex Thomas.

Jones’s family said he has been in Canada for six months, working as a bartender and trying to break into acting and standup comedy. At least one of his comedy routines has been posted on YouTube.

That’s quite the perfect spot for a guy who’s hoping to become famous to be caught in. As it turns out, Scott’s father Brett was able to confirm it was his son Scott all the way from Perth, Australia as the photo became a viral hit almost immediately.

Brett Jones said the couple had been at the NHL final game, and after the frenzy following the loss spilled into the street, the two were caught in the violence.

“They were between the riot police and the rioters, and the riot police were actually charging forward, and Alex got knocked by a [police] shield and fell to the ground,” he told CBC News. “[Scott] was comforting her and gave her a kiss to say, ‘It’s going to be OK,’ and the photographer just took the shot at that moment.”

Brett Jones said Scott is fine, and Alex suffered a bruised leg from falling to the ground.

With Jones and Thomas now being identified, we’ve got a funny feeling their newly found fame is going to ensure that they’re seen a lot more on TV and the Internet for quite some time. The photo is incredible and the moment of “serenity amongst madness” gives you the kind of emotion that is so rarely seen in any sort of photography. While the situation was terrible and the reasons for it happening are nonsensical, it’s amazing to see something so seemingly beautiful to come out of it. Here’s to hoping their fame doesn’t go to their heads.

Vancouver riot reactions: Thousands volunteer to clean up mess, Henrik Sedin voices disgust

APTOPIX Stanley Cup Vancouver Scene Hockey

While it still remains unclear how much precise damage and the exact number of people who were injured in some way during last night’s riots in Vancouver, the latest numbers indicate that 130 to 140 people were admitted to local hospitals. Many of those injuries were reportedly related to the tear gas and pepper spray used at the scenes, although three people were treated for stab wounds with one person in critical condition. There haven’t been any fatalities reported at this time, though.

Whatever the final, official numbers end up being, it’s a huge black eye for the city of Vancouver (even if the spin dictates that it was a relatively small piece of the populace). The city also rioted in 1994 following the team’s Game 7 loss to the New York Rangers, leaving about 200 people injured in that incident.

While this event probably cost the city millions in damage – not to mention terrible public relations that might impact their tourism? – there have been some moments that remind us that there are good people in that well-liked city. Lesley Ciarula Taylor of the Star reports that 11,300 people volunteered to help clean up the mess that looters made in the city, although it isn’t known if that many people actually followed up on the encouraging drive.

(The Facebook group is located here while the Twitter group is @VancouverClean.)

Taylor’s story provided some reactions by local athletes and celebrities.

“World: as you can imagine Vancouver is being embarrassed by a relative few,” wrote basketball star Steve Nash of Victoria, B.C., according to The Canadian Press.

“We’re a great city and have a lot of class. Our team is great and our championship will come. Soon.”

Also on Twitter, B.C. Premier Christy Clark begged rioters: “Let’s not make things worse,” she said. “Time to go home.”

Former B.C. premier and past Liberal MP Ujjal Dosanjh tweeted: “Shame! “Not the Vancouver I know.”

Musician Johnny Reid urged the vandals to “stop the madness.”

“Trying to figure out why a few idiots can leave an entire country with a black eye?”

Henrik Sedin also expressed his disappointment about the situation.

“It’s terrible,” Canucks captain Henrik Sedin said, shaking his head. “This city and province has a lot to be proud of, the team we have and the guys we have in here. It’s too bad.”

This ugly incident makes it tough to argue that the city has progressed much since 1994. If the team makes it to a big stage like this – a likely scenario since elite players, for the most part, remain in place – let’s hope that officials are more prepared and fans are less unruly. If that takes limiting alcohol sales and gatherings around big screens altogether, then so be it.