Tag: Tony Esposito

2012 NHL Entry Draft - Round One

Bruins sign first-rounder Malcolm Subban


The Boston Bruins signed first-round draft pick Malcolm Subban to an entry-level contract today.

That takes him one step closer to a made-for-TV matchup with his brother P.K. Subban, whose Montreal Canadiens face the Bruins six times per season. (At least according to current scheduling.)

Malcolm Subban probably still has a long way to go to be the Tony to P.K.’s Phil Esposito, though.

Goalies tend to take some time to develop, and even with Tim Thomas almost certainly out of the picture, it could be a while before he receives extended NHL reps.

(On the other hand, P.K. made a quick jump – especially for a defenseman – so you never know.)

Until then, sportswriters will have to settle for less-interesting sibling vs. goalie duels such as Drew vs. Ryan Miller and Steve vs. Jonathan Bernier.

Halak and Elliott continue to attack Hall of Famers’ records

halak elliott

Earlier this week, we spotlighted how the St. Louis goaltending duo of Brian Elliott and Jaroslav Halak broke a 43-year-old franchise shutout record set by Hall of Famers Glen Hall and Jacques Plante.

Well, Halak and Elliott are at it again.

This time they’ve got former Chicago Blackhawks great Tony Esposito in the cross hairs — by combining for 15 shutouts, they’ve tied the modern-day record for shutouts in a season set by Espo in 1969-70.

More, from NHL.com:

Esposito got 56 goals of support in his 15 shutouts, an average of 3.73 goals per game — and that includes a scoreless tie against Boston on March 11, 1970. By the standards of his era, he wasn’t overworked, facing an average of 28.5 shots in the 15 shutouts. Esposito never faced more than 38 shots or fewer than 21. He faced more than 30 four times.

In contrast, the Blues have provided their goaltenders with just 36 goals in their 15 shutouts, an average of just 2.4 per game (including a 1-0 shootout loss at Los Angeles last week). But they’ve more than made up for any offensive shortcomings with their defensive play. Elliott has faced an average of just 23.1 shots in his nine shutouts, with a high of 37, and saw fewer than 20 in three of the nine. Halak has seen an average of 22 shots in his six shutouts and hasn’t faced more than 30 in any of them.

The shots-faced statistic will likely be the asterisk tagged onto Halak and Elliott’s accomplishments. While it doesn’t completely diminish what they’ve done, it doesn’t bolster anything — Halak’s made just 1060 saves this season (29th in the NHL) while Elliott’s made 860…13 more than Minnesota backup Josh Harding.

The reality is that a light workload, combined with the timeshare situation, has allowed both goalies to stay razor-sharp throughout the year. Which begs the question: Can Hitch keep using Elliott and Halak during the playoffs?

Bernie Miklasz of St. Louis Today thinks he can (and points to historical evidence as proof) but again, there’s more reality to consider. The last legitimate timeshare that won a Stanley Cup was in 1971-72, when Boston used Gerry Cheevers and Eddie Johnston almost equally throughout the postseason.

And that happened 40 years ago.