Tag: Sean Monahan

Anaheim Ducks v Calgary Flames

Gio won’t go: Flames extend Giordano for six years, $40.5M


It seemed like the Calgary Flames were going to have a big elephant in the room regarding Mark Giordano’s expiring contract next season. They removed that problem in a huge way on Tuesday.

The Flames announced a six-year contract extension for the Norris-caliber defenseman. Multiple outlets including TSN’s Bob McKenzie report that the cap hit will be $6.75 million, which would make the deal worth $40.5 million overall.

That contract will kick in beginning in 2016-17, making Giordano the highest-paid member of the Flames. He’ll make the same $6.75 million for each year of that deal, according to The Canadian Press’ Stephen Whyno.

While that’s an expensive deal out of context, that cap hit is quite the steal if Giordano remains one of the best defensemen in the NHL, which was absolutely a fair label for the veteran in 2014-15 before his season was cut short by injury.

(Really, you couldn’t hear Norris talk around awards season without “it would have been Giordano if he didn’t get hurt” …)

Here’s one additional detail about the contract, via General Fanager:

The Flames now boast a tremendous group of blueliners signed to long-term deals:

Giordano: $4.02 million in 2015-16, $6.75 million through 2021-22
Dougie Hamilton: $5.75M through 2020-21
TJ Brodie: $4.65M through 2019-20

Slight concerns amid a mostly joyous situation

Now, this does leave a few questions. Is someone like Dennis Wideman going to be the odd man out? Will this make it more difficult to re-sign the fantastic trio of Jiri Hudler (UFA), Johnny Gaudreau (RFA) and Sean Monahan (RFA) after 2015-16?

You really have to strain to see the downside for the Flames, however, as this is a bargain by expensive, high-end defensemen terms.

The genuine worry is age. Giordano is 31, he’ll turn 32 in October and will be 33 around the time his next contact kicks in.

With that “price of doing business” concern out of the way, it’s ultimately a pretty fantastic deal for the Flames.

Calgary Flames ’15-16 Outlook


For the most part, there should be optimism in Cowtown.

After a great ’14-15 campaign in which they exceeded all expectations, the Flames had themselves an equally successful summer. GM Brad Treliving struck the perfect chord of adding to his upstart team without sacrificing youth or prospects; Dougie Hamilton came aboard at the expense of three draft picks while Michael Frolik joined in free agency, much like Karri Ramo, who was brought back to recreate last year’s successful goalie tandem with Jonas Hiller.

The Flames didn’t lose much, either.

Spare veteran parts like Raphael Diaz, David Schlemko and Brian McGrattan walked in free agency, and with good reason; the postseason emergence of youngsters like Micheal Ferland, Sam Bennett and Tyler Wotherspoon made the older guys expendable.

The real excitement in Calgary, though, is the prospect of putting everything together. Up front, the dynamic trio of Johnny Gaudreau-Sean Monahan-Jiri Hudler will be back for another go-round, only this time they’ll have depth behind them: Frolik, a full season of Bennett, a full season of Mikael Backlund (remember, he missed 30 games last season) and a real wildcard in Ferland, who showed flashes of being a havoc-wreaking power forward in the playoffs.

On defense? Imagine if that all comes together too. Adding Hamilton, getting Giordano back, building off the excellent playoffs from T.J. Brodie, Dennis Wideman and Kris Russell — the Flames could have one of the better bluelines in the Western Conference.

So yes, Calgary certainly has momentum heading into ’15-16, but momentum can be a fickle thing. Especially when you’re trying to carry it from one year to the next.

What the Flames won’t have going for them is the element of surprise. It’s fair to say they snuck up on some few opponents last year, especially during their 17-8-2 start, but that’s unlikely to happen again. They’re a tough out, and the rest of the NHL now knows it. Upon being introduced to the Calgary media in July, Frolik, the former Winnipeg Jet, acknowledged part of his reason for signing in Calgary was recognizing how good the team was — and will be.

“With me and Dougie, I think that [expectations are] just going to be higher and higher,” he explained, per the Herald. “With what the guys did last year, the goal is for sure to make the playoffs.”

Calgary will also likely need to improve on its puck possession and shot-based metrics — we touched on that earlier today — but those improvements have a good chance of happening thanks to the new roster additions, and the maturation of incumbent youngsters.

Put it all together, and it’s easy to see why the organization’s already thinking about another boisterous postseason in front of the Sea of Red.

“Players want to be in a good situation, they want to have a chance to win,” Treliving said. “In the playoffs, seeing the atmosphere in the building, seeing this city come alive, seeing the support and the passion that our fans have, makes players excited.”

Flames’ biggest question: When will Giordano re-sign?

Calgary Flames v Anaheim Ducks

“Everybody in this room knows what Mark means. On the ice, we all know. He’s a culture-setter for me. We plan to get to work at it [contract extension] and have done some preliminary work at it, but it’s one we want to get wrapped up real quick this summer.”

That was Flames GM Brad Treliving on May 12, shortly after Calgary was bounced from the playoffs by Anaheim.

At the time, optimism was high. The Flames had made the playoffs for the first time in five years, won a series for the first time in 11 years, witnessed a slew of young talents playing big roles and, perhaps most impressively, did it all despite losing Giordano — their captain, leader and best player — to a season-ending biceps tear in late February.

But much has changed since May 12.

For one, there was Giordano’s initial ask. Per TSN, the 31-year-old — heading into the last of a five-year deal with a $4.02M cap hit — opened at around $9 million per year. Yes, this is how most negotiations start and yes, that number will eventually be lower. But it’s still an eye-popping figure in a vitally important negotiation.

Remember, Calgary’s already spent some fairly big coin this summer. Treliving made Dougie Hamilton the team’s highest-paid player (in terms of cap hit, anyway) with a six-year, $34.5 million deal, then made Michael Frolik the club’s highest-paid forward with a five-year, $21.5 million pact.

And looking down the road, Giordano isn’t the only big contract in Treliving’s future. Sean Monahan, coming off a terrific 31-goal campaign, and Calder finalist Johnny Gaudreau will also need new deals after this season.

The good news for Calgary is there’s no cap crunch standing in the way of things. The Giordano extension will get done, but it’s easy to see why it hasn’t happened yet.

Let’s assume that, when the contract is signed, Giordano will surpass Hamilton as the team’s biggest earner. It would be bizarre for any Flame, let alone a d-man, to be paid more, especially since Giordano was considered to be a Norris Trophy frontrunner at the time of his injury; he still managed to finish 13th among NHL blueliners in scoring last year, with 48 points, despite missing 21 games.

So there’s that to figure out.

There’s also how much term the Flames want to give. For as good as he was last year, Giordano will be 32 by the time next season opens and is coming off a major injury, marking the third time in the last four seasons that’s happened — a torn hamstring cost him major time in ’11-12, and a broken ankle sidelined him for weeks in ’13-14.

Finally, there’s the timing. It stands to reason both Calgary and Giordano want the extension done before the season starts, to avoid the distraction it may cause when games start to matter.

At last check — in early July — Treliving said the negotiation was underway, after getting sidetracked by the Hamilton trade and free agency.

“Mark’s our captain and our leader, and we’re gonna work away at getting that done,” he said, per the Calgary Sun. “No update on the talks with Mark, other than it remains a priority for us to continue and work away at and get to a good conclusion.”