Tag: sale

2011 NHL Entry Draft - Round One

Nieuwendyk says ownership issues aren’t affecting the Stars

The Stars will have plenty of adversity to face this season. They’ll look to replace their leading scorer and top-line center. They’ll look to rebound from a season that saw them waste a playoff opportunity on the final day of the season. And they’ll look to do it all while breaking in a brand new coach. All the sudden, the naysayers and doomsday predictors look like they may have a point. It looks like it could be an uphill battle for the boys from Big D.

But one thing that won’t hamper the Stars is their precarious ownership situation. It’s no secret that Tom Gaglardi has every intention of purchasing the Stars as soon as he can get approval from the courts and the debtors that are owned money in the bankruptcy case. All parties involve assume the sale will be settled sometime during the first half of the NHL season—in ownership time, that’s not bad at all. Just ask the Phoenix Coyotes. But until then, there was some concern that GM Joe Nieuwendyk and the Dallas Stars front-office would not be unable to make the moves they wanted to because of the delicate ownership situation. The fear was that the team wouldn’t acquire any additional payroll before the sale was completed and a new owner was in place.

Joe Nieuwendyk is here to ease all fears. GM Nieuwendyk told Fan 960 in Calgary that the drawn-out sale process hasn’t affected the Stars and what they’ve wanted to do this offseason (via ESPN Dallas):

“…Obviously we’re going through this sale process and it is taking probably longer than any of us had anticipated. It is moving. I know that speaking with the league this thing will get resolved this season, prior to Christmas. It’s just been a long process. The good thing is it hasn’t taken away from anything what our team has been able to do. We increased our budget and went after players that could fill roles on our team and help us. We added seven players this summer and I feel really good about our team. We’ve been able to keep our off-ice issues away from the locker room and I think the guys are excited about the upcoming season.”

There’s a difference between a team having their hands tied and being fiscally responsible. No team with an internal budget was going to be able to afford Brad Richards and his contract demands. Not only was it an exorbitant price tag for one player, but it also would have limited the resources for management to piece together a competitive 23-man roster. The Stars weren’t the only team that was out of the Brad Richards sweepstakes before July 1.

Just because the Stars failed to re-sign Richards doesn’t mean that they sat on the sidelines and watched as other teams snatched up free agents. All in all, the Stars acquired six new players to improve the team’s overall depth. None of the newcomers are going to make fans forget about Brad Richards, but they should help the Stars roll four lines for the first time in years. Michael Ryder, Vernon Fiddler, Sheldon Souray, Radek Dvorak, Adam Pardy, and Jake Dowell all were acquired by the Stars to help transform the Stars into the two-way team that new head coach Glen Gulutzen envisions next season.

The bad news is that even though the Stars increased their payroll this season, they still have the 25th ranked payroll in the NHL (they’ll most likely be 26th after Winnipeg re-signs Zach Bogosian). While there are contenders pressed firmly up against the salary cap, the Stars have a full roster and they’re still $14.4 million under the limit. Each team in the competitive Pacific Division has a more expensive payroll—even the budget conscious Anaheim Ducks and Phoenix Coyotes. Again, it will be an uphill battle this season.

GM Joe Nieuwendyk may say that he’s been free to conduct business as usual—but fans in Dallas have to hope the budget will increase once the new owner is in place.

Mark Cuban continues to stick around the Dallas Stars ownership situation


When Tom Hicks announced that he was looking for potential buyers for the Dallas Stars, one of the first names to be speculated was Mavericks owner Mark Cuban. He had money, shared the building with the Stars, and always came off in public interviews as a complete sports fan. As far as initial names go, it seemed within the scope of feasibility. A year later and his name is still being bounced around the rumor mill to purchase the Stars—but he’s still not about to buy the entire team from the Hicks Sports Group.

Possibly the most important reason why he’ll continue to be in the rumors is that he wants to own the beautiful downtown Dallas American Airlines Center. Back when the AAC was built in 2001, the Stars and Mavericks funded 50% of the arena with public funding covering the other 50%. Accordingly, both the Mavericks and Stars own the lease on the arena—Cuban shares ownership with the Hicks Sports Group.

It’s the lease more than the hockey franchise that has Cuban even mildly interested. Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News caught up with Cuban and asked him where he stood with the Dallas Stars and their impending sale.

“Nothing’s changed,” Cuban said before Friday’s game. “I’ll help anybody who gives me a better shot at the rest of the arena.”

Asked if he would do it himself, he said he would not.

“I’m going to let someone else do the work,” he said.

For the record, Cuban has stood firm on his stance. There was a report a few weeks ago that Allen Americans owner Douglas Miller was interested in buying the Dallas Stars and Cuban said he’d only be interested in playing a small role in the purchase when the Hicks Sports Group announced they were looking for a new owner. Thirteen months later he’s sticking to the same story. Whether he likes it or not, his name is going to continue to keep coming up in the discussions until the Stars are finally sold and the ink is dry on a contract. Until then, people will keep connecting the dots between his big personality, large bank account, and interest in owning the Mavericks’ home.

As always, we’ll update as details become available.

Checketts announces the Blues are for sale

Keith Tkachuk, Dave Checketts

If you have a couple hundred million dollars lying around and are interested in buying an NHL team, you’re in luck. It’s turning into a buyer’s market. We all know the Phoenix Coyotes have been trying to complete a sale for almost two years, the Atlanta Thrashers are actively seeking buyers, Tom Hicks is looking to sell the Dallas Stars, the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan is looking for someone to buy their 66% ownership in the Maple Leafs, and now, the St. Louis Blues are on the market as well.

Blues President Dave Checketts, who owns 20% of the franchise, has been working to find investors for 70% of the franchise that is owned by TowerBrook Capital Partners. They’ve wanted out for about a year, but unfortunately Checketts has been unable to find any potential owners to fill the void. Now, instead of finding investors for 70% of the team (and Scottrade Center lease), he’s turning his focus to selling off his 20% as well.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has Checketts’ thoughts:

“Until it ends, until we find a ‘Mr. Wonderful’ to come along, somebody that can take this over and push it along, I’m going to continue to push this franchise to be the best,” Checketts said. “I’m going to keep on everybody and keep pushing to make the team better and come back strong. I feel good about where we’re headed.”


“I’m very proud of what we accomplished here,” Checketts said. “The Scottrade Center is filled for every game. Blues fans love their team. We have some terrific young players in place. We have an outstanding management team to take the franchise into the future.

“I don’t like being a 12-place team. But better days are ahead.

“But I can no longer be a buyer. For I have to tell the world ‘Folks, it’s for sale.’ And they ought to come in and look at it, because it is a respectable and healthy NHL team and in a great city. What I want to do now, what I have to do, is to make sure to find someone with the same passion and commitment that I do.”

That means there are currently five NHL teams out there looking for “Mr. Wonderful.” But before fans in Saskatoon or Quebec City start saving for Blues season tickets, this situation is different than the Atlanta and Phoenix situations. The Blues have deeper roots in the community—both with sponsors and with their fan base. As Checketts said, the team has sold out every game this season and by all accounts is a healthy franchise with decades of tradition.

As it stands today, yet another team is for sale. And this time, it’s being sold by an owner who really doesn’t want to sell. At least that part of the story is different.