Tag: team stats

Henrik Lundqvist, Marcel Goc

Henrik Lundqvist, Rangers prove to be kings of the shootout


Earlier this afternoon, we took a look at the best forwards in the often-criticized “skills competition” known as the shootout. While Adam Gretz revealed that Los Angeles Kings forward Jarret Stoll might have enjoyed the best single shootout season, our all-time study produced names like Jussi Jokinen, Brad Richards and Pavel Datsyuk.

For the sake of completion, it seems right to also look at how goalies and teams fared. We’ll start with two netminder categories and then keep it simple by looking at the teams who’ve won the most games via the shootout since it premiered during the 2005-06 season.

In the first goalie category, let’s take a look at which goalies win the most. There’s one big caveat, though: while they are listed by quantity of wins, netminders who were below or near .500 were taken off the list. It wouldn’t be that impressive to include Tim Thomas when he’s 23-26 or Roberto Luongo when he’s 23-27, would it?

Categories: Wins, losses, save attempts, goals allowed and save percentage.

Goalie Wins Losses SA GA Sv %
Henrik Lundqvist 37 24 237 55 0.768
Martin Brodeur 35 19 191 54 0.717
Ryan Miller 31 20 175 52 0.703
Marc-Andre Fleury 27 15 130 31 0.762
Kari Lehtonen 24 15 127 37 0.709
Jonathan Quick 22 7 109 29 0.734
Rick DiPietro 19 10 123 33 0.732
Mathieu Garon 19 10 99 25 0.748
Johan Hedberg 18 6 93 19 0.796
Jose Theodore 17 9 93 27 0.71
Pekka Rinne 17 9 103 23 0.777


As you can see, the upper portion of the list is dominated by goalies who play a ton of games. That being said, those guys are well above .500, so it seems somewhat fair to call them successful. We’ll see which ones also rank highly in save percentage before we decide for sure, though.

One note with save percentage: it wouldn’t be fair to reward a goalie for a couple nice performances in the shootout, so I limited to netminders with at least 60 save attempts.

Categories: Save percentage, wins, losses, save attempts and goals allowed.

Goalie Sv % Wins Losses SA GA
Johan Hedberg 0.796 18 6 93 19
Pekka Rinne 0.777 17 9 103 23
Henrik Lundqvist 0.768 37 24 237 55
Antti Niemi 0.767 9 7 60 14
Marc-Andre Fleury 0.762 27 15 130 31
Jonas Hiller 0.75 14 8 96 24
Mathieu Garon 0.748 19 10 99 25
Jonathan Quick 0.734 22 7 109 29
Jimmy Howard 0.732 8 9 71 19
Rick DiPietro 0.732 19 10 123 33
Martin Brodeur 0.717 35 19 191 54
Antero Niittymaki 0.716 12 15 95 27
Tim Thomas 0.714 23 26 175 50
Carey Price 0.714 13 13 98 28
Jose Theodore 0.71 17 9 93 27


When you combine wins and save percentage, it seems like Henrik is the “king” of the shootouts among goalies. The smaller sample size group is topped by Hedberg, Rinne and Quick.

Perhaps the most important consideration is how NHL teams have fared in the grand scheme of things, though. To settle this, we can keep it pretty simple: by looking at who won the most and least amount of shootouts. Let’s look at the top five teams first.

1. New York Rangers: 46-31 (92 goals for, 74 against)
2. Dallas Stars: 44-31 (100 goals for, 79 against)
3. New Jersey Devils: 42-25 (88 goals for, 71 against)
4. Pittsburgh Penguins: 42-27 (82 goals for, 62 against)
5. Edmonton Oilers: 41-35 (88 goals for, 82 against)

Notes: I gave the Devils the tiebreaker because their winning percentage is a little higher. The Kings are the only other NHL team to reach the 40-win mark in shootouts.

Now let’s look at the bottom five.

26. Florida Panthers: 24-44 (56 goals for, 82 against)
27. Calgary Flames: 23-31 (55 goals for, 66 against)
28. Carolina Hurricanes: 22-25 (25 goals for, 55 against)
29. Philadelphia Flyers: 19-34 (48 goals for, 71 against)
30. Ottawa Senators: 18-33 (33 goals for, 65 against)

Not too surprisingly, the Rangers, Oilers and Stars were in the top three for most shootout appearances while the Hurricanes, Flyers and Senators made the least appearances. The Rangers have been in 77 shootouts (most overall) while the Hurricanes appeared in 47, making them the only NHL team with less than 50.

Is there much to take from the team totals? Maybe not, although it must be noted that the top five includes four regular playoff teams (and the lowly Oilers) while the bottom five includes four teams who struggle to contend for postseason berths (plus the occasionally mighty Flyers).

It’s dangerous to read too much into those results, but perhaps those teams who rarely make it to shootouts might want to try to hold on in order to reach that point more often. The Hurricanes’ 2010-11 season might not have ended with that crushing loss to Tampa Bay if they earned more than five extra points from shootouts, for one thing.

Noteworthy ‘other’ stats – Week 1 Edition


I tackled the typical points/goals/plus-minus leaders in an earlier post, so I thought I’d take a look at some of the odd stats from the first week of hockey. Small sample sizes can make for some strange numbers, so enjoy this look around the league. (Feel free to spout some strange stats of your own in the comments, too.)

  • Anaheim Ducks goalie Jonas Hiller leads the league in saves by a wide margin. He’s made 150 in four games played, 40 more than Washington Capitals goalie Michal Neuvirth made in the same amount of starts.
  • Dustin Brown and Chris Kunitz are tied for the league lead in hits with 19, but Brown did it in three games while Kunitz produced that many in four. Both are frequent hitters, but Brown has the best chance to land in the top 10 this season. Considering his ability to score between 20 and 30 goals, Brown could be a very valuable player in fantasy hockey leagues that include hits as a stat category.
  • To echo an earlier post about the Ducks’ tendency to take too many penalties, three Ducks lead the NHL in penalty minutes. Bobby Ryan has 27 so far this season, followed by Corey Perry (25) and Sheldon Brookbank (24). Paul Mara also ranks No. 8 in the league with 18. The first non-Duck is (wait for it) a member of the Philadelphia Flyers: Scott Hartnell (23).
  • Mikko Koivu is the best faceoff winner from a quantity standpoint so far this season. (I value total faceoff wins more than faceoff percentage because better centers take more draws and naturally will lose more than situational centers.) Despite playing in one less game than second place man Jonathan Toews (who went 54-38 for a 58.7 percent success rate in four games), Koivu succeeded in winning 55 out of 80 draws so far this season. That 68.8 winning percentage is not sustainable for a full season, but it’s the kind of stat that shows how valuable the underrated (but not underpaid) Finn really is.
  • Steve Montador leads the league in blocked shots with 15 in four games. There’s an “El Matador” pun in there somewhere, but I’m far too dignified to make it (naturally).
  • The Boston Bruins lead the league in shots per game with 39.5 (although they’ve only played two games so far) while the red-hot Dallas Stars average the least shots per game with just 21.7. The St. Louis Blues have given up the fewest shots per game so far (22) while the Ducks (46) and Phoenix Coyotes (39.5) have some work to do.
  • The Minnesota Wild converted a league-leading 43.8 percent of their powerplay opportunities so far this season, while the Florida Panthers and Montreal Canadiens are the only teams without a power-play goal in 2010-11.

So those are some interesting stats from the first week in the NHL. It should be interesting to see if any trends are forming or if a few players/teams are simply playing over their heads.