Tag: Scouting Combine


Breathe easy: McDavid, Eichel can do pull-ups


Connor McDavid and Jack Eichel seem virtually assured to go No. 1 and No. 2 respectively in the 2015 NHL Draft, yet both showed up for the 2015 Scouting Combine anyway. And they both seemed to generate great impressions.

With immense apologies to Sam Bennett, each prospect fared well in the clearly all-important pull-up category. NHL.com passes along word that Eichel enjoyed a better overall showing, shown most simply by this tale of the tape:


Hey, at least they’re both good athletes, right? /Wipes sweat from brow.

Speaking of wiping away sweat, the combine generally provides a few candid/funny photos of prospects. Here are a few shots of McDavid and Eichel that may serve your meme needs.

Connor McDavid
Connor McDavidAP Photo/Gary Wiepert

Some might say that’s reminiscent of the face McDavid made when it was clear the Oilers received the first overall pick …

source: Getty Images
McDavid via Getty

Then again, maybe that is the face …

2015 NHL Combine
Jack Eichel
Bill Wippert/NHLI via Getty Images
Jack Eichel
Jack EichelAP Photo/Gary Wiepert

Really, the most important question is: which prospect made the funniest faces?

Adam Larsson, Gabriel Landeskog produce solid showings at 2011 Draft Combine

Gabriel Landeskog

In some draft years, the No.1 pick is painfully obvious. With all due respect to the exceptional scoring skills of second overall pick Bobby Ryan, the 2005 NHL Draft Lottery was all about landing Sidney Crosby. In other years, hockey writers occasionally receive the tantalizing opportunity to play their own version of the Kevin Duran-Greg Oden debate, like what we saw before the last two drafts (Taylor Hall vs. Tyler Seguin in 2010; John Tavares vs. Victor Hedman in ’09).

The 2011 version’s race for the No. 1 spot seems much more crowded, though. Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, Adam Larsson and Gabriel Landeskog could be the top pick in the draft, if you ask many experts. (Heck, some even say that Jonathan Huberdeau might sneak up the list a bit as well after his strong performance in the 2011 Memorial Cup tournament.)

A slight majority seem to peg Nugent-Hopkins as the odds-on favorite, but Mike Morreale reports that strong 2011 Draft Combine workouts could keep defenseman Larsson and forward Landeskog in the No. 1 pick discussion.

“It is probably more important for fans than I think it is for the players,” Landeskog said of being picked No. 1. “It would be an honor for anybody to go first overall, but like Cam Fowler (Anaheim, No. 12) and Jeff Skinner (Carolina, No. 7) showed last year, it doesn’t matter what number you go, it’s what you do afterwards.”

Landeskog never appeared fatigued or bothered by any of the tests on Friday at the Toronto Congress Centre. He produced 33 push-ups, well above last year’s average (26.1). He also bench-pressed 150 pounds 11 times, besting last year’s 10.7 average.


“Larsson played a big role on Skelleftea, which went as high as to the Swedish playoff Finals, so in a way, he’s ready, yes. He could play here (in 2011-12),” Director of European Scouting Goran Stubb told NHL.com. “I think what he wants really is having a big role when he comes over, so it’s perhaps better for him to stay one more year at home. It’s always in the individual. Some say it’s good to come over, others say it’s not good.”

Larsson scored exceptionally well in the grueling aerobic-max VO2 bike test, which measures the endurance capability of a player’s heart, lungs and muscles. He lasted 14 minutes, far ahead of last year’s average of 11.33.

Of course, it’s easy for scouts to fall into the same trap that NFL ones do with 40-yard dash times, ignoring flaws and needs for pure athleticism. After all, hockey is a sport in which on-ice IQ is often just as important as speed or strength.

That being said, the post-lockout game does require more athleticism than the days of clutching and grabbing more skilled skaters. Here is a look at the leaders in a few of the more hockey-relevant tests from the combine, via NHL.com.

Peak power output — The Wingate Cycle Ergometer — also known as the bane of prospects’ existence — measures how hard a player can go in a 30-second shift. Portland Winterhawks forward Ty Rattie and Shawinigan Cataractes defenseman Jonathan Racine led the way at 15.9 watts of energy per kilogram of body weight.

VO2 Max test duration — The players who stuck with it the longest were a pair of defensemen, Skelleftea’s Adam Larson and the Vancouver Giants’ David Musil, each at 14 minutes. Next were Niagara IceDogs defenseman Dougie Hamilton and Saginaw Spirit forward Brandon Saad.


Bench press — [Adam] Clendening, [Mark] McNeill and Saint John Sea Dogs forward Tomas Jurco each did 13 reps with the 150-pound weight on the bench. Omaha Lancers forward Seth Ambroz and Northeastern defenseman Jamie Oleksiak were next with 12.


Push/pull strength — The hardest player to clear from the front of the net might be McNeill, who had 32 goals in 72 WHL games this season. His 366 pounds of push strength was far ahead of Oleksiak, who was next at 312. McNeill’s pull strength of 306 pounds was second only to U.S. National Team forward Tyler Biggs, who totaled 323 pounds.

Stay tuned for more 2011 NHL Entry Draft coverage as June 24 approaches.

E.J. McGuire is missed as NHL Combine starts today


The NHL Combine officially kicked off today as the players started the week long interview process with all 30 teams at the Westin Bristol Place in Toronto. After a few days of being asked hard questions, seemingly mundane questions, psychological questions and repetitive questions, they’ll finally get to show what they can do physically on Friday and Saturday as they go through medical and physical testing on Friday and Saturday. The structure of the Combine is no different than it was last year, but the spirit couldn’t have changed anymore if they tried.

The central figure of the combine, former Director of NHL’s Central Scouting, E.J. McGuire won’t be greeting players, scouts, and media members this year as he passed away from Leiomyosarcoma on April 7th at the age of 58. But even though he won’t physically be at this year’s combine, his spirit is at the forefront of many attendees’ minds.

Two members of Central Scouting shared their thoughts with Mike G. Morreale at NHL.com:

Central Scouting manager Nathan Ogilvie-Harris:
“We want to honor E.J. by making this a great event this year. This was his centerpiece. He helped grow the Combine from the days of starting out in a hotel basement (at the then-Park Plaza Hotel) in a small room with not much media exposure, to where we are today where we’re spread out and holding the physical testing in a more conducive setting (Toronto Congress Center).”

NHL Central Scouting videographer and scout David Gregory:
“He looked at it as an opportunity to make sure people understood everything that the NHL was about and certainly what our department was about. The Combine was a great opportunity to talk to a lot of media, a lot of teams, and people that you usually don’t get to see too often during the year. He had so much passion for what he did and what he believed in. E.J. took the opportunity to solidify all the relationships with vendors and those who worked the Combine. He would set up shop at the hotel and talk and meet with anybody. That was one of the amazing things about E.J.; he made everyone that wanted to talk to him feel like the most important person in the building.”

With the explosion of interest and accessibility with the internet, hockey fans are paying attention to prospects like never before. In the middle of the boom was EJ McGuire—sharing his knowledge with anyone who showed a remote interest (and sometimes even with those who didn’t). His passion shone through with every interview, as he’d talk about the players who were expected to excel, as well as the borderline prospects with the same enthusiasm. His eagerness to share his knowledge spread to all types of fans all over North America—from the casual fan who wanted to know who his team could select, to the super fan who wanted to know everything there was to know about the hidden gems.

Make no mistake that McGuire and his staff were some of the hardest working people associated with the sport 365 days per year; but the NHL Combine and Draft were his Super Bowl and World Series. Since his passing last month, people in the hockey world knew the Scouting Combine was going to be tough without McGuire. But while the show must go on, it’s great to hear he’s still one of the driving forces to make sure the event is a rousing success.