Tag: Scott Stevens

Ray Shero

Report: Devils looking to Penguins for assistant coaches


On Tuesday the New Jersey Devils officially announced former AHL Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins coach John Hynes as the club’s new bench boss.

Now they’re reportedly looking back into the Penguins system for assistant coaches to fill out Hynes’ staff.

According to Tom Gulitti of The Record, the Devils have asked permission to speak with Wilkes-Barre/Scranton assistant coach Alain Nasreddine.

The Devils gave Pittsburgh a 2016 third-round pick as compensation for Hynes, but would not be forced to send another pick to the Penguins if they hire Nasreddine.

Nasreddine, who appeared in 74 career NHL games with Chicago, Montreal, the New York Islanders and Pittsburgh during his playing days, has worked with Hynes for the past five seasons in Wilkes-Barre/Scranton.

After spending the 2009-10 season playing professionally overseas, the 39-year-old was hired by current Devils GM Ray Shero to join Hynes’ staff in the AHL.

Gulitti reports that Shero will also interview former Devils’ captain Scott Stevens about a possible assistant coaching job.

Devils raise Scott Niedermayer’s No. 27 to rafters

Scott Niedermayer Jersey Retirement Press Conference

Scott Niedermayer doesn’t have Martin Brodeur’s all-time records. He didn’t provide a highlight reel’s worth of bone-crushing hits like Scott Stevens. Instead, the silky-smooth defenseman made a mark on the NHL because of his speed, defensive acumen and all-around ability. He also happened to be a classy guy. For those reasons and more, the New Jersey Devils hoisted his No. 27 to the rafters tonight. Watch the banner-raising ceremony in the video below.

This story includes highlights from Niedermayer’s speech, including this quote.

“It was an honor and a privilege to be a New Jersey Devil,” Niedermayer said. “These memories, I will cherish the rest of my life.”

Devils to retire Scott Niedermayer’s “27” on December 16 vs. Dallas

Scott Niedermayer

It’s an honor that’s been rumored for some time now, but Scott Niedermayer will officially get his due from the New Jersey Devils having his number retired.

Niedermayer’s no. 27 will be lifted to the rafters at Prudential Center in Newark on December 16 against the Dallas Stars. Niedermayer will join former defensemen Ken Daneyko and Scott Stevens as those honored by having their number retired by the team and proving that the Devils of the 90s and 2000s were all about being tough along the blue line.

Fire & Ice’s Tom Gulitti has the word from Devils GM Lou Lamoriello as to what Niedermayer meant to the organization and why he’s being honored by the team.

“Scott Niedermayer’s talent and leadership played significant roles in each of our three Stanley Cup Championships,” Devils general manager Lou Lamoriello said in a statement released by the team. “We look forward to welcoming the Niedermayer family back to New Jersey as we retire Scott’s no. 27.”

Niedermayer’s career started with the Devils as part of one of the more inauspicious deals in NHL history. While the Devils selected Niedermayer third in the NHL draft in 1991, it was a pick the Devils acquired from Toronto in exchange for Tom Kurvers in 1989. The Leafs’ blunder turned into New Jersey’s ultimate gain as Niedermayer went on to have a, likely, Hall Of Fame career in New Jersey and Anaheim while Kurvers lasted just 89 games in Toronto before being shipped off to Vancouver for Brian Bradley late in 1991.

Niedermayer went on to win four Stanley Cups in his career, three with New Jersey and one in Anaheim but his career in New Jersey is what made him a legend in NHL circles including a Norris Trophy in 2003-2004. Niedermayer won the Conn Smythe with Anaheim in 2007.  It’s an honor for the former Devil that comes a bit overdue since his retirement in last June.

Some Devils fans didn’t like how Niedermayer left the organization signing as a free agent with the Ducks after the lockout ended in 2005, but anyone thinking the Devils would’ve been as successful without his play is out of their mind. Niedermayer is one of the best the team and the league has seen over the years.

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: New Jersey Devils

Ilya Kovalchuk

The Devils haven’t always been the entertaining team on the ice, but they’ve been winners. That sort of attitude applies to their sweaters over the years, as they haven’t always been entertaining or controversial but they’ve always been great. From guys like Pat Verbeek and Chris Terreri to Scott Stevens, Scott Niedermayer, Martin Brodeur, and Ilya Kovalchuk they’ve had the names but the same look on the ice. But what about those sweaters?

Best: Well, there’s not a lot of room for error here when examining the Devils’ sweaters of the past. They’ve had two different types of sweaters and, depending on your preference in colors that determines which way things fall here. Given that I’m just north of 30 years-old and spent my formative years watching hockey in the 80s and early 90s… I’m a big fan of the “Christmas” color jerseys the team adopted from the moment they arrived in New Jersey in 1982 that lasted until black replaced green in 1992.

Worst: The Devils haven’t done anything egregious at all in their history and I’m not about to call anything they’ve done to be the “worst” of anything. Some of you might take issue with the old days wearing green and red, but those sweaters still looked nice. Switching to black, while predictable in the early 90’s, made a ton of sense considering they’re named the Devils. After all, what colors do you see devils wearing in artistic representations most often? Yup.

Old-timey favorite: The Devils weren’t always in New Jersey. They were born originally in Kansas City as the Scouts and moved to Denver to become the Rockies. Of those previous iterations, the Kansas City Scouts sweater from 1974 is iconic for its wild striping, funky colors, and logo that paid homage to a Kansas City landmark and history as a western outpost.

Assessment: The Devils are about as boring with their sweaters as they were back in the mid-90s under Jacques Lemaire and the neutral zone trap.  The difference here is that people reflect upon the Devils sweaters and its interlocking “NJ” with love and admiration. After all, it was featured prominently in the film “Clerks” and if you don’t love “Clerks” you’re either not a child of the 90s or Kevin Smith himself. The Devils have avoided the third jersey plague and they’ve even brought back the green and red jerseys once a year for St. Patrick’s Day. What’s not to appreciate about that?

Chara, Ovechkin and Phaneuf make list of 10 ‘biggest hitters’


For better or worse, hitting is a part of hockey. Even as we learn more about the dangers and effects of concussions, it would be wrong to remove that element from the sport altogether. Maybe it’s twisted to celebrate hard hits in medleys and highlight reels, but they play a legitimate role in how the game is played.

Every now and then, a fearsome hitter can change the very flow of a contest. The advantages are most obvious for defensemen whose fearsome checks render courageous forwards into wallflowers. The benefits don’t stop at the defensive end, though; a big hitter can turn a mundane forecheck into a turnover waiting to happen and that extra level of intimidation can open up room for more finesse-driven linemates.

Much like a bruising NFL running back, big-hitters sometimes take almost as much abuse as they give. That’s one of the most interesting things about NHL.com’s list of the 10 biggest hitters. Eric Lindros, Cam Neely and Scott Stevens (the top guy on the list) probably shortened the careers of other players with their willingness to use their big bodies, but injuries forced them into retirement as well. Stevens is the only one of those three who could probably say that his career didn’t end with many “What if” scenarios because of those injuries, but there might be days when he rues that rugged style.

Other older/retired players included on the list were Lindros nemesis Darius Kasparaitis, New York Islanders great Denis Potvin and and hip-check machine Leo Boivin.

The most interesting part of the list might be the modern members, though. Here are the active NHLers who made the list, with their ranking and a comment and/or video.

9. Cal Clutterbuck

As John Kreiser points out, Clutterbuck set an NHL record for hits in a season with 356 in 2008-09. Maybe he’s more about quantity than delivering astounding checks, although he has his fair share of hard ones as well.

7. Zdeno Chara

Of course, many will think of the infamous check on Max Pacioretty, but Chara is feared for a reason: his size. He doesn’t have a reputation for taking liberties with opponents, for the most part, though. His inclusion on this list is fine, but I couldn’t help but ask: where’s Chris Pronger? Pronger isn’t much smaller than Chara and he makes up for that size difference by showing no mercy to opponents.

6. Alex Ovechkin

Ovechkin is most known for his free-wheeling attitude and high-scoring ways, but he’s the human embodiment of what a perfect video game athlete would be because he also throws his body around with reckless abandon. One cannot help but wonder if this style will come back to haunt him when he gets older like it did for Neely and Lindros, but his willingness to get physical is part of what makes him so beloved among hockey fans. (Except if he’s delivering a hit – sometimes a controversial one – on one of your favorite players.)

2. Dion Phaneuf

At some point, it seemed like Phaneuf would be the next Scott Stevens or Chris Pronger. Right now, that seems to be true more in his salary than his on-ice results, as he’s been exposed with tougher defensive assignments. Word out of Toronto is that he’s getting it back together, though, which might mean that the fake verb “Phaneuf’d” won’t be used sarcastically much longer.

Even if his stature in the league suffered, Phaneuf makes vulnerable forwards suffer from some savage hits. I’ll always think of his brutal hit on Kyle Okposo in the 2009 preseason, but NHL.com provides another example.

Holy Mackinaw indeed.


So what do you think of the list? Is Stevens the biggest hitter ever? Should Phaneuf be ranked so high? Are there any fearsome hitters who should have made the top 10? Let us know in the comments.