Tag: Tampa Bay Lightning

2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game One

Did Shaw bite Hedman? ‘It felt like it’ (Updated)


TAMPA — Four years ago, it was Alex Burrows on Patrice Bergeron.

This year? Andrew Shaw on Victor Hedman.

Yes, biting is once again a thing at the Stanley Cup Final, after Hedman suggested postgame that Shaw chomped down on him during a first-period scrum during Chicago’s Game 1 victory.

“It felt like it,” Hedman said. “I have a little bruise, so maybe.”

UPDATE: Statement from a league spokesman…

Hedman did complain to officials following the incident, a normal course of action for someone who feels he’s just been bit. And in that regard, it’s not unlike what happened four years ago.

Back in the Vancouver-Boston series of 2011, the Burrows-Bergeron bite — which occurred almost at the exact same time as Hedman-Shaw, right at the end of the first period of Game 1 — became one of the major early talking points. Burrows denied the act and wasn’t suspended, but the normally stoic Bergeron was livid, and took Burrows to task following the game.

“I don’t mind rough play and scrums at the end, as long as it’s just pushing and shoving and all that,” Bergeron explained. “But biting? I mean come on.”

It doesn’t seem as though this situation will go the way of B’s-Canucks. Things between the Bolts and ‘Hawks (and, more specifically, Hedman and Shaw) don’t appear to be as heated, and discipline from the NHL’s department of player safety is unlikely.

The NHL does review all in-game incidents. PHT has reached out to the league for comment.

Bolts lament passive third period: ‘We just sat back way too much’


TAMPA — Former Tampa Bay Lightning head coach John Tortorella used to have a saying:

Safe is death.”

On Wednesday night, his old team should’ve heeded that advice.

The Lightning played it safe in the third period of Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final and, without getting too hyperbolic, it basically killed them. It was the topic of conversation in the dressing room following the 2-1 loss, in which the Blackhawks rallied to score two goals in 1:58 in the third period — a period that saw the Bolts put just five shots on goal.

“You can’t take anything for granted against a team like that,” defenseman Anton Stralman said. “You can’t give them the room and space we did for 15 minutes in the third period. We just sat back too much and got away from our game a little bit.

“So, lesson learned.”

There were signs Tampa was reverting into a defensive shell in the second period, but the third was when the team really hunkered down. The Bolts rarely ventured forward and went over 13 minutes without registering a shot on Corey Crawford — this from a team that averaged close to 30 a night during the regular season.

“We just got away from playing smart defensive hockey and keeping pressure on them,” captain Steve Stamkos explained. “We’ve done it in the past. Whether it was chips and flips and getting rid of the puck, not making the confident play that we’ve made in the past.

“That’s a tough one to swallow.”

In Tampa Bay’s defense, some of this mentality might’ve carried over from an airtight performance in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final. At MSG, the Bolts smothered the Rangers in what was one of the team’s best checking performances of the playoffs; there was also that Game 7 mindset of killing time to get the win, which was clearly on display again tonight.

“Tonight in the third period we played almost a half-ice game,” head coach Jon Cooper explained. “Against a team like Chicago, you can’t let them keep coming at you the way we did.

“I thought we had chances to put them away. We didn’t put them away. And once you do that, to me, that was letting them hang around.”

Teravainen on comeback: ‘Great teams do that’

2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game One

TAMPA — Teuvo Teravainen hasn’t been with the Chicago Blackhawks for long, but he knows what they’re capable of doing.

Tonight, they fought back to win Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, scoring two late goals to beat the Lightning 2-1.

“Great teams do that,” said Teravainen, who got a wrist shot past a screened Ben Bishop at 13:28 of the third. Not even two minutes later, Antoine Vermette scored what would turn out to be the winner. 

“Just amazing,” said Teravainen. “Great comeback for sure. They got maybe a lucky one in the first there, but we bounced back. We started playing our game in the end. We just have to start in the first like that.”

Patrick Sharp, unlike the 20-year-old Teravainen, has been around this Blackhawks team. He was even there for the “dark days” of the franchise, before the two Stanley Cup victories in 2010 and 2013.

Sharp was asked if he’s come to expect comebacks like the one tonight.

“I don’t know if ‘come to expect it’ is the right way to put it, but we certainly believe in ourselves in our locker room,” he said. “We’re never out of any game, despite the score (or) how it looks out there. I thought our team got better and better as the game went on.”