Tag: stubhub

Winter Classic Hockey

Want last-minute tickets to 2012 Winter Classic? It’ll cost you


Want to get your hands on the best 2012 Winter Classic tickets that are available? If you base that assessment on cost alone, the asking price for tickets on Terrace 330 are just $9,999 each on StubHub.com as of this writing.

As Dan Gelston’s interesting Associated Press piece shows, the Winter Classic has morphed into a spend-happy spectacle on the scale of marquee events like Wrestlemania, college bowl games and (some might even say) the Super Bowl. Even the alumni games are becoming big business; the most expensive secondary market tickets are at an even $10,000 right now.

(Stubhub estimates that those tickets would arrive on Dec. 30. No word on whether or not they’ll be delivered in a armored vehicle within an envelope made of pure gold.)

Early estimates indicate that about 175,000 fans will attend “open-air events” revolving around the Winter Classic, from college hockey games to public skates.

It all sounds like an overwhelming behemoth of an event, which naturally spawns the next question: which city will be next? That is still to be determined, but the word is that the NHL would eventually like to hash out such plans 14-15 months ahead of time as the Winter Classic evolves.

By then, Stubhub auctioneers might just ask for your mortgage.

Need a ticket for tonight’s Game 7? Prepare to sell your limbs

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

Paying for Stanley Cup finals tickets is always going to be particularly expensive. Let’s face it, it’s the final series of the year and every game carries the weight of the world on it for the fans of the teams involved. Now take that feeling and ball it up and apply it to both teams for a winner-take-all Game 7. Sounds like the formula for the price of tickets to skyrocket doesn’t it?

In Vancouver, tickets are already hard to come by and are already really expensive. As CNBC’s Darren Rovell scoped out on Tuesday, it’s a special brand of situation for those looking to re-sell tickets on the secondary market as fans don’t want to give up their shot to see the Canucks potentially win their first Stanley Cup. Those tickets that are on websites to be bought are going for quite the hefty price.

Scoping out StubHub right now, if you’re looking for just one ticket to get inside Rogers Arena and you’re not picky about where exactly the ticket puts you in the building, it’ll cost you quite a bit.

As of this writing, buying one ticket will cost you $2,495, a price that will at least put you in the lower bowl behind the goal that will allow you to see how strong Roberto Luongo is or isn’t tonight for two periods.

If you’re looking to get any number of seats, the prices per seat go down a bit, but the total price you’ll pay still hurts. The cheapest pair of tickets you’ll get will put you in the upper level of Rogers Arena and run you $1,700 per ticket. A coll $3,400 gets you and a friend in to watch someone lift the Stanley Cup in Vancouver. That’s a lot of dough to drop especially when you’re not sure if you’ll be celebrating at the end of the night or end up being heartbroken depending on your allegiances.

One way or another, being able to be in attendance for a Stanley Cup finals game is incredible but if it means selling off personal possessions or family members it’s probably not the best move for your personal finances. That said, Vancouver’s been waiting for 40 years to see the Canucks lift the Stanley Cup and tonight they’ve got the chance to do that on home ice. For the city that saw Canada win the Olympic gold medal in 2010, this possibility is bit more personal no matter what the cost might be.

Plenty of Canucks fans buying tickets in Boston, Bruins fans not as willing to travel to Vancovuer


Yesterday we put up some rough statistics about aftermarket ticket prices following a cursory glance over at StubHub. Here’s the short story: tickets are expensive in Boston and crazy expensive in Vancouver. Since then, we’ve acquired a few more numbers directly from Stubhub to give a better picture of just how strong the demand has been for tickets this year.

Over 1,400 tickets combined for all four potential games in Vancouver. Fans are looking at prices in the $800 range just to get in the building. There are about 250 tickets for Game 1 on Wednesday and 500+ tickets for Game 2 on Saturday.

On the other hand,over 7,000 tickets combined for all three potential games in Boston. It’ll only cost fans in the $500 range to get into TD Banknorth Garden. According to the folks at StubHub, the prices have been holding steady since last week.

As far as actual tickets that have already been sold, fans are paying an average price of $900 for Games 1 and 2 in Vancouver. The least expensive ticket purchased has been $400 (Upper Bowl Goal 319, Game 1), while the most money shelled out for a ticket has been $3,500 (Club 106, Game 1). For a point of reference, fans were paying an average price of $720 for Games 1 and 2 in Chicago.

In Boston, things are a little cheaper; fans are paying an average price of $670 for Games 3 and 4 in Boston. The range of tickets purchased has been $375 (Balcony Side 330, Game 3) to $4,724 (Loge Glass 11, Game 3). At this time last year, fans were paying an average price of $575 for Games 3 and 4 in Philadelphia.

The most interesting figures have been where the ticket purchases have been coming from. Purchases for the games in Vancouver have been fairly predictiable: British Columbia 39% of purchases, Alberta 13%, Ontario and Washington each 8%, and California 7%. Who knew there were that many Bruins/Canucks fans in California? Surprisingly, buyers from New England states make up less than 2% of all purchases for games in Vancouver.

The story is a little different for the games being played in Boston. The top buyer states/provinces for the games in Boston are Massachusetts 36%, Ontario 11%, British Columbia 8%, New York 5%, New Hampshire and Alberta each 4%. New England states are accounting for 45% of the buyers for these games; but 25% of the buyers for these games are from Canada.

Do you think there will be a few Canuckleheads in Boston for Games 3 and 4?

Looking for last minute Stanley Cup Finals tickets? They’ll cost you


There’s an old adage in business: everything is available for the right price. Even though this year’s Stanley Cup Finals ticket is one of the hottest tickets in recent memory in Canada, anything can be acquired for the right price. We took a look at some of the average prices a few days ago here at Pro Hockey Talk, but here’s a rundown of what’s available on Stub Hub one day before the series starts. Obviously, tickets aren’t as prevalent and are more expensive in British Columbia than they are in Massachusetts. Unbelievably, the cheapest ticket listed before the series even starts for Game 7 is almost $1,300.

Stub Hub currently has 251 tickets available for Game 1 ranging from $812 per ticket (corner, upper bowl) to $3,540 per ticket for 3rd row seats near the blueline.
Game 2: 168 tickets available ranging from $799 to $3,995 per ticket
Game 5: 358 tickets available ranging from $971 to $7,589 per ticket
Game 7: 359 tickets available ranging from $1,298 to $15,000 per ticket

In Boston, things are a little cheaper at the TD Banknorth Garden. After all, they’ve seen their team win the Cup—albeit 38 years ago. Interestingly enough, these prices almost sound like a bargain after checking out the prices in Vancouver.

Game 3: 2,560 tickets available ranging from $480 to $5,500 per ticket
Game 4: 2,481 tickets available ranging from $499 to $10,000 per ticket
Game 6: 2,596 tickets available ranging from $593 to $10,000 per ticket

It’s amazing to think that it’s almost cheaper for someone in Vancouver to buy a ticket to a game in Boston and a plane ticket to get to the East Coast, than it is to stay in Canada and buy a seat in Rogers Arena. Judging by the way their fans travel, surely people have already given the travel option plenty of thought.

Then again, if the Bruins are up 3-1 going back to Vancouver for Game 5, I’m willing to bet those ticket prices might decrease a fair amount.

Update: Plenty more statistics regarding the Stanley Cup Final (including who is buying tickets where) can be found here.