Tag: salary arbitration


Report: Wild’s Haula files for arbitration


Minnesota Wild forward Erik Haula filed for salary arbitration on Sunday, according to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune’s Michael Russo.

In case you’re not seasoned in this phase of the offseason, here’s a reminder: the Wild and Haula could reach an agreement before a hearing takes place. In fact, it’s not that uncommon for agreements to take place mere hours before scheduled discussions.

(As you may also know, it’s generally preferred to avoid the sometimes-arduous, bridge-burning elements of arbitration, too.)

Haula’s earning power is tough to gauge. Here’s how his expiring contract broke down in both 2013-14 and 2014-15: $900K salary at the NHL level, $67,500 in the AHL, $850K performance bonus and $90K signing bonus.

The 24-year-old scored seven goals and 14 points in 72 games with the Wild last season while also generating a goal in two postseason contests. His calling card would likely be the 2014 playoffs, as he scored four goals and seven points in 13 playoff games.

We’ll see if the two sides can hash out an agreement. If not, an arbitrator might need to determine how that production would translate into a contract.

Shea Weber’s arbitrator compared him to Duncan Keith, Brent Seabrook

NHL Awards Portraits

Even beyond the simple fact that there was such a lack of arbitration hearings this summer, there was some weird feeling that Shea Weber’s hefty one-year, $7.5 million award was special. The staggering dollar amount could make life pretty difficult for the Nashville Predators both in the coming season and over the long run, but it doesn’t seem like too outrageous a sum for the hard-shooting, hard-hitting defenseman.

It might not be totally out of line with his skills, but it’s still a pretty bold sum. It’s pretty natural to wonder how the arbitrator got to that point, which is something that The New York Post’s Larry Brooks unearthed today.

Apparently Michel Picher was the man who ultimately gave Weber that award (it’s possible that Predators fans might curse his name someday). Brooks reports that Picher rejected two names that the Predators used as comparables: underrated Phoenix Coyotes defenseman Keith Yandle and Winnipeg Jets hybrid blueliner Dustin Byfuglien. Instead, Picher only used two Chicago Blackhawks blueliners: Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook.

Now, you might be asking: but aren’t Keith and Seabrook actually registering sub-$6 million cap hits? (OK, maybe I was the only one asking that.) Well, Picher apparently factored in signing bonuses as well, focusing on compensation more than cap hits.

Here’s a little bit more from Picher via Brooks.

Would you trade Seabrook for Weber? Anybody would. Would you trade Keith for Weber? Almost anybody would.

“All that I can know is that in the coming season, Mr. Seabrook, who in my view has not achieved to the level of Shea Weber, will receive $7 million,” Picher wrote. “I find Mr. Weber’s position relative to Duncan Keith to be somewhat more problematic, [but] I am satisfied that Shea Weber should be placed slightly below Duncan Keith in the compensation market for the coming season.”

Hence, an elite defenseman is receiving a just reward of $7.5 million by virtue of a decision rendered by Picher that should become a model for any future arbitrator.

Brooks brings up a tough question (at least if you factor in each player’s body of work, not just last season): would you rather have Keith or Weber anchoring your defense? I’d honestly probably need at least a few days/a long walk in an Ilya Bryzgalov-approved park to make such a choice myself.

Anyway, it’s interesting to get a rare glimpse inside the mind of an arbitrator, something Brooks provided today. It’ll be intriguing to see if the Weber decision influences other high-profile cases in the future, which is why teams should follow this summer’s general model by avoiding the process at a all costs.

Predators, Shea Weber gear up for possible salary arbitration on Tuesday

Vancouver Canucks v Nashville Predators - Game Three

If Shea Weber and the Nashville Predators follow this summer’s pattern – a pattern that even maintained itself with similarly high wattage star Zach Parise – then they’re just going through the negotiating motions right now. The only case that actually went to arbitration was Chris Campoli’s, which really doesn’t count all that much since the Chicago Blackhawks were prepared to walk away from his award regardless of the amount.

That being said, today marked a rather important day in the process for Weber and the Predators. The Tennessean’s Josh Cooper reminds us that both sides are required to provide written briefs 48 hours before a scheduled arbitration hearing, which means that the Predators and Weber’s representatives must have done so this morning.

So, what does Weber’s side think and how much will the Predators argue for? Dirk Hoag of On the Forecheck provided a hearty analysis of the restricted free agent comparables* for Weber, pointing specifically to where Dion Phaneuf ranked in the minds of many hockey people way back before he became so expensive that the Calgary Flames had to trade him. (Predators fans must hope that the comparisons will stop there, though.) Hoag thinks that the Predators might offer Weber $6.5 million per year.

When balancing out this list of comparables, I could see the Predators coming in at a figure of $6.5 million annually. While there are some aspects of Phaneuf’s performance that were superior to Weber’s during the years leading up to his current contract, Weber does benefit from additional factors such as his being named team captain last summer, and his growing star power around the league due to his performance at the 2010 Olympics and at the World Championships.

On the other hand, the fact remains that while he has been among the top defensemen in a number of areas, he has yet to take the top spot, which argues for keeping him below what Stamkos just received.

source: APPerhaps Weber’s side will fall on the higher side of many peoples’ estimates by asking for $7.5 million, then?

Buddy Oakes thinks that both parties will make a near-last minute deal with an average between $7 million and $7.25 million per year for four or five years, which seems like a reasonable compromise for both sides. Weber would get paid handsomely (but not outrageously) while still setting himself up for one more big in-his-prime deal when it would expire. The Predators would lock up the face of their franchise for a few of his unrestricted years.

It’s important to note a point we’ve been hammering on quite a bit lately: it’s not just about keeping Weber in the fold. The Predators are a budget team with three potential budget-busting players set for near-future paydays: Weber, fellow defensive stud Ryan Suter and Vezina Trophy finalist Pekka Rinne. Suter and Rinne would qualify for unrestricted free agency if the Predators don’t sign them before July 2012. Those two won’t be easy to sign if they keep Weber, but re-signing the team’s renowned defenseman would be a clear sign to the rest of the “Big Three” that they intend to be a genuine contender going forward. (Click here for a roundtable discussion regarding which of the “Big Three” might be most expendable.)

Now that you’ve read a few guesses on what Weber and the Predators think he might be worth, how do you feel? Should he just sign a one or two-year deal and make Nashville prove that they can compete? Should he take less money and more years to help the team build a stronger squad? Is he worth $6.5 million-$7.5 million or perhaps more? Let us know in the comments.

* – Want more comparisons that might put Weber’s value (and the tough negotiations) in further context? Jeremy Gover also provided his own breakdown at Section 303.

Canucks forward Jannik Hansen hopes for big raise as arbitration approaches

Vancouver Canucks v Boston Bruins - Game Six

While 22 players filed for salary arbitration this summer, none have actually had a hearing yet. Ryan Callahan was the most recent of 17 players who avoided the often awkward process, signing a three-year deal worth $12.85 million on Wednesday.

If that trend continues, then there’s no reason to worry about Vancouver Canucks forward Jannik Hansen, whose salary arbitration hearing is scheduled for Friday. It might be different with Hansen, though, as the 25-year-old forward went through the process last year as well. Hansen received a one-year, $825K deal thanks to the 2010 hearing, but the Vancouver Sun indicates that Hansen hopes to at least double that salary after he scored a career-high 29 points and had a solid all-around season in 2010-11.

Arbitration hearings can be contentious and uncomfortable at times, but if a hearing does take place Friday, Canucks assistant GM Laurence Gilman said that he expects it to be a “respectful” process.

Gilman said the Canucks spend countless hours preparing their case and try to present it in a professional way. “With respect to the process itself I think in our tenure here the last couple of years we have demonstrated in the briefs we have written and in the hearings that we have been professional and respectful in the manner in which we’ve presented our cases.”

It’s quite possible that we might hear about a new deal today (or even a short time before the hearing is supposed to take place), but either way, we’ll keep an eye on the process. The arbitrator’s decision might not be revealed until this weekend or early next week, though.

With Dubinsky signed, the Rangers can turn their full attention to Ryan Callahan

Florida Panthers v New York Rangers

The New York Rangers and Ryan Callahan have an arbitration hearing scheduled this Thursday to determine Callahan’s salary for next season. If the team and player can control the negotiations, there’s no way an arbitrator will ever hear both sides of the argument. The Rangers will negotiate with Callahan and hopefully avoid a hearing just like they were able to do with Brandon Dubinsky as they reached a 4-year deal, $16.8 million deal at the very last minute. Callahan’s agent, Steve Bartlett, acknowledged that there was “a pecking order” and once Dubinsky’s deal was finalized, he and the team would be able to get down to business. Well, the time has come.

The two players have been linked at the hip during their tenure in New York—so it’s no surprise that their contract negotiations should affect one another as well. Blueshirt Banter’s Joe Fortunato notes that Callahan’s deal could be just as much—if not more than Dubinsky’s recent contract:

“The two deals have always expected to be similar. Both players play key roles on the team, although Callahan has the advantage of being the top candidate to be the next captain of the team. Callahan also has another advantage, his numbers last season are comparable to Dubinsky’s (Callahan finished the year with 48 points to Dubinsky’s 54) but Callahan missed 17 more games than Dubinsky did.”

Again, it makes sense that the players who are so often linked on the ice would command similar salaries off the ice. Unfortunately for GM Glen Sather and the Rangers, the contracts and negotiations won’t happen in a vacuum. Circumstances change with each and every deal; and after Dubinsky’s deal worth $4.2 million per season, the Rangers are inching closer to the salary cap. It’s a familiar position on Broadway, but then again, they aren’t usually staring at arbitration with a guy who could be their future captain (as early as next year). Houses of the Hockey explain the financial problems of signing Callahan:

“The problem with signing Callahan to the long-term deal in the range of $4-5 million that he rightfully desires is that the Rangers can afford his salary, but barely. Sather has $5.8 million in cap space, leaving minimal wiggle room throughout the season to possible acquire depth at the trade deadline during a playoff push.”

The importance of both Dubinsky and Callahan to the New York Rangers and their future can’t be overstated. Callahan’s 48 points were tied for 2nd on the team behind Dubinsky. Likewise, Callahan’s 23 goals were also second on the team—also behind Dubinsky. Now just imagine if Callahan was able to avoid the broken leg that prematurely ended his season after only 60 games. But it’s not just obvious points that Callahan brings to the table. He lead the Rangers forwards in shorthanded ice time, power play ice time, power play goals, game winning goals—all while facing the toughest competition over the course of the season.

There’s no way the Rangers want to go to arbitration, risk a one-year contract, and unrestricted free agency next season with a player who has the potential to be their next leader. Callahan brings everything to the table that a team would want—he throws his body around to create energy for his team, scores on the power play, kills penalties, and leads in the locker room. Since Brandon Dubinsky was able to land a 4-year deal worth $4.2 million per season, that’s the starting point for any negotiations from the Callahan camp. It’s tough to separate the two players—but once they are viewed on their individual merits, Callahan is the slightly more valuable player.

If the Rangers can get him in the $4.5 million range, they should happily take the deal and run. Whatever they agree to—it’s a safe bet that they’ll do everything in their power to lock-up the 26-year-old for more than a single season. If the dispute goes to arbitration for some reason, you’ll be able to hear the audible cheer from 29 front offices around the NHL. There’s no way the Rangers would want Callahan hitting the open market as he enters his prime next season. It’s their job to handle their business with Callahan like they did with Dubinsky before the two sides enter an arbitration hearing on Thursday. Like just about every other potential arbitration dispute, the two sides will likely reach a resolution before a third party has to get involved. The only questions for Callahan and the Rangers are: how long and how much?

Let’s throw this one out to the readers: after seeing Brandon Dubinsky get his 4-year contract worth $16.8 million, what do you think Ryan Callahan’s contract will look like?