Tag: trade demand

Cory Sarich

This is not a joke: Cory Sarich demands to be traded


Players demanding to be traded just ain’t what it used to be.

Sportsnet’s Roger Millions reports that Calgary’s Cory Sarich has asked the Flames to trade him so he can stop watching games from the press box and start playing in them.

While it’s noble that Sarich wants an opportunity to play games again and free Calgary from his $3.6 million cap hit, it’s going to be awfully hard to find a team that has that kind of salary space for a fifth or sixth defenseman.

While Sarich is a physical blueliner that’s happy to drop the gloves, his skills have fallen to where the struggling Flames aren’t playing him. With Sarich due to be a free agent after this season, he makes out to be a very expensive (and not overly useful) rental player. Good luck to GM Jay Feaster for trying to help grant Sarich’s wish.

Chances are if Sarich is going to be “traded” at all, it’ll be to the Flames AHL affiliate in Abbotsford.

LeBrun: Kyle Turris officially wants to be traded

Kyle Turris
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Apparently Kyle Turris and his agent Kurt Overhardt were getting tired of hearing the speculation and rumors about what’s going on with their lack of negotiations with the Coyotes. ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun hears from Overhardt that his client does indeed want to be traded out of Phoenix.

While that revelation may not be that big of a surprise given the contention between both sides in their talks, the most curious part of what Overhardt shared with LeBrun was that their talks were never about money.  Instead, Overhardt says it’s been about allowing Turris to be able to move forward in his career in Phoenix.

In his time in Phoenix over parts of three seasons, Turris has averaged just over 12 minutes per game in ice time. It’s tough to move your career ahead when you don’t play. You also have to earn the ice time as well and that’s a struggle he’s had under Dave Tippett in Phoenix.

Coyotes GM Don Maloney has been adamant that he will not trade Turris and that if he doesn’t like it, he can sit and pout about it, mostly because he has no choice in the matter. Turris is a restricted free agent and under Coyotes control no matter what. Unless a team tried to sign Turris to an offer sheet, the Coyotes don’t have to make a move at all. Turris, meanwhile, has until December 1 to get signed or else he sits out for the year.

What was an ugly situation already just got escalated into a game of chicken. The catch here being that Turris and Overhardt are playing it against a tree and not another car. Unless Maloney is thoroughly blown away by a trade offer, it’s hard to see him budging on this situation.

So Kyle Turris wants out of Phoenix after all

Kyle Turris

How good are Kyle Turris’ contract negotiations going in Phoenix? They’re going so well that according to CBC’s Elliotte Friedman Turris now wants out of town (see item 9).

After seeing crazy demands out of Turris’ camp as the restricted free agent looks to play this year, his frustration at not getting a deal squared away with Coyotes GM Don Maloney, Turris would like to take his talents elsewhere away from coach Dave Tippett. The problems here for Turris is that he’s under Coyotes control no matter what, doesn’t have the scoring numbers to back up his demands, and has a December 1 deadline to sign a contract or sit out the whole season.

Time is ticking away in that respect and the Coyotes don’t need to do anything for him because he’s their player and unless a massive offer sheet comes Turris’ way, the Coyotes would likely match any deal. Talk about having no leverage. Turris’ agent Kurt Overhardt has been quiet about his client is actually looking for from the Coyotes.

As for who might want Turris, line up any team in need of a young, talented center. Calgary (desperate for help outside of Jokinen), Anaheim (Saku Koivu is on the old side), Toronto (Grabovski the lone guy to be counted on), and Edmonton (if they’re done with Sam Gagner) stand out above all. With Turris’ RFA status and the Coyotes not looking to deal him, however, he could be out of luck and get to sit home all season long. Here’s to hoping Turris bought a nice recliner to sit at home with, he’ll need it.

Mike Commodore’s days in Columbus numbered? Defenseman reportedly asks for trade


Blue Jackets defenseman Mike Commodore has been having a roller coaster season.

In just the 20 games he’s played this year he’s got two goals and four assists and has a -8 plus/minus rating. They’re not thrilling numbers, but for a defensive shutdown guy like Commodore they’re somewhat expected, aside from the curious minus rating. Lately, he’s been a healthy scratch in seven of the last eight games Columbus has played. If you’re thinking a veteran defenseman like him is going to to take that sort of inaction happily, you’d be fooling yourself.

Today, Aaron Portzline of The Columbus Dispatch reports that Commodore is unhappy enough with his situation in Columbus that he’s demanded a trade. As you might expect, Commodore isn’t too pleased with how things are going.

“(Arniel) doesn’t want to play me. Obviously, he doesn’t want to play me. After wins, losses … it doesn’t matter. Obviously, I’m the seventh guy in his mind. So, I’m going to take care of myself, be a good teammate, work hard, practice hard and keep myself ready for whatever comes in the future.”

Jackets coach Scott Arniel has a different view on things and says that he doesn’t care about how much money a guy makes and that for now Commodore is the team’s seventh defenseman. On some teams that could be a factor of having great depth. In Columbus, it’s not quite like that as younger guys like Anton Stralman, Marc Methot, and Kris Russell are getting the playing time over him.

Commodore’s -8 rating, by the way, is tied with Kristian Huselius for second-worst on the team. Derek Dorsett’s -10 is still worse.

The one major hangup in trying to deal Commodore will be his salary. He’s got two years left on his deal after this one and his cap hit is a robust $3.75 million. Asking for another team to take him on with that sort of financial commitment is asking a lot, or it’s asking to take on another team’s high-priced problem elsewhere on the ice.

A change of scenery for Commodore could be the elixir he needs to get his game turned around, and there’s some teams with situations where he’d be helpful to what they have going on but whether or not they’d pull the trigger on a deal is debatable. In the cap world, finances mean almost as much as getting the right fit for your team.