Tag: Stephen Walkom

Dwight King

Report: Dwight King won’t face discipline for boarding Alex Pietrangelo


Last night’s incident that saw Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo boarded and knocked out of the game thanks to L.A. forward Dwight King will reportedly not be investigated further by the NHL.

Los Angeles Times beat reporter Helene Elliott says the Kings have yet to hear from the league about the hit and they’re not expecting any further discipline for King.

The NHL’s head of officiating for the series, Kay Whitmore, explained the result saying referees Eric Furlatt and Stephen Walkom missed seeing Pietrangelo bleeding after the hit, something that would’ve turned King’s minor into a major.

Walkom has already been involved in two other high-profile incidents in the playoffs: Game 2 of the Rangers-Senators series that saw Matt Carkner go after Brian Boyle and Game 3 of the Coyotes-Blackhawks series where Marian Hossa was hit viciously by Raffi Torres, a play that resulted in no penalty called at the moment but a 25-game suspension for Torres.

NHL explanation on Dwight King’s hit: Officials “didn’t deem it violent enough for a major”

Dwight King, Kevin Shattenkirk

Last night’s Game 1 between the Blues and Kings wasn’t without controversy as L.A.’s Dwight King hit St. Louis’ Alex Pietrangelo from behind on a play many felt was worthy of a five-minute major. Pietrangelo left the game with an apparent head injury and may not be able to play in Game 2.

The NHL offered up an explanation as to what referees Stephen Walkom and Eric Furlatt saw on the play and chances are Blues fans aren’t going to like hearing it.

NHL supervisor for officiating in the Blues-Kings series Kay Whitmore says that the referees didn’t initially deem the hit to be violent enough to warrant a major penalty. As for what happened when Pietrangelo was cut and bleeding from the hit, Whitmore says had officials seen it, things would’ve been different.

“There was no visible blood. If it was running down his forehead or his cheek, it’s automatic. It’s a major game-misconduct. In this instance, they didn’t see it initially right away. They didn’t see the blood running down his chin, in his beard … one of those things.”

As for supplementary discipline, Whitmore says Brendan Shanahan’s office reviews everything and if they believe action should be taken, they’ll do it. If you missed the play, have another look at it here in last night’s highlights.

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Your Boston-Washington Game 7 officials are…

Stephen Walkom

The referees for tonight’s Eastern Conference quarterfinal Game 7 between Boston and Washington are Stephen Walkom (#24) and Eric Furlatt (#27).

Working the lines will be Greg Devorski (#54) and Steve Barton (#59).


— Walkom’s one of the league’s most veteran officials. He formerly served as the NHL’s vice president and director of officiating before coming out of retirement in 2009. He’s since worked the 2010 and 2011 Stanley Cup finals.

— Along with Dan O’Halloran, Walkom called the somewhat-famous “infraction free” Game 7 between Boston and Tampa Bay in last year’s Eastern Conference finals.

From Bob Ryan of the Boston Globe:

This was not just a game of clean, breathtaking, exquisite hockey. It was a game of clean, breathtaking, exquisite, and penalty-free hockey.

That’s correct. Neither referee Dan O’Halloran nor referee Stephen Walkom saw the need to raise his right hand to signify an infraction. That’s because no player wished to be the guy whose borderline tripping, slashing, boarding, interference, holding the stick, or any other kind of penalty would lead to a damaging power play. If this meant there was less hitting than one might expect, so be it.

Roughing? Are you mad? Not in this game.

“It was a credit to both teams’ discipline and attention to detail,’’ Boucher said.

“I think the referees tonight let the two teams decide the outcome,’’ declared Bruins mentor Claude Julien. “I thought the referees handled themselves extremely well.’’

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it marked the first penalty-free playoff game in the last 20 years.

— Walkom’s come under fire this postseason for his involvement in two controversial incidents. The first was the Matt Carkner-Brian Boyle “fight” during Game 2 of Ottawa-New York, the second was not calling a penalty on Raffi Torres for the Marian Hossa hit.

(Note: Walkom worked both those games with fellow referee Ian Walsh.)

— Furlatt’s claim to fame this postseason was working the contentious Game 3 between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. You know, the game that featured 24 minor penalties, six fighting majors, four 10-minute misconducts, three game misconducts and a match penalty.

(For more, read this piece in Sportsnet Magazine from Gare Joyce.)

— Devorski and Barton were the linesmen for Boston’s 4-3 overtime win in Game 6.