Tag: Stanley Cup hangover

Alex Ovechkin, Brad Marchand, Milan Lucic

Is the hangover real? Marchand and Lucic admit to lacking motivation in the playoffs


The season started with all sorts of talk about the Bruins suffering from a Stanley Cup hangover. That all got put away when they went on a 10-game winning streak and ran away with the Northeast Division title.

With how the Bruins season ended in a seventh game in overtime to the Capitals, however, what the Bruins are saying makes you wonder just how long a hangover can last. Brad Marchand and Milan Lucic tell CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty finding motivation this season was a lot harder and winning the Cup had something to do with it.

“It played a part in it. We had a long year, a short schedule and another tough season again this year. It made it a challenge to get prepared this year,” said Marchand. “You don’t notice it until after it happens. You’re obviously excited for the playoffs, but the hype of last year didn’t really feel the same [this year]. But at some point you have to find a way to get yourself engaged and prepare for the game.”

Lucic compared how much hockey the Bruins played the last two seasons and the schedule it provides to being like a baseball schedule. Lots of play and not a lot of time off. If words like these sound familiar, it’s because we heard the same from Chicago’s Duncan Keith last season as Brian Hedger from NHL.com shared when the Blackhawks found themselves down against Vancouver.

“This year for me was frustrating,” the reigning Norris Trophy winner said at O’Hare Airport after the Hawks returned from Vancouver. “I felt like it had really good stretches and then there (were) times I would just … I don’t want to say … lose focus, but just was not really … interested for whatever reason.”

Is the Stanley Cup hangover just a convenient excuse or, gasp, a narrative to play along with or is there truth in just being worn out and not having the motivation?

Sobered up Bruins now rampaging the East yet again

Tim Thomas; Patrice Bergeron

A funny thing happens when you string together a nine-game win streak — all that talk about a Stanley Cup hangover disappears. After spending most of the first month losing in frustrating ways, the Bruins are now taking those frustrations out on everyone they play. Instead of coffee and toast to shake off a hangover, the Bruins are going to devour opponents.

While the Bruins weren’t exactly scoring a ton of goals for the first month of the year, during their nine-game streak they’ve turned on the offense in a big way. The B’s have 42 goals over those nine games and have done their duty defensively as well dealing out three shutouts in that time and giving up just 14 goals.

Lighting the way for Boston are Tim Thomas and Tyler Seguin. Thomas has been his usual stellar self in goal while Seguin is taking the league by storm with his offensive breakout this season. With 11 goals and 21 points this year, Seguin is showing that he’ll be just fine in Boston. His line with Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand is proving to give other teams headaches and it’s Seguin’s skills that are making life impossible for opponents.

As for Thomas, ho-hum his numbers this season look just like his numbers in goal last year when he ran away with the Vezina Trophy. Thomas doing his thing last night in shutting out Montreal shows that even when Boston’s offense doesn’t show up, he can still win them the game.

While everyone’s decidedly hot on Pittsburgh right now, sleeping on the Bruins might provide for a rude awakening come playoff time if things shake out that way.

Maybe there’s something to that Bruins Stanley Cup hangover talk after all

Milan Lucic, Patrice Bergeron

After melting down against the Hurricanes last night, the Bruins are now 2-4-0 to start the season. The Bruins have been talking a lot early this season about how they’re not dealing with a Stanley Cup hangover, but after seeing Boston snap off at just about anything Carolina did to upset them and with “frustration” being the big word thrown around, it’s hard to not buy into the hangover talk.

Plenty of teams that goes deep into the playoffs, and even Stanley Cup winners, will go through the motions early in the year. It’s almost part of how thins go, but the Bruins’ troubles look a bit different given how they’re reacting. Too little emotion or way too much of it makes it look like the Bruins are trying to find themselves all over again.

For a team that lost just a handful of players in Mark Recchi, Michael Ryder, and Tomas Kaberle while gaining Joe Corvo and Benoit Pouliot that’s a lot of scrambling being done to find their way back to playing “Bruins hockey.” It’s all well and good to blow off steam in a game they’re struggling in, and the B’s will do that now and again, but for Boston the inconsistent play and the losses are the bigger problems. There are only so many things Zdeno Chara can do as captain to right the ship.

If they don’t find their groove soon, the chatter about a hangover will linger on like a bad headache a night after a bender with your friends. The Bruins just need to tap into what got them rolling along last year. Tough but smart play will win the day. Finding that level when everything seems to be going wrong, however, is the hard part.

Last two Cup champs faceoff in Chicago, hangover talk abound

Tim Thomas
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There’s a little more buzz whenever the last two Stanley Cup champions get together. Some people out there think this could eventually be a Stanley Cup preview for this season, but the Bruins have plenty of things to figure out with their game before they can start thinking about another deep playoff run. It’s early and they’ll have plenty of time to figure out their issues—but they do have issues.

There’s been some talk of a Stanley Cup hangover swirling around Boston in the early part of this season. The Bruins are off to a 1-3 start and have lost back-to-back games against the Colorado Avalanche and Carolina Hurricanes. Ouch. But they shouldn’t expect any sympathy from their opponents across the ice in Chicago tonight. After all, they went through the exact same thing last season.

All they have to do is look towards the Chicago Blackhawks if they want a cautionary tale. A season ago, the Blackhawks got off to a sluggish start and were constantly chasing opponents in the standings for the entire season. By the final day of the season, they needed a Dallas Stars defeat just to sneak into the playoffs. Their reward for the playoff berth was a date with the extremely talented, surging, and rival Vancouver Canucks. Needless to say, it’s a tougher path starting the playoffs as the 8th seed than it was when they were the 2nd seed and won the Cup.

Some people will tell you the slow start is really what cost the Hawks their season.

Fast-forward to this season and the Bruins are trying to avoid the same fate on the East Coast. The problem is that the early season losing has people looking for answers. Why is this team not as good as the one we saw in June? The roster is relatively the same, so it must be something—which is where the Stanley Cup hangover notion comes from. Defending Vezina/Conn Smyth/greatest ECHLer ever Tim Thomas knows that it can be a self-perpetuating prophecy:

“Of course there are effects [from winning the Cup], but I wouldn’t call it a hangover. By talking about it and by having it brought up in the media all the time, it brings it up into your conscious mind. It gives you an excuse or it allows you to think that way.

“The battle as a player is to not waste your time thinking in negative directions like that, and instead stay positive and in the moment. That was last year and this is a new year. If you want to have success, we need to focus on what each of us need to in each individual period and each individual game.”

Still, Boston has played uninspired hockey through the first week of the season and will look to find a spark against the highly-respected Blackhawks. Hawks’ star Patrick Kane certainly isn’t feeling sorry for the champs though:

“The [Bruins] are a great team. People talk about hangovers, but we lost 9, 10 guys from our team last year. They haven’t lost many and it seems they’ve made some improvements with guys like [Joe] Corvo coming over.

“If anything they’re just as good as last year, especially with guys like [Tim] Thomas and [Zdeno] Chara and their core guys they seem to be in pretty good shape. It will be a good test for sure.”

It’s easy to point towards a Stanley Cup hangover for the Bruins because their losing. The same can be said for the Chicago Blackhawks throughout the entire season last year. If the Hawks were the dominant team they were in 2009-10, there wouldn’t be any Cup hangover stories. Likewise, if the Bruins can find the game that helped them win it all last season, everyone can put this hangover talk to bed—once and for all.

It could start tonight with a win against the Blackhawks.

Slow starts plague Bruins, Canucks early in season

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven
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Much like two friends who go drink-for-drink during a binge, both the Boston Bruins and Vancouver Canucks are seemingly dealing with Stanley Cup hangovers. (The Bruins lost to the Hurricanes while the Canucks fell to the Flyers tonight.)

The two teams that made it to the 2011 championship round have combined for two wins in seven games so far. They’re losing in different ways, but to extend the metaphor, both seem like they just want to sleep late instead of getting to work on time.

For the defending champion Bruins, it seems like they’ve been a little flat to start games. Their offense has been stagnant in general, but it’s been more pronounced in the first period; they’ve scored just one of their seven goals in the opening stanza. That happened when they were still riding the high of a banner-raising ceremony, so the B’s must find a way to find an early spark more often.

That spark isn’t coming from the usual suspects like injured center David Krejci or top-line wingers Milan Lucic and Nathan Horton, but at least the B’s are showing some promise from Tyler Seguin and solid work from their goalies.

On the other hand, the Canucks keep shooting themselves in the foot early on. The instinct is to assume that Vancouver’s talented group has a feeling that they can just “turn it on” and win games late, but that’s been a dangerous instinct so far. It worked out against the Columbus Blue Jackets; the Canucks had more penalties (three) than shots (two) in the first period, but wrangled a 3-2 win after revving up the pressure in the third.

That didn’t work out so well tonight against a legitimate contender in the Philadelphia Flyers, though. The Canucks took the game’s first four penalties, which allowed Philly to take a 3-1 first period lead that they managed to preserve with a 5-4 win.

The Canucks didn’t look sharp in their season opener against the Penguins, either, as they went down 2-0 and 3-1 but managed to squeeze out a charity point.


Seven games between two teams is a small sample, but the Bruins and Canucks shouldn’t rest on their laurels, either. They need to remember that their past accomplishments will only make teams try that much harder to curb their future success.