Tag: Stanley Cup Final

Boston Bruins v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game Four

Nathan Horton returns to the ice for first time since Cup final concussion


It’s been 112 days since Nathan Horton lay motionless on the TD Garden ice during Game 3 of the Stanley Cup final. Since then the Bruins came roaring back to win their first Cup in 39 years, the Stanley Cup has toured the globe with the B’s, and Horton has slowly but surely recovered from his severe concussion. Sunday night’s preseason game against the Montreal Canadiens provided Horton his first opportunity to get back on the ice and find out exactly where his recovery stood. If his game against the Habs is any indication, Horton will be just fine when the Bruins open up their season against the Flyers on October 6.

Nathan Horton admitted there were butterflies flowing before the Bruins “home” game in Halifax:

“I was a little nervous coming in, just from what happened. I was just trying not to think too much — just work hard and do the little things. I didn’t feel too bad, to tell you the truth. It felt a little bit different being on the ice, but it felt OK.”

Maybe he should feel nervous more often. Horton posted two assists in the third period and looked good overall as the Bruins laid the hammer on the Canadiens to the tune of 7-3. Putting up points in one thing—but showing that he could withstand the physical part of the game was just as important as any goals or assists. Joe Haggerty from CSN New England shared his thoughts as Horton took the ice for the first time since the brutal hit that ended his season in the Cup Finals last year:

“Good first test run for Nathan Horton tonight. Got a few bumps and bruises, but didn’t seem hesitant or jumpy with the puck at all. Horton also looked very good with Seguin skating on the line with him both in practice and in tonight’s game.”

To say Horton’s line with Tyler Seguin and Jordan Caron looked good all night would be an incredible understatement. Then again, when a team drops a touchdown and wins by four goals, it’s safe to say that just about the entire team looked good. Still, it was an important first step for a guy who the Bruins will depend upon this season for scoring and physical play this season. For an organization that is still coming to grips with Marc Savard’s questionable future, any positive news on the concussion front should be greeted with cheers of optimism.

Remember, this isn’t that will be satisfied with another playoff appearance or a series win. If the Bruins want to repeat their success from the 2010-11 season, they’ll need all of their horses playing at the top of the game. Horton’s first game back showed that he’s well on his way to making a quick and relatively speedy recovery.

For anyone who saw the hit he took last June, his return is encouraging news in the aftermath of a very scary incident. Here’s to hoping we see more players recover and return from their concussions in the near future.

Cup Final riot investigation conclusion: “there were too many people and they were too drunk”

Riot Breaks Out After Game In Vancouver

Remember the aftermath of Game 7 of the Stanley Cup final? No, not Zdeno Chara’s primal scream; nor Mark Recchi’s last game as an NHLer. We’re talking about the night that a segment of Vancouverites decided to loot and light their city on fire (insert Montreal joke here). In the wake of the disaster, the powers that be thought it would be a good idea to order an independent review of the night’s events. Everyone knew it was a horrible incident that was an embarrassment for one of the most beautiful cities in North America—but why? What caused the night to go horribly wrong? Aside from the Canucks winning the Cup, what could have been changed on June15th to avoid the humiliating riot that filled the streets of Vancouver?

NHL.com is reporting that the independent review’s findings have been released today in the form of a 396-page report. The findings are predictable to say the least:

“Keefe and Furlong offered two major problems from that day — there were too many people and they were too drunk — while offering 53 recommendations for future preparation and prevention with similar events.

According to the report, there were 155,000 people in downtown Vancouver when the Boston Bruins defeated the Canucks in Game 7. There were 446 police officers on duty in the area early in the day, and that number swelled to 928 by the end of the night — more than four times the number on duty when there was a riot during the 1994 Stanley Cup Final and two-and-a-half times the number for the gold-medal game at Rogers Arena during the 2010 Winter Olympics.

Keefe said part of the problem was deployment of the police officers was slow in the afternoon and the transition to tactical gear took as long as 40 minutes for some units after the order to do was given. He also noted, however, that a smoother deployment would not have prevented a riot from happening.”

Let’s make sure we have this straight: too many drunken people in too close of a proximity to each other, in an emotionally charged environment, without enough police supervision will lead to problems. Glad to hear it only took two months to come up with that kind of hard hitting analysis.

One of the authors of “The Night The City Became A Stadium,” Douglas Keefe and John Furlong, went onto say that the crowd of 155,000 people was “unpredictable.” To say that the crowds were unpredictable is naïve at best—but more likely disingenuous. Everyone around the hockey world knew there was going to be a huge crowd in the streets that night—common sense told us the crowd would be bigger for Game 7 than they were for Game 5 and Game 6. People knew that if the Canucks lost, there was a high likelihood for civic misconduct. None of this is second guessing: people were talking about the consequences before the game even started.

The report states that the city and police learned valuable lessons from the 1994 riot that followed the New York Rangers Stanley Cup victory over the Canucks. Unfortunately, even though the city was equipped with the lessons of the past, the independent review still had 53 recommendations for the city in the event of a similar circumstance in the future.

Good to know that if the Canucks lose in the Finals again, rioters will have to be more creative than getting drunk and looting with 1,000 of their closest friends.