Tag: Shaone Morrisonn

Ales Kotalik

Sabres welcomed to life under the salary cap by sending Kotalik and Morrisonn to AHL

In the current NHL, teams that spend a bit too much in the offseason and find their salary cap situation to be problematic. The Blackhawks had that problem last summer and this time around it was the Buffalo Sabres who found themselves above the fold after owner Terry Pegula shelled out the big bucks to get Christian Ehrhoff and Ville Leino into town.

Rather than do things the way Chicago did it by dealing away valuable players making slightly unmanageable salaries, the Sabres took the route most traveled by teams looking to get under the cap: Sending guys to the AHL.

Ales Kotalik and Shaone Morrisonn, making a combined $5.075 million against the salary cap, will be starting their seasons in Rochester with the Americans rather than in Buffalo with the Sabres. It’s all because their salaries are a bit too much for the Sabres to manage. Kotalik and Morrisonn are both potentially useful players, although not premiere players, and could be a good fit in Buffalo (or anywhere else in need of a part-time scorer or physical defenseman) but their cost to play is too rich for anyone’s blood.

While no one is going to feel bad for guys making $3 million (Kotalik) or $2.075 million (Morrisonn) to play hockey anywhere, being priced out of the NHL is part of the harsh reality of life in the NHL. Players are more than entitled to get whatever an owner wishes to pay them to play, but when their play gets matched or exceeded by players making less money, those are the breaks. Just ask Wade Redden of the New York Rangers about that.

source: Getty ImagesThe Rangers gave Redden a monster free agent contract and now he’s likely doomed to stay in Hartford until his deal runs out because his cap hit is obscenely high for the kind of play he brings. Does that make Redden a bad player? Not at all, he’s just not worth it at the cost that comes to the Rangers against the salary cap. Same goes for Chicago and Cristobal Huet.

While this is how life goes in the NHL these days and this is how teams can sidestep financial missteps, there’s just something that feels cheap about being able to cover up financial errors like this. The hopes that teams below the salary floor would be there to absorb those mistakes have, for the most part, not happened. Teams like the Islanders, Coyotes, Jets, and Predators all found alternative ways to go about business without taking on a potentially brutal contract.

Last season the New Jersey Devils ran into cap issues and tried to find a new home for Brian Rolston. Rolston came with a $5.062 million cap hit and for two seasons at that amount, there weren’t any buyers. When this summer rolled around and Rolston was entering the final year of his deal, however, the Islanders happily swooped in and traded for the 38 year-old winger to help bring themselves to the salary floor.

Guys like Morrisonn and Kotalik are in the final year of their contracts and while that can prove to be motivation to earn a new deal, they’ll have to show they can bring it big in the AHL to hopefully get moved to another team that has a need.  Having to prove yourself in the AHL when you’re an NHL-caliber player makes the task seem Sisyphus-like when the boulder you’re pushing uphill is a salary that most teams can’t bear to have.

40 players put on waivers; Sabres plan to get under salary cap becomes evident

Shaone Morrisonn
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It’s an inevitable part of training camp when players are released, cut, or waived. Today, 40 players were placed on waivers by 11 different teams. Among the notable names are two guys who are necessary for their teams to stay under the salary cap in Chicago’s Cristobal Huet and New York Rangers’ Wade Redden. With those players waived, Huet will head back to Europe to play while Redden is destined for the AHL.

A pair of names from Buffalo that landed on the waiver wire were forward Ales Kotalik and defenseman Shaone Morrisonn. The Sabres are currently over the salary cap by more than $3.5 million according to CapGeek.com. By putting Kotalik and Morrisonn on waivers with the purpose of sending them to the AHL and get their salaries off the books, they’ll free up $5.075 million.

Kotalik has a cap hit of $3 million while Morrisonn is set in at $2.075 million. Life in the NHL isn’t always fair and a spot in the big show is never guaranteed, especially when your job can be done by someone with a much lower cap hit. In Morrisonn’s case, his spot on the blue line can be taken by either Mike Weber or Marc-Andre Gragnani. Kotalik’s spot at forward was the most flexible one to be taken as the Sabres have a host of younger players to fill their needs on the wings on their third and fourth lines.

Both Kotalik and Morrisonn came into training camp hoping to prove they could stick with the big team. With the cap crunch being as hard as it was for the Sabres, both players would’ve needed to show above and beyond in camp that they belong in the NHL. While they might’ve been doing that, getting their salaries off the cap and into the AHL makes too much sense for Buffalo. By dumping those two players into the AHL, the Sabres can now get under the cap by nearly $1.5 million. It might not be great business, but it’s how life is with the cap.

To see the full list of those who were waived today, TSN has the full list.

Shaone Morrisonn eager to prove he can stay in Buffalo lineup

Shaone Morrisonn
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When Buffalo signed Shaone Morrisonn before last season as a free agent, he was brought in to give the Sabres a physical presence on their blue line and provide stability there. Instead, Morrisonn struggled a bit with injuries and didn’t quite fulfill what he’d hoped to do for the team.

After a wild offseason for the Sabres that saw owner Terry Pegula open up the vault and allow GM Darcy Regier to go wild and fill the team and their payroll up, Morrisonn sees a newcomer in Christian Ehrhoff join the team. He also sees younger guys like Mike Weber and Marc-Andre Gragnani step up late in the season and push for starting jobs on the blue line.

With the Sabres over the salary cap by more than $3.5 million according to CapGeek.com, Morrisonn and his $2.075 million cap hit this season could be bound for another city via trade or for Rochester and the AHL. Morrisonn is out to prove that he can still play well and make it worth the Sabres while to keep him around as he told Bill Hoppe of the Niagara Gazette.

“There’s going to be some competitiveness in training camp, and you’re going to have to earn a spot. I think that’s great.”

Has Morrisonn thought about playing in the AHL for the first time since the 2004-05 lockout?

“Anything can happen — trades, getting moved,” Morrisonn said. “We’re over the cap, obviously. They got to make some moves. But I can’t really focus on that. I got to just focus on playing on the ice and competing and showing them what I got, and that’s all I can control.”

Morrisonn, who arrived in town Wednesday, said he hasn’t spoken to Ruff or general manager Darcy Regier yet. Clearly, though, Morrisonn wasn’t expecting this situation when he signed with the Sabres last August.

“I’m a gritty defenseman,” Morrisonn said. “I’m not afraid get physical and use my body and use my wheels. That’s what they got me in (for) last year. It’s just exciting to be here. (We’ll) see what happens. I want to be a part of this.”

Morrisonn’s main competition in training camp, if his salary isn’t his biggest road block that is, would be 23 year-old Mike Weber. Weber plays a similar sort of game. He’s tough defensively, physical, and has a big shot from the point as well. Morrisonn will have to show that he’s capable of doing more than Weber and the other defensive-defensemen in camp to keep his job. With the Sabres needing to get under the cap, Morrisonn is going to have to do a lot of big things in a short amount of time.

At the very least, if Morrisonn can prove himself worthy of a starting job, he could draw interest from teams in need of a guy like him. While he wants to see things through in Buffalo, staying in the NHL would be preferable to being sent to the AHL in salary exile. The battle for him to stay in Buffalo’s lineup will be worth watching.

Ales Kotalik hopes to learn from struggles as he reunites with Sabres

Mike Fisher, Ales Kotalik

The Buffalo Sabres turned a lot of heads with their 2011 summer spending spree, but GM Darcy Regier still has some work to do. The team is about $3.6 million over the salary cap ceiling as of this moment, which means that something has to give.

Regier and owner Terry Pegula are saying all the right things about moving that money through trades, but the team would be left with some unpleasant options in most of those cases because rival GMs know that the Sabres are in a cap crunch. That could mean that the Sabres might need to sweeten deals by sending a high-end draft pick with one of those contracts to get a deal done or some other headache-inducing situations.

Ultimately, if I were Regier, I’d beg for permission to bury at least one mediocre contract and then complete a more comfortable move to get under the cap. Don’t forget that merely getting under the cap might not be the only goal; what happens if the Sabres suffer enough small injuries that they cannot put anyone on injured reserve but they don’t have the space to call up someone from the minors?

My solution would be: “Bury Ales Kotalik’s cap hit + trade an expendable bigger contract,” whether that be Jochen Hecht, Brad Boyes or Shaone Morrisonn.

Of course, that formula cannot factor one thing: Regier’s soft spot for Kotalik. Out of context, it seemed obvious that the Sabres accepted Kotalik merely to make sure that they could land Robyn Regehr in a trade, but if any team is open minded about the winger, it’s Buffalo. Kotalik crossed the 20+ goal barrier four times during his first stint with the Sabres before he was traded to the Edmonton Oilers in 2008-09. It’s been a rocky three seasons since then, with Kotalik being traded two more times before being demoted to the AHL. Kotalik should have gotten a taste of the harsh reality in front of him after every other NHL team passed on claiming him via waivers on two occasions.

The odds seem stacked against Kotalik, who is in the last year of a contract that registers a $3 million cap hit. That being said, the Czech-born winger seemed upbeat in an interview with the Buffalo News’ John Vogl earlier this week.

Last season’s stay in the AHL was a rejuvenating event, but Kotalik made it clear he has little desire to do it again. The 32-year-old believes he belongs in the NHL. He’s intent on proving that to the Buffalo Sabres when training camp starts in three weeks.

“Absolutely, I want to stay in Buffalo,” Kotalik said by phone from the Czech Republic. “I’m coming to training camp with an open mind. I know that I can measure with anybody on that team. I can measure myself up with any guy on that squad, on that team, and I hope I will get the opportunity that I need. Everything else is up to me.”


“I’m excited coming over to see all the people I missed for two years,” said Kotalik, who was shipped by Buffalo to Edmonton at the 2009 trade deadline. “When I heard that I was part of the trade with Robyn Regehr, at first I didn’t know what to think. Then I got a call from [General Manager] Darcy [Regier] and Terry, and they told me that they took me for a reason. They still think that I can play.

“I’m excited. It feels like I’m at home, and hopefully I can prove to everybody who had doubts about me that I can still play and be a good player for that team.”

Again, if there’s any team that will give Kotalik the benefit of the doubt, it’s the Sabres. He’ll have to be very impressive to overcome his hefty cap hit and damaged reputation, though. We’ll keep an eye on the team’s interesting salary cap challenges as the season approaches – it might indeed come down to training camp for the team’s fringe players. Kotalik certainly ranks as one of those, even in Buffalo.

Who will the Sabres trade to get under the salary cap?

Philadelphia Flyers v Buffalo Sabres - Game Six

Remember when the Buffalo Sabres were one of the “have-nots” in the world of professional hockey? Only four short summers ago, the Sabres organization was trying to justify the exodus of Daniel Briere and Chris Drury. Even though they were coming off two consecutive Eastern Conference Finals appearances and their first ever President’s Trophy, they were faced with the reality that they simply couldn’t afford two of their best veterans. In the four seasons since Drury and Briere left town, the Sabres haven’t won a single playoff series.

Oh, how things can change in a hurry. Since Terry Pegula took over earlier this year, the Sabres have morphed from a team that watches their good players leave, to a team that acquires other teams’ good players. With the change in philosophy and budget, come a completely different set of problems. Sabres GM Darcy Regier summed up the exceptional offseason quite nicely to Sean Fitz-Gerald of the National Post:

“…it’s so distinctly different than what we’ve done in the past. We’ve had decent resources in the past. Now we have extraordinary resources.”

Different resources have brought about different offseason problems. In the past, the team would have to deal with players who left on their own accord. Nowadays, GM Regier must figure out which player(s) the team can live without as they shed salary to get under the cap. According to the incomparable capgeek.com, the Sabres payroll is sitting at $67.9 million, while the salary cap for next season is only $64.3 million. It doesn’t take a math major to see that GM Regier still has some work to do before the season starts in October.

Conventional wisdom said that the Sabres would simply bury a contract or two in Rochester for the season to get the payroll under the salary cap. Would Shaone Morrison’s $2+ million contract cost him a spot in the NHL? Would Ales Kotalik get moved? Would it be fiscally responsible to waive Brad Boyes’ $4 million contract? These were the types of questions that Regier was expected to answer.

Now comes word that Regier isn’t looking at his roster for players to waive—he’s looking for players who he could trade. Sabres blog Die By The Blade has already started speculating which players could be on the trading block:

“The first has to be Shaone Morrisonn who had a less than spectacular season with the Sabres last year. Morrisonn had one goal and four assists in 62 games with the Sabres and has one year left at a rate of $2.075 million left on his contract. In his career, Morrisonn has only had one single digit point season when he played a full slate of games and that was last season. Morrisonn has the potential to score 10-15 points and only a handful of goals each season.

While this notion will seem ridiculous, another player that could be moved to clear some cap space could be Jason Pominville and his $5.3 million contract. Pominville does have a modified no-trade clause, which gives Pominville eight teams that he can’t be traded to, which could make moving him slightly difficult. Pominville was an iron man for the Sabres, playing in every game for four seasons for the Sabres until two different injuries sidelined him this season. Pominville played in a total of 73 games this past season and had 22 goals and 30 assists during the season, his lowest point total since the 2005-06 season.”

No matter which player(s) the Sabres trade, it’s important to remember that they won’t be taking much salary back. Since they’re about $3.6 million over the salary cap, even if they traded away Kotalik and Morrisonn, the Sabres would only be able to take back $1.5 million in salary. So even though a trade is better than burying contracts in the AHL, Sabres fans shouldn’t get excited about any potential returns. Think less about “difference makers” and more about prospects and draft picks.

Either way, it’s better than giving someone the Wade Redden treatment.