Tag: salary arbitration hearings

Phoenix Coyotes v Nashville Predators

Shea Weber, Predators actually make it to salary arbitration today

In some ways, Nashville Predators GM David Poile seems like the Billy Beane of the NHL. Maybe his teams aren’t lighting the world on fire, but they win an impressive amount of games with a bargain basement team and an overarching philosophy. (The Predators replace the Oakland A’s tunnel vision for on-base percentage and playing the percentages in general with a steadfast approach to slowly developing prospects and playing world-class defense.)

Poile’s long run of competence makes this summer even stranger. First, the team dealt with the embarrassment (though not many, if any, significantly inflated costs) when Poile conjured Dale Tallon’s spirit by having a mishap getting qualifying offers to the team’s restricted free agents. Those issues would have been swept under the rug if it weren’t for everything that lead up to today.

It’s probably not fair to lay all the blame at Poile’s feet, but there will be many who point their fingers in his direction while discussing the fact that Shea Weber actually did make it to salary arbitration. The two sides still have time to make points and rebuttals, although Weber’s world-class status leads to some rather amusing Internet snark about the Predators’ lack of a counterargument. It’s easy to joke about the situation, but the bottom line is that the Predators must walk on egg shells while arguing any points against the face of their franchise. It should be abundantly obvious that this isn’t the best case scenario for Nashville.

We’ll keep you updated throughout today, although you must note that the arbitrator has 48 hours to crunch the numbers and make a decision. As Dirk Hoag pointed out, Weber and the Predators actually could come to terms on a separate contract during that period. If not, the Predators won’t have any choice but to accept the arbitrator’s one or two year award for Weber.

This is a nerve-wracking day for hockey fans in Nashville, with implications on the franchise and perhaps other notable restricted free agents (Drew Doughty) from around the league. Stick with us during your #WeberWatch as we follow that and other hockey news today.

This year’s arbitration cases could bring problems for Rangers and Sabres

Brandon Dubinsky, Ryan Callahan

The last hurrah of free agent season is upon us and it’s not when the last man standing signs on the dotted line. Instead it’s when salary arbitration hearings are had and those players get their new contracts squared away. While many players will look to get a deal done before their hearings go off, sometimes the two sides can’t come to an agreement.

The uncomfortable part about arbitration comes when the team argues against the player over why he shouldn’t be worth what he wants. It’s an awkward arrangement and can sometimes lead to bad feelings between player and management. This year, there are more than a few interesting cases to be settled out and for a few teams, they’re likely hoping that their court date doesn’t come to fruition. The NHLPA released the list of arbitration dates and some of the bigger cases will have a few more weeks to wait to be settled. Arbitration kicks off on July 20 and runs through August 4.

July 20: Teddy Purcell (TB), Lauri Korpikoski (PHX), Viktor Stalberg (CHI)

July 21: Andrew Cogliano (EDM), Brad Richardson (LA), Brandon Dubinsky (NYR)

July 22: Ryan Wilson (COL)

July 25: Andrej Sekera (BUF), Brian Boyle (NYR)

July 26: Kevin Porter (COL)

July 28: Josh Gorges (MTL), Ryan Callahan (NYR)

July 29: Jannik Hansen (VAN)

August 2: Shea Weber (NSH)

August 3: Chris Campoli (CHI), Blake Wheeler (WPG), Zach Parise (NJ)

August 4: Mark Fraser (NJ), Dan Sexton (ANH), Blake Comeau (NYI)

The New York Rangers have the most intriguing summer ahead of them should all three of their cases go to a hearing. With Dubinsky, Callahan, and surprise 20-goal scorer Boyle all potentially going to battle with Glen Sather, the Rangers’ current $51 million payroll could see quite a boost.

Obviously all eyes are going to be on the likes of Shea Weber and Zach Parise. Parise has said he’d take a one-year offer to avoid going to arbitration and having to deal with Lou Lamoriello in an argument. You can’t blame the guy for wanting to avoid that. The thought of that alone makes us cringe.

The guys to really wonder about in their cases are defensemen given how crazy the market for defensemen has gotten. One in particular, Andrej Sekera, could wind up getting a decision that makes life very uncomfortable for the Buffalo Sabres. If you remember last year, the Sabres had an awkward time with forward Tim Kennedy in which Kennedy won his case for $1 million, but not a large enough victory for the Sabres to walk away from. Buffalo wound up getting rid of Kennedy on waivers days later after being unhappy with his contract. Such is life in arbitration and a good reason why both sides like to avoid having the courts settle things out.

Parise wants to avoid arbitration, would consider one-year deal

Montreal Canadiens v New Jersey Devils

Another day has passed and yet another day without any news on the Zach Parise contract front. The Parise camp continues to work towards a long-term deal that would provide security while the New Jersey Devils continue to work on a deal that would make season for their team and salary cap structure. Without the threat of offer-sheets from opposing teams, both sides know they have until their arbitration hearing to work out a deal that is palatable for both sides. Today, it was announced that they’ll have until August 3rd. If they can’t work out a deal by then, both sides will present their cases to an independent arbitrator who will then decide on a contract amount based on the arguments heard.

In the arbitration hearings, basically the player’s agent will talk about how great their client is on the ice and in the locker room. The organization will counter with each and every fault the player has in painstaking detail. Zach Parise must have received the memo from his brethren in the players association: salary arbitration is not a pleasant experience. He knows that a salary arbitration hearing could get ugly:

“”That’s what I’ve heard. I’ve never been through that. Maybe that’s some of the reason why no one wants to go (to arbitration). You don’t want it to get ugly. I don’t think the organization wants it like that and we don’t want it like that.

“Hopefully we won’t have to go through that. I don’t think any organization wants to cut down their own player.”

Parise’s case could be an interesting if it ever makes it before an arbitrator. From the team’s perspective, the hearing couldn’t come at a better time. Parise is coming off a serious knee injury that caused him to miss 69 games last season. Obviously, his 13 games played, 3 goals, and 3 assists are all career lows for the former 1st round pick.  Those don’t exactly sound like a player who should have earned $5 million last season.

On the other hand, Parise has showed himself to be one of the most productive players from one of the best drafts ever. At only 26 years old, he already has 163 goals and 341 points in his career. He’s proven to be better than a point-per-game player when playing for his country in the World Championships and 2010 Olympics. Over the course of his last two season (when he was healthy), he piled up 83 goals and 176 points. These are exactly the type of stats an arbitrator will look at when determining Parise’s value. Those aren’t the stats of a good player—those are the stats of an elite NHL scorer.

It’s doubtful that the Devils would want an outsider to tell them how much a guy like that is worth on the open market.

With the August 3rd hearing date set today, both sides know they have almost four weeks to come to an agreement. If the Devils and Parise can’t come to a long-term agreement that gives both the team and player security, a one-year deal may be a necessary step in the process. Remember, if Parise accepts a one-year deal, he’ll be an unrestricted free agent at the end of next season. Then there will be no arbitrator to determine Parise’s salary—only the open market.

Can you imagine? And we thought the Brad Richards sweepstakes was crazy.