Tag: Samuel Pahlsson

Samuel Pahlsson

Samuel Pahlsson leaves NHL, signs deal in Sweden


The Vancouver Canucks, nor the NHL, won’t have Samuel Pahlsson to kick around next season.

The longtime NHL veteran is headed home to play in Sweden after signing a contract with his former team in the Swedish Elite League (link in Swedish), MODO.

Pahlsson was a deadline acquisition for the Canucks in a deal with Columbus. Pahlsson had spent the previous two-and-a-half seasons with the Jackets before going to Vancouver. Before that, he was a Stanley Cup winner in 2007 with Anaheim and also spent time briefly with Chicago and Boston. Now after 11 seasons he’s returning to Sweden where he says he’s happy to be back home.

Pahlsson’s defensive play up front and ability to win faceoffs will be missed in the NHL, although not apparently too much by Canucks fans.

PHT List: Rating this year’s trade deadline acquisitions

Antoine Vermette

With just five teams left in the Stanley Cup playoffs — and if New York does the business tonight, that number will drop to four — now’s a good time to look back at the flurry of action on (and leading up to) February’s NHL trade deadline.

Which deals paid off most handsomely? Which didn’t?

The Good

To Phoenix: C Antoine Vermette
To Columbus: 2012 2nd-round pick, 2013 5th-round pick, G Curtis McElhinney (link)

Vermette leads Phoenix in playoff scoring (5G-4A-9PTS — 11th overall) and the Coyotes are in their first ever conference final. This one’s a no-brainer, probably the best deal made.

To Los Angeles: C Jeff Carter
To Columbus: D Jack Johnson, Cond. 1st-round pick (link)

Carter’s numbers hardly jump off the page (1G-3A-4PTS) but Los Angeles’ numbers since acquiring him sure do. Including the playoffs, the Kings are 21-6-3 since the Feb. 23 trade. Oh yeah, they’re also going to their first Western Conference finals since 1993.

To New Jersey: D Marek Zidlicky
To Minnesota: D Kurtis Foster, RW Nick Palmieri, LW Stephane Veilleux, 2012 2nd-round pick, Cond. 2013 3rd-round pick (link)

The Devils gave up plenty to land Zidlicky but, like Carter, you can’t argue with the numbers. New Jersey’s 21-11-2 since getting him; Zidlicky leads all Devils in postseason ice-time (24:39) and has six points in 12 games thus far.

To Philadelphia: D Nicklas Grossmann
To Dallas: 2012 2nd-round pick (link)

The Flyers really liked Grossmann and inked him to a four-year, $14 million deal. His postseason was abbreviated by a concussion but overall, he was solid on the Flyers blueline.

The Average

To Boston: RW Brian Rolston, D Mike Mottau
To New York Islanders: RW Yannick Riendeau, D Marc Cantin (link)

Rolston put up 15 points in 21 regular season games and started the postseason well, scoring a point in each of the first three games. He faded at the end, probably because he’s 39 years old, but considering they gave up nothing to get him and Mottau, the Bruins did okay.

To Chicago: D Johnny Oduya
To Winnipeg: 2013 2nd- and 3rd-round picks (link)

Chicago liked him and he played well, but Oduya didn’t change the ‘Hawks’ fortunes any. They were bounced in the opening round again, and now he’s a UFA that Chicago might not be able to retain.

The Bad

To Philadelphia: D Pavel Kubina
To Tampa Bay: LW Jon Kalinski, 2013 2nd-round pick, Cond. 2013 4th-round pick (link)

The Flyers realized Kubina was too slow to play regularly. He ended up a frequent healthy scratch.

To Detroit: D Kyle Quincey
To Tampa Bay: 2012 1st-round pick, D Sebastien Piche (link)

Quincey’s minutes decreased to the point where he was barely playing 16 per game in the first round. Detroit’s early exit also means the Lightning now get a pretty decent pick.

To Nashville: C Paul Gaustad, 2012 4th-round pick
To Buffalo: 2012 1st-round pick (link)

David Poile — recently named one of the three GM of the year finalists — dealt away a first-rounder for a guy that was often Nashville’s fourth-line center. In the Phoenix series, Gaustad averaged 10:33 per game.

To San Jose: C Dominic Moore, 2012 7th-round pick
To Tampa Bay: 2012 2nd-round pick (link)

To San Jose: C Daniel Winnik, C T.J. Galiardi, 2012 7th-round pick
To Colorado: LW Jamie McGinn (link)

Lumping these in together. Winnik, Galiardi and Moore combined for a measly 12 points in the regular season and one in the playoffs (Galiardi and Moore only dressed for three of the five games.)

Trade we can’t really evaluate yet

To Vancouver: RW Zack Kassian
To Buffalo: C Cody Hodgson (link)

Since this trade wasn’t a prototypical deadline deal — it’s safe to say Vancouver made this one with an eye on the future — it can’t be graded. If you did want to grade it as a trade deadline deal, though, it would be classified as “bad, very very bad” for Vancouver.

The Canucks shipped out an offensively talented player (then proceeded to score eight goals in five games against the Kings) in exchange for Kassian, who was supposed to bring physicality but ended up only playing four of five playoff games (4:51 of ice per) and recording exactly five hits.

Other trades I don’t feel especially compelled to analyze, but feel free to debate them thoroughly in the comments section

To Nashville: RW Andrei Kostitsyn
To Montreal: 2013 2nd-round pick, Cond. 2013 5th-round pick (link)

To Nashville: D Hal Gill, 2013 5th-round pick
To Montreal: C Blake Geoffrion, LW Robert Slaney, 2012 2nd-round pick (link)

To Florida: LW Wojtek Wolski
To New York Rangers: D Mike Vernace, 2013 3rd-round pick (link)

To Vancouver: C Samuel Pahlsson
To Columbus: D Taylor Ellinlgton, Two 2012 4th-round picks (link)

To Ottawa: G Ben Bishop
To St. Louis: 2013 2nd-round pick (link)

Columnist: If Canucks can’t come back, fire Vigneault

Vancouver Canucks v Boston Bruins - Game Six

Given the pitchforks are already out in Vancouver, no surprise scalpels are being brandished now too.

With the top-seeded Canucks down 3-0 in their opening-round series to No. 8 Los Angeles, the Vancouver media has already begun looking past the idea of a comeback (and hey, fair enough — teams up 3-0 go on to win 98 percent of the time).

Instead, they’ve started conducting the autopsy.

There have been healthy debates about personnel decisions, trade ideas, who should be the starting netminder and today, Tony Gallagher of the Vancouver Province added another topic to the list:

Who the next head coach should be.

Because of his long tenure enjoyed as head coach of the Vancouver Canucks, it might be a useful exercise to mount something of a defence for Alain Vigneault after another season whereby it looks all but certain his team is going to come to another crashing, miserable end in the NHL playoffs.

Granted this agent may not be the most qualified for this, but those who worship the ground the man spits on will doubtless come out of their boots trying to keep him around because he’s an easy man with which to work…

…“I’ve been on teams where the coach has been fired a couple of times but it’s not decisions we make,” said Samuel Pahlsson, who was on hand when Scott Arniel was fired by Columbus in January this season. “We didn’t think it was the coach’s fault there.

When asked about here in Vancouver should the team lose this series he thought for at least two seconds and finally said: “It’s the same here.”

Players at this level always take the blame, publicly at least. Barring a recovery of historic proportions in this series however, it says here this group, however comprised next year, deserves to hear a different voice.

Some notes:

— Vigneault’s the most decorated (and arguably best) coach in Canucks franchise history, though his chief competition is Pat Quinn, Marc Crawford and two seasons of Roger Neilson. AV won a Jack Adams, was nominated for another, captured the club’s first-ever Presidents’ Trophies and got to Game 7 of the Stanley Cup final. Very healthy resume.

— There’s heavy speculation that Vigneault’s in the “fired at sunset, hired by sunrise” category of NHL head coaches. Ergo, if Vancouver cuts him loose there’s a good chance he ends up behind a bench at the start of next season (and given his ability to speak French, you can see where this is going…)

— To put Gallagher’s work in context, he wrote this in March after the Canucks went 5-6-2 over a 13-game stretch. The team then proceeded to win eight of its next 10 and finish first overall in the NHL.

Canucks win second consecutive Presidents’ Trophy

Roberto Luongo

It took a bit of luck but, for the second straight year, Vancouver will enter the playoffs as the NHL’s top seed.

The Canucks beat Edmonton 3-0 on Saturday to capture the 2012 Presidents’ Trophy — though they did get some help along the way. A series of fortunate results (St. Louis’ 4-1 loss to Phoenix on Friday night, the Rangers’ 4-1 home defeat to Washington on Saturday) gave Vancouver control of its own fate heading into the Oilers game.

And to their credit, the Canucks took full advantage.

Henrik Sedin scored what would prove to be the game-winner midway through the second, his 14th goal of the year, before Samuel Pahlsson and David Booth added insurance markers in the third. Roberto Luongo stopped all 17 shots he faced for his fifth shutout of the year — his highest shutout total since 2008-09 — and barely broke a sweat in a game Vancouver dominated. The Canucks out-shot the Oilers by 25 on the night, including a 12-shot dispartiy (17 to five) in the opening frame.

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Some notes about the Presidents’ Trophy win:

— Vancouver becomes the first team to win back-to-back Presidents’ Trophies since Dallas did it in 1997-98 and 1998-99. (Note: Detroit won in 2003-04 and 2005-06, missing the year between due of the lockout.)

— Since the NHL began handing out the Presidents’ Trophy in 1985-86, only seven teams have gone on to win the Stanley Cup: Edmonton (1986-87), Calgary (1988-89), New York Rangers (1993-94), Dallas (1998-99), Colorado (2000-01), Detroit (2001-02) and Detroit again (2007-08).

— Last year, the Canucks became the first team to win the Presidents’ Trophy and lose in the Stanley Cup finals since the 1995 Red Wings.

They’re starting to panic about the Sedins in Vancouver


With one combined point in their last six games, the Sedins have become the main topic of concern in Vancouver, where the Canucks have dropped back-to-back games in regulation for the first time since October.

Last night, it was a 5-2 loss to the Dallas Stars, leading The Province’s Tony Gallagher to write:

The twins are working hard enough, you can see that. But the magic has taken its leave and has been replaced by crippling frustration. They seem far apart from each other on the ice. There’s not the same sense of positioning with respect to the other guy.

And the question has to be when, or more troubling if, that magic is coming back. Throw in the hilarious performance from Alex Edler in this one – most of the humour coming on his fluke goal – and you have to say Samuel Pahlsson was the best Swede on the ice for Vancouver, and when that’s the case, they’re toast.

Theories abound as to why Henrik and Daniel are struggling:

—- They’re exhausted. The twins have played a ton of hockey over the last year, and they didn’t get the All-Star break off either.

—- Clutching and grabbing is back in the NHL, and that’s hindering their ability to operate.

—- Combine the declining number of penalties being called and the opposition knowing it has to stay out of the box against Vancouver, and they’re not getting as many opportunities on the power play.

—- The book is out, and it reads: Instead of giving them time and space, give them a crosscheck in the back.

If there’s reason for optimism as the playoffs approach, it’s Vancouver’s schedule. The Canucks are at home until March 19, and they only play four games between now and then. If the twins are tired, that should help.