Tag: trade rumors

Los Angeles Kings v Vancouver Canucks - Game One

The Flyers are interested in Roberto Luongo


If you thought the Roberto Luongo-to-Toronto rumors were getting hot, you might want to buckle up.

TVA’s Enrico Ciccone tweeted earlier today that the Philadelphia Flyers were interested in picking up Luongo and that rumor was confirmed by TSN’s James Duthie this evening.

What to make of all this? Not much right now other than another team apparently getting in the hunt for the likely soon-to-be Canucks star goalie. Before the lockout, rumors swirled about the Florida Panthers and Chicago Blackhawks being involved in the hunt for Luongo, but those teams didn’t have a goalie signed to a long-term, big money deal the way the Flyers do.

Oh yeah, Ilya Bryzgalov is still the Flyers’ goalie and he has eight years left on his contract with the team at $5.6 million per year. With each team having two compliance buyouts coming after this season is over, it’s possible some team could/would buy out Bryz.

Then again, as Duthie says, the rumor doesn’t mean the Flyers will acquire Luongo, it just means they’ve asked about him. Can we get the CBA fully ratified so silly season can begin in earnest?

Update: Philly.com’s Frank Seravalli spoke with Flyers GM Paul Holmgren and his take on the rumor is pretty fantastic. “That made me chuckle. Safe to say they aren’t true. They have no basis or merit.”

Another update: Adrian Dater of the Denver Post says to not believe the Flyers’ disinterest and adds that the Canucks would ask for Niklas Grossmann in a deal for Luongo. Failing that they’d ask for Schenn. We’ll assume he means Luke Schenn. Gee, this couldn’t just be an effort by the Canucks to drive up the price for a guy they almost have to trade, could it?


Meanwhile, Ilya Bryzgalov wants to play a lot this year

Rick Nash update: “NHL-ready forwards” are big part of asking price

Columbus Blue Jackets v Pittsburgh Penguins

With the CBA talks taking a turn for the scary and Shane Doan’s decision put off for even longer, it seems like a decent time to take a glance at the drawn-out divorce between Rick Nash and the Columbus Blue Jackets.

The latest update in the hockey game show “What does GM Scott Howson want for Nash now?” comes from TSN. While it’s likely that a couple NHL-ready forwards won’t be enough to do the job alone, that’s currently Howson’s emphasis in talks.

“If we do complete a trade, we’re trading out a 30-to-40 goal scorer,” Howson said. “Defense is probably the strongest part of our team if we look at it today, so we’re looking to get some NHL forwards back first and foremost.”

Personally, I think Howson is only half-correct about the Blue Jackets’ strength. While they’ve invested an unusually large amount of money in their defense – compared to the value they’re expected to get – stopping other teams from scoring isn’t necessarily their strongest point. Instead, their blueliners are probably most adept at filling the net. Both Jack Johnson and James Wisniewski are known more for creating offense (sometimes for both sides) than stifling it.

Interestingly enough, Howson shot down rumors about the team’s interest in highly touted Los Angeles Kings backup Jonathan Bernier. He mentioned that there might have been some interest at the draft before they acquired Sergei Bobrovsky, but it stopped there.

Either way, many must wonder if the Blue Jackets will relent from what’s widely believed to be an excessive asking price for Nash. Howson isn’t budging on his quest to squeeze every asset he can imagine from the team’s soon-to-be-ex captain, though.

“I have a value that I’ve placed on Rick and that our whole organization has placed on Rick,” Howson said. “He’s an elite player, he’s been a tremendous ambassador for our franchise and our city and we’re very comfortable with the value we’ve placed on him and until we get that value, we’re going to keep working away at it.”

More than a few GMs probably feel like saying “good luck with that,” then.

Report: Blues show some interest in Jason Garrison

Florida Panthers v Ottawa Senators

Earlier today, we passed along notes about St. Louis Blues GM Doug Armstrong’s hopes of adding a top-four defenseman. Jeremy Rutherford reports that they have at least some interest in a guy who would fit that description: pending Florida Panthers free agent Jason Garrison.

Armstrong noted that it would be more likely that the Blues will trade for a free agent blueliner rather than signing one, but that doesn’t mean Garrison wouldn’t fit. After all, they could always acquire his rights before July 1 – which might be just fine with Florida if they decide that his contract demands are excessive.

We can debate Garrison’s merits in his own zone all day, but it’s hard not to gravitate toward his booming slap shot. He might be a mph or five below Zdeno Chara in that category, yet for a Blues team that struggled on the power play, Garrison’s shot could be quite the tonic.

Of course, it’ll all come down to the price being right – both in trade and contract terms. Still, it’s interesting to ponder. How well do you think he’d fit in St. Louis?

Boston reporter thinks Tim Thomas will get traded this summer


In the Boston Bruins elimination post, I noted the team’s goaltending conundrum coming into the summer: Tuukka Rask is a restricted free agent while Tim Thomas is scheduled to enter the last year of his contract. ESPN Boston’s Jimmy Murphy has a bold prediction about how the Bruins will react to that scenario.

“My prediction now: Tim Thomas traded in off-season,” – Murphy’s Tweet.

When reading such a Tweet, I think of two things a) my advice to the Bruins to avoid trading Thomas before the 2010-11 season and b) the surprisingly similar scenario between Roberto Luongo and Cory Schneider in Vancouver.

The former point shows that the question has been floating around pretty much since Rask started to really make Toronto Maple Leafs fans grimace about him being traded. The latter holds some weight for a few reasons.

Rask = Schneider?

For one, both Schneider and Rask need new deals, which means that both the Bruins and Canucks probably know that they can’t afford to keep their “goalies of the future” under their expensive franchise guys much longer. It’s interesting to note the parallels between the two scenarios as Rask and Schneider allowed their respective clubs to rest expensive starters before the 2011 playoffs, yet now both teams are out after the first round.

Potential diminishing returns

While Canucks fans have essentially turned on Luongo (and his long contract), trading Thomas would have a lot to do with his age (he just turned 38 on April 15) and the fact that his contract is almost up. One might lazily equate Thomas’ potential departure to Peyton Manning giving way to Andrew Luck; if the Bruins decide to go with youth over a bigger resume, then Rask would win out.

Of course, Thomas hasn’t undergone scary neck surgeries and was still quite good this season, so making this move might even be bolder than the Indianapolis Colts parting ways with a legend.


So let’s roll out the questions: how likely would it really be to see Boston move a guy who won them the 2011 Stanley Cup? Would they be wise to go younger in net while also getting something for Thomas? Perhaps they should consider swapping him at the trade deadline, instead? Fire away in the comments.

Channeling Costanza: Should Toronto trade Phil Kessel?

Phil Kessel; Mike Komisarek

Two fascinating bits of Canadian commentary converged to formulate a wacky thought. Should Toronto Maple Leafs GM Brian Burke channel the contrary streak that George Costanza once rode by trading Phil Kessel?

Before I delve deeper, here’s the video behind the reference:

Now, the National Post’s Bruce Arthur compared the Maple Leafs to that classic Costanza bit because they won right when it seemed best to lose. (Toronto might be at the point that they should concede its playoff run and tank for a better draft pick.)


… Yet, when you think about it, the comparison actually might extend to Damien Cox’s rabble rousing claim that the Maple Leafs should trade their high-scoring winger Phil Kessel.

To Cox’s credit, he does describe his suggestion as a “terrible choice” that Burke should make. The logic is simple: as good as Kessel is, he’s not the “leader” that the Maple Leafs need – he’s not “a Carlyle player” – so why not “cut bait” now?

Moving Kessel wouldn’t signify “blowing up” the blueprint. It would simply be an acknowledgment this player doesn’t embody what the club requires at this stage. All the other young assets acquired in recent years can be retained and prospects and/or picks secured in a Kessel trade would be valuable pieces.

Burke can’t afford to insist that Kessel is a foundation player when he obviously is not, at least not for these Leafs, and he certainly can’t afford to make another huge financial commitment to him.

Another terrible choice is upon the Leaf hockey boss. He waited too long to make the first one and it cost him. He can’t make that mistake again.

It’s an interesting perspective, but I’m not sure if the Richards/Carter parallel makes sense. The Flyers had Claude Giroux, James van Riemsdyk, Danny Briere and other quality forwards to fill the void; is there any one on Kessel’s level in Toronto? The best immediate answer would probably be Joffrey Lupul, whose renaissance has a lot to do with his chemistry alongside Kessel.


Still, there’s no doubt that if the Buds did want to sell high on Kessel, now would be the best time to do so. With all that in mind, what do you think? Should Toronto stick with him or provide an ode to Costanza’s bizarro strategy and trade him away?