Tag: TJ Oshie

USA forward T.J. Oshie reacts after scoring the winning goal against Russia goaltender Sergei Bobrovski in a shootout during overtime of a men's ice hockey game at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip )

What they’re saying about T.J. Oshie


Before the Olympics, the United States’ T.J. Oshie was having the best season of his career with the Blues, but how many people knew the 27-year-old forward’s name outside of St. Louis? With his incredible shootout performance against Russia on Saturday, he’s become the talk of a nation.

VIDEO: Watch OT and the shootout again

We’ve filtered through all that to bring you a collection of what was being said in the aftermath of Oshie’s showing. It seems appropriate to start with how this changes things for him:

Suddenly Oshie became the talk of celebrities and even earned recognition from President Barack Obama:

Not to mention the praise of his peers and former NHL stars:

David Backes, who plays alongside Oshie with St. Louis and Team USA, was even more complimentary outside of the Twitter.

“I think you’re going to see T.J. Oshie become a household name after that display he put on. The kids’ll be out on the pond probably in Minnesota right now, throwing a 5-hole on the goalie three or four times in a row. He does a great job for us in St. Louis. That’s part of the reason he’s on this team, along with some of the other things you can’t put on the stat sheet,” Backes said, according to the Associated Press.

And finally, let’s close out with a few funny tweets:


Why the U.S. kept sending Oshie out on the shootout

Oshie the shootout hero as U.S. outduels Russia in instant Olympic classic

Why the U.S. kept sending Oshie out on the shootout

Sochi Olympics Ice Hockey Men

After seeing the U.S. send T.J. Oshie out for a dizzying six shootout attempts in a 3-2 win against Russia on Saturday, many people probably asked: “Why?”

The 27-year-old has never scored more than 19 goals in his young career and is far, far down the list of the team’s most recognizable players.

To some, it was flabbergasting that U.S. head coach Dan Bylsma kept sending Oshie out while high-scoring forwards Phil Kessel, Zach Parise and Patrick Kane watched from the bench. Especially since Russia rolled out stars Ilya Kovalchuk and Pavel Datsyuk in the same situation.

VIDEO: Watch the entire shootout

But it worked, as Oshie nailed four of six, including the deciding tally.

If you want a little more background on Bylsma’s decision-making process, here’s a quick look at how Oshie has fared in shootouts at the NHL level:

  • Oshie is currently tied with Logan Couture and Jonathan Toews for the NHL lead in shootout goals with seven. While those players have connected on a bit more than 50 percent of their attempts, Oshie’s success rate is 70 percent this season.
  • He didn’t receive a ton of chances in the lockout-shortened 2012-13 season, but he connected on two of his three attempts.
  • Since coming into the league in 2008-09, Oshie has 25 shootout goals.

Does that mean he deserved every chance? That’s debatable … but it’s clear that there was plenty of logic behind what seemed to some like a strange strategy.

VIDEO: Al Michaels, Doc Emrick discuss game’s historical impact

Part of the plan

ESPN’s behind-the-scenes look at the U.S. team’s construction suggests Oshie was on the bubble for a final roster spot alongside the likes of Brandon Saad and Bobby Ryan. His shootout prowess may very well have been the tie-breaker, at least to U.S. GM David Poile.

“Oshie’s got that shootout move,” Poile said.

Oshie’s post-game reaction seems fitting, then; he told NBC’s Pierre McGuire that he was “running out of moves” as his attempts kept piling up.

As this great panoramic shot from AP reveals, his teammates seemed OK with him taking shootout shot after shot:

source: AP
Credit: AP

Oh, and in case you’re wondering about Oshie’s shootout strategy…

Oshie is a little shocked he made the U.S. Olympic roster


For every Olympic snub, there’s a player or two who surprised some by making the United States’ team on Wednesday. St. Louis Blues forward TJ Oshie didn’t deny his bubble status when reacting to the news, as the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Jeremy Rutherford reports.

“I was in shock a little bit,” Oshie said. “But very happy, very proud to be named to the team. Very, very excited to get to Sochi.”

He’ll join his fellow teammate David Backes, whose inclusion isn’t much of a surprise. Backes shared an amusing anecdote about hoping that he’d hear Oshie’s name during America’s announcements, which went in alphabetical order.

“I saw Orpik and I was trying to figure out the alphabet to see if ‘Os’ was before or after ‘Or,'” Backes said. “Then I saw the 74 coming and I almost jumped out of my chair I was so happy for Osh.”

(Good thing we’re not talking about the United States spelling bee team, huh?)

Overall, there will be three Blues on the U.S. team, as Kevin Shattenkirk accomplished something he “always dreamed of.”

A more recent dream means getting a break from Blues head coach Ken Hitchcock, a member of Team Canada’s staff.

“That’ll be a nice little two-week break,” Shattenkirk said. “Poor [Alex Pietrangelo] and [Jay Bouwmeester], they’re going to have to deal with it.”

The smack talk is starting already, but really, how often do you get to send a little your coach’s way?

Blues score three goals on first six shots, chase Rinne

Goalie Pekka Rinne #35 of the Nashville Predators looks on during a break in the action against the Colorado Avalanche at the Pepsi Center on March 30, 2013 in Denver, Colorado.
(March 29, 2013 - Source: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images North America)

Pekka Rinne’s first game of the year lasted less than 10 minutes.

The Nashville goalie, who underwent major offseason hip surgery, was yanked after allowing three goals on six shots to St. Louis on Thursday night, giving way for Carter Hutton to make his Preds debut.

Rinne, 30, allowed goals to David Backes, Vladimir Sobotka and TJ Oshie in a span of 7:40 before getting yanked, an extremely rough start to the year for a goalie that’s been nominated for two of the last three Vezina Trophies.

What’s more, Nashville was forced to rely on Hutton, a wildly inexperienced backup that had just one game of NHL experience heading into tonight.

That said, the move did provide a spark.

Mike Fisher scored less than a minute after Hutton replaced Rinne, cutting St. Louis’ lead to 3-1. The goal was the first of the year conceded by Blues netminder Jaroslav Halak, who looks to be carrying the No. 1 gig this season after splitting time over the last two years with Brian Elliott.

Related: Under Pressure: Pekka Rinne

USA Hockey announces 48-player Olympic camp roster

Patrick Kane

First came Russia. Then Canada. Now, the United States.

Following is the list of 48 players that have been invited to the U.S. Olympic orientation camp from Aug. 26-27 in Arlington, Va.

Goalies (6): Craig Anderson, John Gibson, Jimmy Howard, Ryan Miller, Jonathan Quick, Cory Schneider.

Defensemen (18): Zach Bogosian, Dustin Byfuglien, John Carlson, Dan DeKeyser, Justin Faulk, Cam Fowler, Jake Gardiner, Erik Johnson, Jack Johnson, Seth Jones, Nick Leddy, Paul Martin, Ryan McDonagh, Brooks Orpik, Kevin Shattenkirk, Ryan Suter, Jacob Trouba, Keith Yandle.

Forwards (24): Justin Abdelkader, David Backes, Beau Bennett, Nick Bjugstad, Dustin Brown, Ryan Callahan, Alex Galchenyuk, Patrick Kane, Ryan Kesler, Phil Kessel, Trevor Lewis, Kyle Okposo, TJ Oshie, Max Pacioretty, Kyle Palmieri, Zack Parise, Joe Pavelski, Bobby Ryan, Brandon Saad, Craig Smith, Paul Stastny, Derek Stepan, James van Riemsdyk, Blake Wheeler.

Goaltending is expected to be a major strength of the Americans, who fell in overtime to Canada in the gold-medal game in 2010. The U.S. also boasts tremendous speed, particularly up front — and remember that the 2014 Games will be played on the larger international ice.

While the Americans still may not have the defensive depth that Canada will bring to Sochi, they’re arguably deeper than they were three-and-a-half years ago in Vancouver.