Tag: trash talking

Paul Bissonnette, Jerred Smithson

Brian McGrattan says BizNasty “wouldn’t even look at him” to fight


Brian McGrattan certainly knows how to get noticed upon making his return to the NHL. The AHL single-season penalty minute record holder and newly acquired Nashville Predator got to suit up against the Coyotes in the Preds 5-2 loss to Phoenix, but it didn’t go quite the way McGrattan was hoping for.

With McGrattan being a fighter and the Coyotes having Internet superstar Paul “BizNasty” Bissonnette roaming on the ice there ready to drop the gloves, McGrattan was hoping to get famous on BizNasty. Bissonnette wasn’t having it though. Buddy Oakes of Preds On The Glass hears from McGrattan about how BizNasty wouldn’t have a go.

McGrattan is known as one of the toughest enforcers in hockey. During the game he tried to use his physical game to no avail. “I tried a couple of times but if you don’t have a taker then you can’t take yourself out of the game trying to do that the whole game. You ask once or twice and if nothing’s there you try to do other things.”

The guy that wouldn’t participate was Coyote tough-guy, Paul Bisssonette. McGrattan said, “He didn’t even look at me.”

Things in the AHL might be a bit more brutal with fights and shenanigans, but in the NHL when your team is up, and up comfortably, the chances are that an enforcer taking a fight while his team is up big will get him benched. Bissonnette did right by his team not taking a fight and potentially getting the Preds fired up and back in the game.

McGrattan may have been out of the NHL for a bit, but even he’s got to know that no one will dance with him when things are out of hand.

Trash talk: How far is too far?

New York Rangers v Philadelphia Flyers

By now, most people are familiar with Wayne Simmonds’ “alleged” slur directed at Sean Avery. Simmonds has denied using the word and the league refused to punish the Flyers forward because there none of the on-ice officials actually witnessed it. Part of the reason that the story has gained so much traction is because Simmonds was actually captured on video using the alleged term. Part of it is because Simmonds himself had just been a victim of a racist act only days before in London, Ontario. Regardless, the emotional climate around the game was already at a fever-pitch when Simmonds and Avery had their war of words.

One NHL coach thinks that things have gone too far. Boston Bruins head coach Claude Julien said things have gotten out of control with the trash talk that occurs on the ice. In fact, Julien thinks that it’s time to start punishing players for trash talk that crosses the line:

“There’s a rule in place for certain type of language — whether it’s to referees and stuff like that, you certainly can get tossed out of a game. I’m one of those guys that believe that you know you shouldn’t be crossing the lines. There’s some things that are being said out there that are really crossing the line. Whether that’s been like that decades ago, I’m not quite sure. People are going after divorces or calling people certain names that I don’t even want to allude to here, but there is a fine line I think that has to exist.”

Let’s be clear: this isn’t first time anyone has used this particular type of language on the ice. In fact, it’s probably not the first time that exact word was use in Avery’s direction. It doesn’t make it right—but let’s not pretend like this is the first time anything like this has happened. If HBO had all 40 guys mic’d up every single game, we’d certainly hear language that would make Bruce Boudreau blush. One of the main reasons this is a huge story is because it was caught on tape.

The difference today is just how far the slurs and taunts go these days. Julien had more to say:

“There’s gamesmanship and then there’s crossing the line, and, you know, I think more and more, players today are going further than they used to.”

“You’d hoped that it would be policed by themselves, by having a little bit more respect for each other. They are part of a player’s association and they should all be part of a group. There should be at least that kind of respect that exists.”

Policing language on the ice is a slippery slope that the NHL should want no part of policing. Something that is deemed offensive to a guy like Rocco Grimaldi may be just a normal part of speech for other players around the NHL. Then again, something that Sean Avery or Wayne Simmonds may say in the heat of battle may be acceptable to them—but not acceptable to a player who is in the middle of a slump and struggling to make a team. Will the NHL be responsible to hand down a fine or suspension each and every time a player is offended by an opponent?

It’s a tough situation because many people (including this writer), do not condone a player using the Simmonds particular slur. Just like there are slurs that are highly offensive to African American athletes, Simmonds alleged insult are those that will strike a nerve with GLAAD. Just about every demographic has a few words that cross the line.

These are the easy cases—there’s no place in the game for that kind of language. Most would say there’s no place in society.

Here’s the question: who draws the line what is accepted and what is not? There’s a rather large gray area here because different people have different standards. Obviously, this is a touchy subject so we want to throw it out to the readers. What do you think? Do you think trash talking should be limited or should players continue to have free reign over what is said on the ice. Do you have any ideas of how the league could logically police trash talking?

Sean Avery accuses Wayne Simmonds of making homophobic remarks during preseason game

New York Rangers v Philadelphia Flyers

People who follow the New York Rangers-Philadelphia Flyers’ rivalry should be accustomed to games getting very contentious. That being said, tonight’s preseason match featured more than just bad blood.

There were two incidents that will leave many shaking their heads, but the headline-grabber involved Flyers winger Wayne Simmonds. Simmonds is being accused of making some off-color remarks to Sean Avery less than a week after he dealt with a disgusting display of racism from at least one fan in London, Ontario. Simmonds didn’t really deny making the comments, although he didn’t confirm them either.

Puck Daddy’s Ryan Lambert pointed to a video that indicates that Simmonds made a homophobic comment to Avery. Various sources report that Avery confirmed those rumors, while Simmonds vaguely said that “language was exchanged.” Simmonds said he didn’t recall the specific words he said, a response that left many rolling their eyes.

Here are some quotes from both sides. (For a full video of Simmonds’ comments, click here.)

“To be here now having to answer the questions about what he did is disappointing for me. I’m disappointed for him,” Avery said.


“Honestly, we were going back and forth for a while there,” Simmonds said. “I don’t recall everything that I did say to him but he said to me some things I didn’t like and maybe I said some things that he didn’t like. I can’t recall every single word I said.”

The incident gains relevance because it was Simmonds and Avery

It’s naive to assume that these types of comments are uncommon in sports, as sad as that might be. This case is more noteworthy because of the two parties involved, though. Some might lose some respect for Simmonds after tonight, especially after what happened last week. (That seems unfair since Simmonds didn’t make a big deal about the awful banana-throwing incident, but that won’t change the way some feel about this situation.)

Avery is also a notable recipient of that comment for two reasons.

1. Avery has been outspoken regarding the topic of gay rights, although it’s hard to imagine that Simmonds allegedly made those remarks for that reason.

2. On the flip side of the coin, Avery has been accused of troublesome comments of his own in the past. Georges Laraque claimed that Avery called him a “monkey,” although the Rangers pest denied that accusation.

Again, these kinds of comments might be commonplace in trash-talking, but that doesn’t make the situation acceptable. The bottom line is that both scenarios are extremely disappointing.

There’s some talk regarding whether or not NHL disciplinarian Brendan Shanahan should take action. Some fans might insist that the league shouldn’t intervene in trash-talking situations, but Avery’s six-game suspension in 2008 is just one example of the NHL sidelining a player for a remark or gesture rather than an ugly hit. It’s tough to speculate about what might happen here – if anything at all – but there is some precedent to players being suspended for words or gestures rather than actions.

A more straightforward issue

Speaking of handing out suspensions, the Rangers-Flyers game might provide Shanahan with something a little less nebulous to deal with. As you can see from this video, Tom Sestito caught Andre Deveaux with a check from behind. In a twist that might seem fitting to some and stomach-churning to others, Sestito essentially replaced Jody Shelley, a depth player who received a hefty suspension for a check from behind. Sestito seemed worried about a possible similar punishment, while Rangers head coach John Tortorella said that the hit was even worse than the one Shelley delivered.

Jagr shines in an ugly game

The game was flat-out ugly through the first two periods, with the Rangers tallying 38 PIM and the Flyers ending up with 39. That’s not to say that there weren’t moments of beauty, though, as Jaromir Jagr made his home preseason debut a tantalizing one by scoring two goals and one assist in a 5-3 win.

Chances are, that nice output will be forgotten long before the Simmonds-Avery incident, though.