Tag: strategies

Chuck Kobasew, Gabriel Landeskog, Kyle Quincey, Jason Garrison

Blocking shots: Mad genius or just mad?


One of the interesting little underground hockey debates revolves around blocking shots.

Any reasonable person will admit it’s a brave act, but the schism happens when you discuss the wisdom of doing so. The New York Times tackled the subject in an interesting way on Monday, studying the undeniable increase in the activity since the lockout while spotlighting heavy practitioners and the teams who generally abstain from the courageous move.

Many stats bloggers will say that a blocked shot is often the sign of a last-resort move by a defenseman who’s out of position.

Interestingly enough, The NYT’s Dave Caldwell spotlighted the three local teams and saw a wide variety of results. The lowly Islanders topped the NHL in the category and look primed to fall in first place again this season, but the East-leading Rangers swear by it too. Meanwhile, the traditionally stout Devils defense follows Paul Coffey’s lead in avoiding the practice.

Crunching simple numbers on the subject

source: Getty ImagesTo take a quick-and-dirty look at the potential big picture view, here are the top five teams as far as shot blocking, their place in the standings, total goals allowed and times shorthanded:

1. NY Islanders: 955 blocked shots, 55 points (tied for second to last in East), 159 goals allowed and 158 times shorthanded
2. Montreal: 942 blocked shots, 55 points (tied for second to last in East), 154 goals allowed and 214 times shorthanded
3. Toronto: 912 blocked shots, 62 points (eighth place in East), 166 goals allowed and 178 times shorthanded
4. NY Rangers: 907 blocked shots, 77 points (first in East, second overall), 110 goals allowed and 178 times shorthanded
5. Minnesota: 904 blocked shots, 58 points (12th place in West), 144 goals allowed and 193 times shorthanded

To take a look at the flip side, here are the five teams who block shots the least in the same categories:

26. Boston: 694 blocked shots, 70 points for second in the East, 120 goals allowed and 188 times shorthanded
27. Los Angeles: 691 blocked shots, 65 points tied for sixth in West, 124 goals allowed and 210 times shorthanded
28. Columbus: 661 blocked shots, 38 points for worst record in NHL, 185 goals allowed and 185 times shorthanded
29. Vancouver: 652 blocked shots, 74 points for second in the West, 138 goals allowed and 208 times shorthanded
30. New Jersey: 638 blocked shots, 66 points for sixth in the East, 155 goals allowed and 190 times shorthanded

I’m not sure if you can deduce much of anything from that little study, although it does seem to provide good evidence that you can play stingy defense without blocking shots. The low shot-blocking side seems a little heavier on “legitimate” contenders … but it also includes the horrific Blue Jackets. (Click here to check out NHL.com’s stats on shot blocking.)


How do you feel, though? Is the strategy a necessary evil to avoid goals or a bad gamble in terms of positioning and/or injuries? Share your take in the comments.

Bruins hope to cut down their mistakes, improve their neutral zone play in Game 3

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Two

It’s natural to blame the goalie and praise the goal-scorer when a game-breaking tally takes place. That was the case when Vancouver Canucks forward Alex Burrows foiled two Boston Bruins stalwarts (Zdeno Chara and Tim Thomas) on his way to that thrilling overtime game-winner.

Thomas definitely deserved blame for being overly aggressive on that play while many complained that Chara simply wasn’t aggressive enough. While people tend to focus on the end results, the genesis of these moments keep coaches like Claude Julien up at night.

It’s easy to throw Chara and Thomas under the bus, and again, they do shoulder some of the blame as Boston’s normally effective last line of defense. Still, the Bruins spoke of the “little things” that allowed that play to happen in the first place when they discussed their areas of improvement going into Game 3. Simply put, they cannot afford to make the same mistakes, with neutral zone gaffes often being the culprits considering Vancouver’s lightning-fast transition game.

Had Mark Recchi been able to corral Andrew Ference’s errant pass along the right wall at the start of overtime in Game 2 — or at least chip it into the Vancouver end — Sami Salo wouldn’t have been able to open up the defense with a quick outlet to Alexandre Burrows at the Boston blue line.

“It was a turnover in the neutral zone,” Patrice Bergeron said Saturday night. “I’m not sure how he got alone, but obviously he made the good fake to fake that shot and come around [Tim Thomas], but we got caught. We won the draw but we have to make sure we do a better job in the neutral zone.”

Added Ference: “We’re going for a quick transition. I think it was Recchi on my side, and instead of getting the right angle on his stick, I think their D-man was playing it tight and kind of one-touched it right back up the ice.”

Feel free to pick apart that goal in the video below, if you feel like it.

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If you ask some Bruins players, Game 1 ended in much the same way as Game 2: a transitional blunder bit Boston hard in the game’s waning seconds. This time around, it was defenseman Johnny Boychuk’s failure to get the puck to the neutral zone that made bad things happen. Yet once again, Corey Masisak points out that the situation could have been avoided if a better play was made earlier in the final minute.

The last-minute winner in each of the games so far has come when Boston was unable to put the puck behind the Canucks’ defensemen.

Had the puck gone below the Vancouver goal line in the final 30 seconds of Game 1, the Vancouver defensemen would not have been able to send a long diagonal pass to Ryan Kesler at the far blue line that started the ensuing scramble that led to Raffi Torres’ goal with 18.5 seconds left.

Watch that last-minute Torres goal in the video below.

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Obviously, the Bruins want to make crisper and wiser decisions. Of course, we would venture to guess that every defensive group that ever lost a game feels the same way. Little mistakes (and unlucky bounces) tend to pile up; Boston just needs to limit them as much as possible. For two straight games, they made errors at the worst possible times. We’ll see if they can correct some of their problems in Game 3, whether the mistakes come in their zone, Vancouver’s end or the neutral zone.