Tag: Todd Marchant

Corey Perry

Andrew Cogliano hopes for big changes, Corey Perry shoots for more of the same next season

The Anaheim Ducks once ranked as a mystery team going into next season, but things look brighter now that Teemu Selanne’s back and Jonas Hiller claims he’s healthy. Having the fog lifted (for the most part) from their two biggest question marks is a huge step forward for the top-heavy team, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t other variables that could have a massive impact on their fortunes.

While most people in the hockey world begrudgingly agreed that Corey Perry was an elite power forward going into the 2010-11 season, few would have predicted his 50-goal, Hart Trophy-winning campaign. Perry’s red-hot second half propelled him to the forefront of the MVP race and also helped the Ducks make a manic late-season run to the fourth seed in the Western Conference.

It would be natural to ask the “Can he do it again?” question about any player who made the leap from very good player to arguably being the top guy in the sport, but it’s an even more pertinent one because of Perry’s style. The agitating forward makes almost as much of an impact by rubbing opponents the wrong way as he does by creating offense. Last season, he found the right balance between being a nuisance and a goalie’s nightmare. NHL.com’s Brian Hunter took a look at whether or not he could pull that off again next season.

“That’s kind of my style of game, being not so much an agitator but being in people’s faces and in front of the goalie and those different things,” Perry told NHL.com. “You’ve just got to be careful. You can’t take those stupid penalties in the offensive zone, or a tripping or a slashing or whatever. You’ve got to eliminate those and go from there.”


“I wasn’t in the penalty box as much as I was in the first half of the year,” Perry said. “Those different things definitely helped to increase my ice time, kept me in the game a little bit more. You put those things in the back of your mind and I think you use those to your advantage.”

While his PIM total (104) was only slightly lower than previous seasons, Psource: APerry made more of an impact killing penalties than ever before last season. He was the Ducks’ fifth-highest rated forward as far as shorthanded time per game, with an 1:38 average. If he can make the same kind of impact this season as he did in 2010-11, the Ducks might just find themselves in the playoffs once more.


With all the concern over Selanne’s future, one under-the-radar loss that could leave a substantial dent in the Ducks’ already-shaky defense was Todd Marchant’s retirement. Marchant logged a staggering 3:36 shorthanded time per game, far and way the most among Anaheim forwards and second most among all NHL forwards. (If you look at total penalty killing time rather than average, he was number 1 among forwards last season.)

It’s true that training camps can change things, but the thought is that Andrew Cogliano might take his third line center role and many of those penalty killing responsibilities. Considering his struggles in Edmonton and his faceoff deficiencies, that might be a cause for concern. Both Cogliano and the Ducks hope he can turn things around after the team gave up a 2013 second round pick to acquire him and then handed him a three-year, $7.17 million deal.

“I think there’s so much more for him to give and I told him so,” head coach Randy Carlyle said. “With a player of that ability and that speed we’re going to try to push him into a different area and hopefully he responds.”

The Ducks will likely need some great play from their forwards this season, so getting much more out of Cogliano and the same efforts from Perry could go a long way in helping them earn a playoff berth in the brutal West.

Ducks avoid arbitration with Andrew Cogliano; Sign him to three-year, $7.17 million deal

Andrew Cogliano
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When the Anaheim Ducks acquired Andrew Cogliano from Edmonton for a 2013 second round pick, they were hoping to have acquired the third line center that could be the next coming of Todd Marchant. Marchant was a speedy penalty killer and solid guy up the middle that the Ducks thought highly of, but with his retirement they had a need at center. Enter Cogliano and now the Ducks can say they’ve at least got him locked away for the short term future.

Anaheim avoided going to arbitration with Cogliano and signed him to a three-year contract worth $7.17 million in all. Through his four years in Edmonton, Cogliano has been a steady 30-40 point per year player. On the high-scoring Ducks he won’t be relied upon for a lot of offense and getting that sort of production from the third line would be a big lift. Guys like Marchant and Kyle Chipchura in the past weren’t big point producers but they defended well enough. If Cogliano can help shut down opponents and continue to chip in like that offensively, the Ducks will be better off for it.

After all, the Ducks roll with a top line featuring Bobby Ryan, Ryan Getzlaf, and Corey Perry and they can provide enough offense for some teams for a full season. Should Teemu Selanne come back again, the second line will feature him along with elder statesmen Saku Koivu and Jason Blake once again. Getting things figured out depth-wise was a priority for Ducks GM Bob Murray and getting a bit younger by acquiring Cogliano was a good way to do it.

Oilers trade Andrew Cogliano to the Ducks for Anaheim’s 2013 second round pick

Braden Holtby, Andrew Cogliano

Aside from trading spare parts (acquiring Kurtis Foster for Andy Sutton) and losing a valuable defensive forward to retirement, the Anaheim Ducks haven’t been very busy in this off-season. Some probably worry that they haven’t been proactive regarding their precarious goaltending situation considering the questionable health of netminder Jonas Hiller.

It looks like they’ve made an effort to cover the “speedy depth center” gap left behind by Todd Marchant’s retirement, though. The Ducks traded their 2013 second round pick to the Edmonton Oilers for Andrew Cogliano today.

Cogliano shares at least two traits with Marchant: he skates like the wind and he’s a former forward of the Oilers organization. That being said, there are significant differences between the two. With Marchant, there was the feeling that he maxed out just about every ounce of his ability. Marchant was also a reliable defensive forward who lead all forwards in total penalty kill time in 2010-11. Conversely, Cogliano seems like he’s associated with wasted talent or wildly incorrect expectations. (He’s also known in certain segments of the hockey blogosphere for being notoriously weak in the faceoff circle. The impact of such  a deficit is tough to quantify, but it’s a flaw that isn’t very promising for a guy who will probably be expected to kill penalties.)

Maybe a change of scenery – and the possibility of getting the occasional whiff of playing time with one of Anaheim’s elite power forwards – might do Cogliano some good. It’s tough to argue with the sentiment that the Oilers are right to cut bait with the fast but ineffective forward, especially with the solid return that could come from that 2013 second rounder.

The Ducks still need to sign the restricted free agent to a new contract, though. Cogliano is set for salary arbitration on July 21, so the penny-pinching Ducks might want to avoid that process since he might get a decent amount of change being that he hit the 45-point mark once and scored a decent 35 points in 2010-11.

There’s a general sense of negativity about Cogliano from the Edmonton/stat guys side, but are any Ducks fans excited or are any fans of Anaheim’s biggest rivals a little nervous about this swap? Let us know in the comments.

Todd Marchant ends his NHL career after 17 seasons, joins Ducks’ front office

Anaheim Ducks v Dallas Stars

After 17 seasons (or 16 if you discount four games in 1993-94), Todd Marchant decided to hang up his skates today.

When it comes to Marchant, it’s wise to focus on his skates, too. He was one of the fastest skaters in the NHL – especially during his prime – and served as a steady-to-great defensive forward up to his last minutes with the Anaheim Ducks.

The already defense-deficient Ducks will probably miss the aging veteran’s presence on the ice, too; Blair Betts is the only forward in the NHL who averaged more shorthanded time on ice per game than Marchant (3:37 to 3:36) and Marchant’s 285:08 PK minutes were the most of any forward in 2010-11. Only teammate Toni Lydman [290:47] and Ottawa Senators stalwart Chris Phillips [290:26] compiled more minutes on the PK last season, period.

While the Ducks will miss his presence on the ice, Marchant will take a spot in the team’s front office. He’ll hold the title of Director of Player Development, according to NHL.com.

Many will rightly remember Marchant for being a great defensive forward (not to mention his gravy days with the Edmonton Oilers, when he skated like the wind while compiling a career high 60 points in 2002-03), but I cannot shake video game-related memories of the man.

As Battle of California’s Earl Sleek would probably tell you, Marchant might be the prime example of a solid player who could become a force in video games – especially when the titles were less realistic. With goal scoring ability being dictated largely by the person holding the controller, Marchant’s “stone hands” didn’t register anywhere near as much as his blazing speed. Maybe Marchant fell many strides short of a superstar, but in the right video game exploiting hands, he could do far more damage than his real-life counterpart could even imagine.

Hopefully Marchant doesn’t take such memories as in insult, though. He had a great career for a seventh round pick (164th overall in 1993), whether you remember him as someone who made offensive forwards miserable or a guy who played way over his head in the world of sprites and polygons.

Save of the night: Kari Lehtonen’s stunning glove save on the breakaway

Stars goalie Kari Lehtonen did some solid work last night in helping Dallas earn a 2-1 win over the Anaheim Ducks. He got things started in the first period, though, to help give the Ducks fits stopping Todd Marchant on a shorthanded breakaway. Lehtonen’s lunging glove save helped set the tone for the rest of the night that if the Ducks wanted to score, they’d just have to try harder.