Tag: Stan Mikita

Bobby Hull

Fanspeak: Bobby Hull voted greatest Blackhawk in franchise history


This summer, NBC Sports’ social media team is conducting the #NHLGreatest initiative, designed for fans to choose the best player in each franchise’s history. Balloting was conducted through three platforms — Facebook, Twitter and Instagram — with thousands of votes being cast. The results of this initiative will be released throughout the month of August, in conjunction with PHT’s Team of the Day series.

Chicago Blackhawks

1. Bobby Hull — 1,074 votes

2. Stan Mikita — 528 votes

3. Patrick Kane — 320 votes

4. Jeremy Roenick — 225 votes

5. Other — 368 votes

He’s scored the most goals in Chicago Blackhawks history with 604 and he’s second to Stan Mikita in points and games played. Yes, Bobby Hull, “The Golden Jet”, was the icon in Chicago.

With the Blackhawks, he was the first NHL player to score 50 goals in 1960 and led them to the Stanley Cup in 1961. He also led the NHL in goals seven times before parting ways with Chicago rather acrimoniously to play for the Winnipeg Jets in the WHA. Check out what Hull told Sean Fitz-Gerald of the National Post in 2010 about how the older Bobby Hull would’ve advised the younger him.

“Um, I would have to say, ‘You’re backed in a corner, son. Go to it.’ That’s exactly what happened. [Chicago] backed me into a corner, they never offered me a contract while they were off floating around in their 110-foot ship in the Caribbean. They didn’t seem like my 15 years of blood, sweat and tears for them made any difference. They pissed me off, a few years before that, on a number of occasions.”

Despite the ugly parting, he’s a man forever etched into the memories of Blackhawks fans for what he did to electrify the city in the 60s and 70s.

Considering all the success the team has had in the past few years, you’d think Kane or Jonathan Toews would’ve earned a few more votes, but it looks like hardcore ‘Hawks fans did their part to recognize the all-time greats.

Let’s look at what career accomplishments Selanne might achieve in 2012-13

Teemu Selanne

As we previously reported, Selanne has decided to put off his retirement for at least one more season and sign a one-year, $4.5 million deal with the Anaheim Ducks.

He’s currently the oldest active player in the NHL at 42, but he seems to be immune the aging process that mere mortals like us experience. Last season he had 26 goals and 66 points in 82 games and reached the 1,400 career points mark in the process. So what other accomplishments could he add to his Hall of Fame-worthy career?

Let’s take a look…

— If Selanne can stay relatively healthy and play in at least 59 games, then he’ll become either the 32nd, 33rd, or 34th member of the 1,400 games club. Jaromir Jagr will enter the season with a five game lead on him and Roman Hamrlik is just 21 contests away.

— Selanne currently ranks 19th with 1,406 career points. If he gets even 20 points next season, he would surpass Bryan Trottier and claim sole possession of 15th place on the All-Time list. After that, Stan Mikita currently holds 14th place with 1,467 points, so Selanne would need another season comparable to his 2011-12 campaign to beat him.

— Selanne is already the Ducks’ career leader in points, but with 63 more he’ll become the first Anaheim player to record 1,000 points while wearing their uniform.

— Selanne needs to find the back of the net just five times to tie Luc Robitaille, who currently ranks 10th on the All-Time goals list with 668. The wrinkle is that Jagr has 665 career goals, so it will be a race between the two aging superstars to see who can surpass Robitaille first.

Mario Lemieux is ninth with 690 goals, Steve Yzerman ranks eighth with 692, and Mark Messier has 694 goals. All three of those legends are within reach, although obviously Jagr or Selanne would need to have a great season to surpass any of them.

— Selanne also currently ranks fourth with 248 career power-play goals, which is just one shy of Phil Esposito and third place.

— Selanne isn’t nearly as high up in the assists charts, but he’s just seventh away from becoming the 42nd player to ever reach the 750 assists milestone. Joe Thornton became the 41st member of that club last season.

Video: Blackhawks reveal Bobby Hull, Stan Mikita statues

Stan Mikita, Bobby Hull

For newbie fans, the Chicago Blackhawks’ greatest duo might already be Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews.* The truth is that those two players have a long way to go to eclipse the team’s legendary one-two punch of Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita.

Former owner Bill Wirtz rubbed the two former players the wrong way during his time as owner, but the team rebuilt their ties with the two aging faces of its franchise once Rocky Wirtz took over. The icons have been invited back for various events, but Saturday night featured a fitting moment: the team revealed statues for both of them in a classy ceremony.

Check out video of the announcement below.

* – Oddly, no one’s really making an argument for Eric Daze and Alexei Zhamnov.

PHT’s Morning Skate: Jaromir Jagr is a maniacal workout machine

Jaromir Jagr

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Kevin Weekes explains what makes Jaromir Jagr as good as he is at age 39. Hint: He’s more than just a rink rat. (NHL.com)

Kings forward Trevor Lewis is trying to figure out a nickname for new guy Mike Richards. With Brad Richardson in town, it’s a good thing they didn’t also get Brad Richards this summer. Everyone can’t be “Richie”… Can they? (Mayors Manor)

Like it or not, Bill Simmons is becoming a Kings season ticket holder this year because he won’t have the Clippers to obsess over. (Grantland)

Jo Innes at Backhand Shelf examines what goes into treating a Taylor Fedun-like broken femur. Trust her, she’s a pro. (Backhand Shelf)

Blackhawks will unveil statues for both Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita on Saturday (Chicago Tribune)

Some Buffalo Sabres are getting skating training from Dawn Braid. Yes, she’s a figure skater. Now where’s D.B. Sweeney? (Sabres)

Hal Gill will play in his 1,000th career game against the team he won a Stanley Cup with in Pittsburgh. The S.S. Gill sails again. (NHL)

Finally, here’s Winnipeg first round pick Mark Scheifele scoring his first NHL goal. In before going back to juniors?

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: Chicago Blackhawks


You can’t really mess with the best, and the Chicago Blackhawks have arguably the best looking sweaters in the NHL. While the early part of their history saw them figuring things out, once they adopted the color red and committed to the Indian, they’ve been rocking an iconic look they haven’t given up on in over 50 years. Everyone from Bobby Hull to Stan Mikita to Denis Savard to Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane have all rocked essentially the same look and they’ve made it look legendary all along.

Best: The Blackhawks have been around for a long time and it wasn’t until the mid-1950s when they got their look to be fully memorable. The red road sweater (their current home look) is the thing of legends. With the Native American head on the front, the bold red color with black and white stripes and the letter “C” with the tomahawks crisscrossing over it it’s a look that’s impossible to beat. No wonder they haven’t really changed their look since 1955. Once you achieve greatness, you don’t mess with it.

Worst: In recent years, some felt they could do something to give the fans a little bit extra and give the classic Blackhawks look in a new color. Rather than red, they took their look and put it on a black jersey. This wasn’t the greatest idea. Going with the black jersey muted out any of the other colors offered up from the logo and eliminated red from the picture. While that could’ve come in handy in games against Detroit, it just looked bad. Don’t mess with greatness.

Old-Timey Goodness: Before the Blackhawks broke out their styling duds that they wear now, they went through phases where they went from a straight black and white look with stripes all over to one that added the color red. The main feature of all these was a circular logo that incorporated the Indian’s head. The best of the bunch is the one from 1935-1937 that provided the inspiration for the Blackhawks’ Winter Classic sweater in 2009 that cut down on the number of stripes, made the circular logo bigger and set it on an off-white center stripe/background. It’s an old school classic.

Assessment: What the Blackhawks do sweater-wise these days is generally perfect. They’ve had the same style since the mid-50s and the only addition they’ve made recently is adopting the Winter Classic sweater as their alternate sweater. Adding another classic look to a stable of beautiful looking sweaters is just making a great thing even better. It’s hard to argue with calling Chicago’s sweaters the best in the league, although there’s a couple other original six teams with equally solid arguments.