Tag: season ticket sales

Nashville Predators v Columbus Blue Jackets

Blue Jackets season ticket sales are up after strong season


The Columbus Blue Jackets are already seeing good things happen thanks to their great finish this season.

While they missed out on the playoffs, according to Rusty Miller of the Associated Press, the team has seen season ticket sales jump up 13-percent from last season. Last season, the Blue Jackets had the worst record in the league and sold 7,000 season tickets and already this summer they’ve seen 1,000 new plans sold.

Seeing fans jump on board with the Jackets is a good thing as they’ve been a steady money-losing team over the last few seasons. Now with the team headed to the Eastern Conference next season and a division that will see them going head-to-head with the likes of the Rangers, Penguins, Flyers, Capitals, Islanders, Devils, and Hurricanes they’ll have to hope their winning ways this season won’t disappear against what should be stiffer competition against some of the leagues biggest stars.

If the Jackets can keep up the good feelings with realignment, those ticket sales should continue to jump up.

Hope in the desert? Phoenix Coyotes’ season ticket sales, renewals show promise

Detroit Red Wings v Phoenix Coyotes

As much as ownership situations are often plagued by misdirection, misinformation and mystery, there aren’t many that have dragged on as long as the Phoenix Coyotes fiasco. Joe accurately pegged it at four years, but when you consider the effects of the modern Internet-prompted news cycle, it feels like this story has been around for a generation.

Most of the recent news/scuttlebutt related to the Coyotes’ ownership woes hasn’t been particularly promising. Glendale Mayor Elaine Scruggs recently discussed what life would be like if the city was saddled with Jobing.com Arena but no major professional sports teams. Matt Hulsizer – far and away the franchise’s brightest hope for a possible new owner – finally got fed up with all the red tape and dropped his bid to own the Coyotes in late June, possibly focusing on buying the St. Louis Blues instead. After making the playoffs for the past two seasons, the Coyotes might have some worries on the ice as well given the departure of much-leaned-upon netminder Ilya Bryzgalov.

Despite all this negativity, the Coyotes have some reason to keep their heads held high. The cash-strapped franchise might have allowed Bryzgalov to flee, but they managed the underrated task of retaining their underrated star defenseman Keith Yandle. The best news might be at the box office, though: the Arizona Republic passes along a report that the Coyotes sold 1,000 new season ticket packages as of July 1, a boost that ranks them fifth overall in the NHL.

Naturally, there might be a few caveats to that announcement. For one thing, the top five accolade is a little misleading since many of the league’s most successful teams don’t need to sell that many extra season tickets. In addition to that asterisk, there are probably some snarky types who will say that the Coyotes’ 2010-11 sales were so close to the bottom of the barrel that 1,000 more season ticket packages isn’t as impressive as it might sound.

With those “Yeah, but … ” statements in mind, there was another promising improvement: that Arizona Republic story also reveals that the renewal rate for season tickets is at 90 percent, a Coyotes franchise record. Even if you say that 90 percent of a mediocre amount of tickets is a small victory, it’s still a promising development for a franchise that has been browbeaten by bad news for years now.

If nothing else, this development might help the team drum up some interest from a potential owner once again. The Coyotes have been a fairly successful squad the last two years, but they still haven’t won a playoff series in a long time. One can imagine them developing a solidly reinvigorated fan base if they manage more substantial playoff runs … especially if fans know that the team will still be there the following season.

Winnipeg’s team name will emerge once they sell 13,000 season tickets; Front office questions linger

NHL in Winnipeg

The Atlanta Thrashers’ relocation to Winnipeg was finally made official earlier this week, which generates a different set of questions regarding the team’s immediate future.

As we already discussed before, True North Sports and Entertainment hopes to reach a preliminary goal of selling 13,000 season tickets.* For the many people wondering what the new Winnipeg team’s name will be (you can still vote for your favorite choice here, by the way), True North provides a simple window for when they will provide an answer. CBC News reports that the team’s new name will be revealed once the new team crosses that 13,000 season tickets sold threshold.

The CBC reports that ticket holders and corporate sponsors for the True North’s AHL team the Manitoba Moose have been given the first opportunity to snatch those hot tickets. The general public will receive an opportunity to start gobbling up the rest on Saturday, so that 13,000 goal seems pretty reachable in the near future.

While we wait to see if the Winnipeg Jets will return to the NHL once more, Elliotte Friedman thinks that the franchise itself should focus on some important front office questions in the mean time. Much like the general managers they often hire, new owners often prefer to hire “their own” people. With that in mind, Friedman points out that it would be fair and logical to make those decisions soon so anyone who doesn’t make the cut would have time to find another job.

What Chipman must do now is make a quick decision on Rick Dudley, Craig Ramsay and the rest of the Thrashers’ front office/coaching staff. If he doesn’t want to keep some or all of those people, the right thing to do is release them quickly so they can find new jobs.

One of the reasons the sale took a little longer to close was that True North didn’t want to be on the hook for contracts (like Dudley’s recent extension) it didn’t take. Teams want their staffs in place by the draft. The longer the Jets/Falcons/Moose/Polar Bears take to make those choices, the less chance those individuals will have to land on their feet elsewhere. There is a lot of competition, especially when it comes to coaching.

As for True North’s own structure, Chipman made it very clear that Craig Heisinger will have “a significant role” moving forward. It’s also believed Claude Noel, who impressed both the Moose and the Canucks this year, will get the big-league coaching job. Both men have really good reputations, but Chipman will look for a more experience NHL-level executive to help them get started.

That may not be easy, because you’re going into a situation where [you don’t have] full control over who is working for you. Anyway, Vancouver has two candidates, Vice-President of Player Personnel Lorne Henning and Vice-President Hockey Operations Laurence Gilman (who is from Winnipeg). And don’t discount former Toronto GM John Ferguson, either. He has Winnipeg connections and knows Chipman well.

(That rising cackle you just heard is a chorus of Maple Leafs fans laughing at the mention of the name John Ferguson, a roundly ridiculed GM in Toronto.)

While I like a lot of what I’ve seen from GM Rick Dudley in just one season with the hockey artists formerly known as the Atlanta Thrashers, he was in the early part of a rebuild mode. Going with a different general manager (and also canning head coach Craig Ramsay, if they want to) now would be more reasonable than waiting for the first opportunity to fire him later. It might not be fair for them to lose their jobs after just one season of promising improvement, but True North has the right to put their own stamp on their new team.

Whether you hand this new Winnipeg ship the title of Jets, Moose or some other name, a winning team will ultimately drive jersey sales more than nostalgia or a great logo. We’ll keep you informed as True North begins to steer this boat in a new direction.

*At this moment in time, the “Drive to 13” Web site indicates that 4,170 season ticket packages have been sold.

Florida Panthers hit the 10,000 season ticket holder mark for first time since 2001

Image (1) LOGO_Florida_Panthers-thumb-250x243-19893.gif for post 15212

Sometimes I wonder how some teams make any money – or at least why some of them aren’t making a bigger fuss over losing a ton of it.

The Florida Panthers are one of those teams, as they haven’t made the playoffs (read: been relevant) in ages. The addition of Chicago Blackhawks GM Dale Tallon seems like it would just be a “behind the scenes” thing that wouldn’t register with most fans, but apparently the sweeping changes are capturing at least some people’s attention. The team announced that they “eclipsed” the 10,000 season ticket holder mark, a milestone the team hasn’t reached since 2001.

It’s not all good news for the Panthers at the box office, though. While the team spins it as a “more intimate seating capacity,” they decided to put a tarp over some of the nosebleed seats to fudge their attendance numbers and avoid some empty seat embarrassment.

Regardless, it’s nice to hear that Florida might be turning things around a bit. The team is probably another year or so from being a contender, but there’s finally some justification for optimism in Sunrise.