Tag: Tie Domi

Tie Domi

Tie Domi says Toronto doesn’t play hard, arena has no atmosphere


Longtime NHL enforcer Tie Domi — he of the 3,515 penalty minutes — spent the majority of his playing career with the Toronto Maple Leafs, often saying he bled blue and white.

Thus explaining why he’s so disillusioned with the current state of the franchise.

“Nothing eats at me more inside than these guys not doing well,” Domi told the Toronto Star after attending the Leafs’ 3-0 loss to Carolina at the Air Canada Center. “When I sat down, it was a weird feeling. There was no atmosphere in the place.

“And I know why there’s no atmosphere. They’re out of the playoffs again. There’s nothing on the line. They haven’t made the playoffs for how long now?”

The answer, of course, is seven seasons — almost eight calendar years (that whole “lockout” thingy added to the futility.)

Domi was a member of the last Toronto team to make the postseason. So were Joe Nieuwendyk, Ed Belfour, Ron Francis and Brian Leetch — four guys that have since been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, as the Star’s Dave Feschuk astutely points out.

As such, Domi feels a special connection to the city come playoff time, and can’t believe the franchise hasn’t experienced postseason hockey for so long.

“I played in every one of those playoff games like it was my last,” Domi said. “I just don’t see that every shift from this team. I don’t see every guy playing hard every shift. They’ve got to start getting accountability in the room.”

Domi also shared his thoughts on a variety of other subjects, including Twitter.

“Twitter anything about our team — you should be fined,” he said. “My son is on the social media, but he’s 16.”

Quick piece for advice for Domi: Putting “the” in front of any technological innovation instantly makes you sound 78 years old. Not unlike when my grandma asked if part of my job involved “internetting.”

Tie Domi ordered to pay back $90,000 in loans

Tie Domi

You know how sometimes you sign your name to documents you don’t read as closely as you probably should? (And if you don’t ever do that, congratulations, you’re very responsible.)

According to the National Post, former NHL player Tie Domi claimed in Ontario Superior Court that he was misled into signing documents that unwittingly made him personally responsible for a Royal Bank of Canada loan to his company.

Domi’s excuse? The bank didn’t even give him time to read the paperwork. They just told him to sign here, here, here, initial here, full signature here, initial here, and here’s your money.

So when the bank asked Domi to pay back $90,312.09 in outstanding debts, he argued he wasn’t personally responsible for them.

Unfortunately for the ex-enforcer, the judge didn’t buy his argument and he was ordered to pay the money back.

Hopes destroyed: Wayne Gretzky says he won’t be in alumni game in Philly

Wayne Gretzky

It’s your daily dose of Winter Classic alumni game chatter.

The other day we opined about how the alumni game would go from “fun and nostalgic” to “truly great” if Wayne Gretzky would join in on the festivities on December 31st.

Leave it to ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun to go and talk to Gretzky himself and destroy all of our hopes and dreams.

As it turns out, Gretzky will be hanging out with his family for the holidays and for some bizarre reason, he thinks that no one wants to see him out on the ice.

“No, I’ll be with my family for the holidays,’’ Gretzky said. “Plus, they don’t need to see a 50-year-old slow guy out there!’’

It’s all right Wayne, seeing Mario Lemieux in Pittsburgh last year playing with the Penguins alumni wasn’t one of the coolest things we got to see or anything. In all seriousness, it’s good for 99 to stick by his family and spending the holidays in Philly is something weirdos like us would want to do.

While it’s expected that guys like Brian Leetch, Mike Richter, and Mark Messier would likely take a shot at playing in this game, getting an assortment of other characters in Rangers history would be fun too. Let’s make it a mish-mash of old crowd favorites and free agent pick-ups that didn’t pay off.

Bring us Tie Domi, Marty McSorley, John Ogrodnick, John Vanbiesbrouck and Bobby Holik. Hell, bring us Jeff Beukeboom too.

Most of all, bring us Pavel Bure. Make it an event New York, you’ve got the host of names to pull it off.

Wade Belak laid to rest today; Tie Domi speaks up about depression

Colin Wilson, David Legwand, Shea Weber

Friends and family of Wade Belak said their final good-byes to their fallen friend in Nashville as Belak’s funeral was held Sunday morning. The funeral was a private ceremony closed off to the public and while it’s still unknown exactly how Belak died, speculation continues to swirl over how depression played a role in his mental state. While that cloud still lingers on, his former teammates remembered him as one of the nicest guys off the ice.

Past teammates from Belak’s days in Toronto with the Maple Leafs as well as his most recent teammates from Nashville have talked about what a special guy he was. David Legwand even took out a full page advertisement in a Nashville newspaper to remember him by.

The Tennessean’s Josh Cooper caught up with former Toronto teammate of Belak’s, Tie Domi, to get his reflections on a guy who died too young. Domi said that the talk of Belak’s struggle with depression may have played a role in his death.

Following the service, Domi intimated that Belak may have suffered from depression, and it was a contributing factor in his death.

“This has to do with depression and getting the right message out there,” Domi said. “That depression can be beat. That’s what I want to do for him and his family is get the right message out there. Because the wrong message has been sent. Not just about hockey. This is about life. There are 3,500 people in Canada who commit suicide a year, 80 percent of them are men.”

Added Domi, “Wade was alone and he can’t be alone when you have these things going on. You have to call somebody.”

The cause of learning more about depression and finding ways to combat it and help those dealing with it on a daily basis is one that’s worth being educated about. If it proves to be true that Belak committed suicide, it makes an already sad story and makes it sadder. After talk from Belak’s mother and TSN host Michael Landsberg about how they knew of Belak’s struggle with depression, it would be tough to see that he took his life because it got to be too much for him.

Nothing is going to help bring him back, but if his death proves to be an example for people to learn about the perils of depression, Belak’s legacy could prove to help people with their own lives and mental health.

Report: Nathan Horton accused of throwing a water bottle at Lightning fans

David Krejci, Nathan Horton

As endearing as it was to see the Tampa Bay Lightning win Game 6 with such a spirited effort, a lot of the good feelings were ruined by a dispiriting showing by fans. Lightning fans made a misguided show of affection by showering the St. Pete Times Forum ice with noise-making devices that were called “rally drums” but looked like some evil manipulation of tennis rackets. (Hopefully the Lightning brass will do away with that promotion if the Lightning make it to the Stanley Cup finals or the franchise could suffer further embarrassment.)

Apparently that already-ugly situation was even worse than it looked, at least if one report is correct. Mike Corcoran of Lightning Insider posted two videos that seemingly capture* Nathan Horton throwing a water bottle at Tampa Bay fans.

It’s unclear what the NHL would do if Horton did, indeed, throw a bottle at fans. While these situations are far from equal, it brings to mind a few situations in the past.

  • Rick Rypien received a six-game suspension for essentially grabbing a Minnesota Wild fan. Obviously, that offense was more serious than Horton’s alleged water bottle toss.
  • John Tortorella earned a one-game suspension for Game 6 of the New York Rangers’ 2009 series against the Washington Capitals for squirting a water bottle and throwing it at a Caps fan. Here is what Colin Campbell said about the incident at the time.

“While it is a difficult decision to suspend a coach at this point in a playoff series, it has been made clear to all of our players, coaches and other bench personnel that the National Hockey League cannot — and will not — tolerate any physical contact with fans,” league disciplinarian Colin Campbell said in a statement last night. “We do not take this action lightly.”

That stance could be referenced liberally if the Horton footage is given legitimate credence.

It seems like Horton’s situation is most similar to what happened with Tortorella, but there are some differences. Tortorella is a coach, so one could argue that he is held to a (slightly?) higher standard than a player. The footage of Torts having a problem with the fan was far more official than the patchwork video evidence as well. There also might be more concern about suspending a player versus suspending a coach, especially since that suspension would come during a game that would decide which team represents the East in the Stanley Cup finals instead of a first round match.

There’s no guarantee that the league will need to address this situation at all since the evidence might be deemed shaky, but we’ll let you know if something happens. It’s an ugly situation for both sides: players must keep their cool and fans need to at least have a modicum of respect for the opposing team.

If there’s one silver lining to this story, it’s the possible end of those dopey rally drums (or whatever they are called) in Tampa Bay. If this somehow leads to the demise of Thunderstix too, then Horton’s work might transition from an embarrassment to indirect public service.

* – I use the phrase “seemingly capture” because it’s difficult to make a lot of the action out in the grainy video.