Tag: Sergei Makarov

Eric Lindros

Eric Lindros’ open-and-shut case for the Hockey Hall of Fame


Peter Forsberg’s election to the Hockey Hall of Fame on Monday may have helped take care of something that should’ve happened already – make Eric Lindros’ case to be enshrined in Toronto.

The two giants of the ice are forever linked because of the June 30, 1992 trade that sent Lindros’ rights from the Quebec Nordiques to the Philadelphia Flyers. The blockbuster seven-player deal saw Lindros go to the Flyers in exchange for Forsberg, Steve Duchesne, Mike Ricci, Ron Hextall, Kerry Huffman, and Philly’s 1993 first-round pick that turned into Jocelyn Thibault.

Both Lindros and Forsberg went on to have superstar careers.

Forsberg had greater team success winning the Stanley Cup in 1996 and 2001 with the Colorado Avalanche while Lindros made one Stanley Cup Final appearance in 1997 with the Flyers getting swept by the Detroit Red Wings. Forsberg won two Olympic gold medals in 1994 and 2006 with Sweden while Lindros won one in 2002 with Canada.

For Hockey Hall of Fame arguments, team titles are an easy way to distract from the point of the Hall of Fame. Getting elected to the Hall is based on individual success and, let’s face it, there are plenty of players who will never come close to making the Hall who have won multiple Stanley Cups.

When it came to individual accolades, their honors are similar. Both Forsberg (2003) and Lindros (1995) won Hart Trophies. Forsberg also won the Calder (1995) and Art Ross (2003). Both went to multiple All-Star Games and were season-end league all-stars as well.

When you look at the raw statistics and personal achievements between Lindros and Forsberg, suddenly things look a lot closer:

Forsberg:  (14 seasons – 708 GP)  249 G  636 A  885 PTS  690 PIM 1.250 PPG (points per-game)

Lindros:    (13 seasons – 760 GP)  372 G  493 A  865 PTS  1,398 PIM  1.138 PPG

Forsberg’s points per game total is eighth best all-time trailing Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux, Mike Bossy, Sidney Crosby, Bobby Orr, Marcel Dionne, and Peter Stastny. He was a no-brainer Hall of Famer whether you loved him or hated him or wanted to hold his history of foot injuries against him.

source: Getty ImagesWhile Lindros’ PPG total pales in comparison, put that into perspective of how great Forsberg’s play was. Lindros’ PPG total is 19th best all-time. The next 11 players behind Lindros on that list are all in the Hall of Fame. Of those between Forsberg and Lindros, Kent Nilsson is the only one who isn’t currently playing that’s not in the Hall (Evgeni Malkin, Alex Ovechkin, Jaromir Jagr are still going strong).

Forsberg was rightly considered a no-brainer to make the Hall of Fame yet this was Lindros’ fifth turn on the ballot. Next year’s vote won’t be any easier for Lindros to crack through.

Nicklas Lidstrom, Sergei Fedorov, and Alex Kovalev will be eligible for the first time and join a growing group of worthy candidates to be enshrined. Lidstrom will be a unanimous selection with Fedorov being arguably close to that as well.

That means Lindros will be fighting for recognition amongst other guys with gaudy numbers like Phil Housley, Alexander Mogilny, and Dave Andreychuk or those with brilliant international careers like Sergei Makarov.

There shouldn’t be a way for others, aside from Lidstrom, to make as strong of a claim to make the Hall of Fame next year as Lindros. Now with Forsberg earning his own spot in history, it’s time for the Hall of Fame committee to open the doors for “Big E.”

Nail Yakupov a throwback to the past

Nail Yakupov

By taking Nail Yakupov first overall in the 2012 NHL Draft, the Edmonton Oilers added another high-scoring forward to their stable of incredible youth. With Taylor Hall, Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, and Jordan Eberle the Oilers have a nice array of stars.

Yakupov heads to the NHL with a lot of hope and David Staples of the Edmonton Journal says the Russian reminds him of the great players of the Soviet era.

But Yakupov also shares the puck exceedingly well. The game doesn’t slow down when the puck comes to him. He doesn’t hold the puck forever, or try to deke out the entire opposing team. Instead, he quickly snaps off a fierce shot, or fires a hard pass, or he rapidly skates the puck to open ice, most often straight at the opposing net.

With his style of play and short, powerful and stocky build, his play isn’t just reminiscent of [Sergei] Makarov and [Vladimir] Krutov, he also looks like them.

If Yakupov can emulate great Russians of the past like them, the Oilers have themselves another franchise player, not to mention one that adds a bit of flavor to the roster. If you recall, Makarov won the Calder Trophy in 1990 (albeit as a 32 year-old).

Considering he’ll be either riding on the wing with Nugent-Hopkins or Sam Gagner, he’ll have the playmakers needed to fill the net.

Vladimir Krutov passes away at age 52

Vladimir Krutov - Getty Images

Russian hockey lost a legend today. Vladimir Krutov passed away at age 52 due to a stomach hemorrhage this morning.

While Krutov never really staked his claim in North America in the NHL,his legacy internationally is well known.

Krutov won two Olympic gold medals and five World Championships with the Soviet Union as a member on the legendary “KLM line.” While teamed up with Igor Larionov and Sergei Makarov, Krutov dominated international play with 164 points in 123 games. Those three players would combine with Vyacheslav Fetisov and Alexei Kasatonov to make up one of the most dynamic five-man lineups in hockey called “The Green Unit.”

Krutov played one season with the Vancouver Canucks in 1989-1990 scoring 11 goals and adding 23 assists teaming up with Larionov. While Larionov stuck with Vancouver and ultimately won Stanley Cups with Detroit, Krutov headed back to Russia the following year. Krutov was inducted to the IIHF Hall of Fame in 2010.

The PHT staff reveals their 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame choices

Joe Nieuwendyk

No one at Pro Hockey Talk has been given the honor of voting for the Hockey Hall of Fame, but with the induction announcements set for this afternoon, we decided to share the four choices we would make if we had that power. Feel free to share your own in the comments.

You can also find out who experts such as Mike Milbury and Keith Jones would pick by clicking here.

Joe Yerdon’s picks

1. Joe Nieuwendyk

2. Dave Andreychuk

3. Adam Oates

4. Doug Gilmour

With the load of sure-thing first ballot type Hall of Famers due to arrive in the coming years, this is the best chance for those who should be in the Hall of Fame to get their shot at making it in now. These four players should already be in the Hall of Fame and thanks to the foolish stipulations for how the vote has to go and the limits on the number of inductees, we’re looking at a log jam. Every one of these four have no-brainer accolades.

Joe Nieuwendyk was the perfect all-around player on numerous Stanley Cup winners. Dave Andreychuk scored 640 goals and led the Tampa Bay Lightning to a Cup. Adam Oates is the highest scoring player not in the Hall of Fame (16th all-time) and is sixth all time in assists. Doug Gilmour was a tenacious two-way player, a clutch playoff performer, and the second highest scoring player not in the Hall (17th all-time). You could nit-pick and argue about any of these guys, but they’re Hall of Famers each and every one. It’s not about arguing one guy against another as far as my ballot’s concerned, for these four it’s about getting those in who are well overdue.

James O’Brien’s picks

1. Ed Belfour – Eddie the Eagle was one of the best goalies of his generation. Belfour won two Vezina Trophies, one Stanley Cup and sits at third place all-time in wins. He also earned my personal award of “most regrettable use of a FUBU jersey.”

2. Eric Lindros – I generally value high-level impact more than impressive consistency. This isn’t the Hall of Longevity or Friendliness after all; it’s the Hall of Fame. Injuries derailed Lindros’ career but his individual numbers compare favorably to Peter Forsberg’s and he made a, well, Lindros-sized impact on the game. Put him in the “Jerks” section if you must, but he deserves to be in there.

3. Pavel BureMy old comparison still holds: Bure was the Dominique Wilkins of hockey, a human highlight reel on skates. Bure is sixth all time in goals scored per game (.62) and averaged more than a point per game but those numbers don’t do the dazzling Russian justice. Just watch his highlights.

4. Doug Gilmour – Gilmour’s 1,414 regular season points will attract a lot of voters, but I’m most impressed by his 188 points in 182 career playoff games, tying him for seventh all-time with Joe Sakic. Gilmour was also strong defensively, winning the 1992-93 Selke.

Honorable mentions: Boris Mikhailov, Sergei Makarov, Adam Oates and Joe Nieuwendyk.

Matt Reitz’s picks

1. Ed Belfour – In an era when NHL teams had to have great goaltending to be successful, he was one of the best.  He led his team to the Stanley Cup in 1999 and made it to the Finals on two other occasions.  He’s 3rd all-time in wins (484) and 9th all-time in shutouts (76).

2. Joe Nieuwendyk – The points are nice, but he was both a winner AND a leader just about everywhere he went.  He ended his career with 564 goals, a Conn Smyth Trophy, and three Stanley Cups.  The better question: Why didn’t he make it on his first ballot?

3. Adam Oates – One of the best passers in the history of the game.  Everyone assumes that Brett Hull made him look good, but I have a feeling that Hull benefited a bit from having those one-timers set on a tee from Oates.

4. Rogie Vachon – One of the best goaltenders in the 1970s, Vachon won three Cups and a Vezina with the Habs.  He’s the best goaltender in the history of the NHL who is NOT in the Hall.

Honorary mention – Doug Gilmour:  He was a gritty two-way guy who every coach would have killed for, he was a GREAT leader on the ice, AND he put up HoF type numbers.  Is there a good case AGAINST Gilmour?