Ryan Reaves

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Why the Golden Knights got involved in Derick Brassard deal


If Vegas Golden Knights general manager George McPhee is to be believed, getting forward Ryan Reaves and a draft pick while not having to give up anything but some cap space was the meal ticket.

McPhee, who spoke to the media in Las Vegas during the first intermission of their game against the Vancouver Canucks on Friday, said they added grit to their lineup with Reaves after the Golden Knights were one of three teams involved in a wild trade that ultimately sent Derick Brassard from Ottawa to Pittsburgh.

Reaves, McPhee said, is a tough guy who can do more than just dole out physical punishment.

“Ryan is a big strong guy that brings some grit, some strong depth to our hockey club,” McPhee said. “He’s a unique player. These players, tough guys in this league, many of them have been rendered obsolete because they can’t play. (Reaves) can play.

The deal was convoluted, McPhee admitted, saying that it’s something that happens with three teams involved. He said it took four transactions to make it work.

“We gave up some cap space, we have a lot of cap space and a minor league player to do this, so we picked up two assets,” McPhee said. “I thought it was a good deal for our club.”

McPhee said he spoke with Pittsburgh a couple days ago, and the deal for Reaves came together quite quickly. He said the issues with the deal were more on the side of Ottawa and Pittsburgh and once those were worked out, the deal was made.

McPhee said he doesn’t necessarily believe the club needs to make moves.

“But if there are opportunities to make the club a little bit better, one percent, two percent, three percent, you do it if it’s not going to affect chemistry,” he said.

This may only be part of the story here for the Golden Knights.

Sportsnet’s John Shannon reported that Vegas may have got involved in the deal to block the Winnipeg Jets from getting Brassard.

Even though the Jets and Golden Knights wouldn’t meet until the third round of the playoffs — a lot would have to go right for that to happen — Vegas essentially made sure that if the scenario ever came to fruition, they wouldn’t have to deal with Brassard in the series.

If true, that’s some next level stuff by McPhee and Co.

McPhee played down those reports in his presser, saying it wasn’t a “material” part of the deal.

“We saw an opportunity to pick up Ryan Reaves and a draft pick in what was a simple transaction for us,” he said.

TSN’s Pierre LeBrun reported that the Jets were disappointed not to land Brassard after going “hard” after him. The move would have solidified Winnipeg’s spine, with Mark Scheifele, Bryan Little, Brassard and Adam Lowry down the middle. Winnipeg’s already a scary team without Brassard’s services. The fear factor would only have improved with him.

The Jets, reportedly, offered three pieces for Brassard, in what was a “solid” package. Given what Pittsburgh sent Ottawa’s way, that likely means a first-round pick, a roster player and a high-level prospect.

The Jets are now forced to look elsewhere, and perhaps they have the league’s newest team to blame for it.

A Jets-Golden Knights series would have a little more on the line if it comes to be this spring.

MORE: Pro Hockey Talk 2018 NHL Trade Deadline Tracker

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Penguins land Derick Brassard in three-team deal

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Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

There likely won’t be a more wild trade before the deadline than the one that took the better part of Friday to finally be completed.

The Pittsburgh Penguins had Ottawa Senators forward Derick Brassard in their grasp, then lost him, and then snatched him up again.

Penguins defenseman Ian Cole was headed to a bad team, then he wasn’t, and then he was again.

And somehow Ryan Reaves is now with the Vegas Golden Knights and the NHL’s newest team is retaining a bunch of salary.

The first trade: Penguins receive Derick Brassard; Senators get a first-round pick, Ian Cole and intriguing goalie prospect Filip Gustavsson.

This deal was rejected by the NHL for “improper use of salary retention,” so it was back to the drawing board for all involved.

The second (and actual) trade: Penguins receive Derick Brassard; Senators get a first-round pick, Ian Cole and intriguing goalie prospect Filip Gustavsson. This didn’t change.

Penguins also acquire a 2018 third round draft pick and prospect forward Vincent Dunn from the Senators; and they also get prospect forward Tobias Lindberg from the Golden Knights.

Vegas receives Ryan Reaves and a 2018 fourth-rounder (Vancouver’s) from the Penguins and also retains 40 percent of Brassard’s salary.

Why the Penguins made the trade: It’s been no secret that the Penguins have been looking for center help since losing Matt Cullen and Nick Bonino. Brassard fits that bill, and honestly, stands as a nice upgrade.

At 30, Brassard is still at or near his prime. The Penguins get Brassard for two playoff runs, as his $5 million cap hit runs through 2018-19.

Brassard’s quietly enjoyed a strong season in Ottawa, as he has 18 goals and 38 points in 58 games. He’s just one point shy of tying his 2016-17 total, even though that came in 81 contests. The former Rangers forward is battle-tested in the postseason, too.

No doubt about it, this is a contending team being aggressive to try to win a third straight Stanley Cup. Brassard makes an already-impressive offense that much deeper.

The inclusion of Cole helps make the money work for the Penguins, even if it’s worth noting that Pittsburgh still has some questions on defense.

Why the Senators made the trade: The Senators are in liquidation mode, and to start, this trade helps Ottawa get a first-rounder back after giving one up in the Matt Duchene trade. Granted, the Penguins’ first-rounder could be very low – they’d love it to be the 31st selection – but it’s a key return for the rebuilding Sens.

Gustavsson, 19, isn’t just a throw-in, either. He was a second-round pick (55th overall) in the 2016 NHL Draft. With Craig Anderson already 36, the Senators need to look to the future, and Gustavsson has a chance to be a part of the picture in net.

You can argue that Ottawa’s returns aren’t fully documented yet, as they might move Cole for even more futures:

This is also worth noting from a Senators perspective:

Why the Golden Knights made this trade: 

This one deserves a¯_(ツ)_/¯.

Vegas gets some grit in Reaves and a pick, but get roped into 40 percent of Brassard’s salary for some reason or another.

Who won the trade?

Senators fans are unlikely to be happy with the team cleaning house, particularly with players who helped them make a deep playoff run remarkably recently. Still, they’re diving in with a reset, if not a rebuild, and this is a decent return. Getting a bit more for Cole could help, and Gustavsson’s development will play a significant role in how this move is viewed in hindsight.

The Penguins are going for it, as they have been for some time. Brassard fills a serious need, and while defense is an issue for Pittsburgh, Cole found himself as a healthy scratch and obviously on the way out at times.

This is all about the present for Pittsburgh, and it’s easy to justify such a thought process. Let’s not forget that Sidney Crosby, Kris Letang, and Phil Kessel are 30 while Evgeni Malkin is 31. You never know when the championship window might slam shut.

Your excitement regarding the Penguins’ side hinges on how much you like Brassard. Not everyone is blown away by what he brings to the table.

This is an obvious case of two teams going in different directions, and thus looking for very different returns. Which team got the best value out of the deal, though?

It’s worth noting that the Penguins gave up a first-round pick and a prospect last summer to get Reaves.

With files from Scott Billeck

MORE: Pro Hockey Talk 2018 NHL Trade Deadline Tracker

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Fighting Ryan Reaves is not advised (Video)

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You have to wonder why anyone would feel compelled to drop the mitts with Ryan Reaves.

Do you admire the bravery? Laugh at the unfortunate circumstances? Or cringe at the pending doom?

They’re all plausible responses.

Columbus Blue Jackets forward Lukas Sedlak fell into one (or all) of these categories tonight.

Reaves was doing Reaves thing when he obliterated Markus Hannikainen against the boards in the Blue Jackets game against the Pittsburgh Penguins on Thursday night.

The destruction can be seen here:

Is that not charging?

At the end of that video, you can see Sedlak come in to stick up for his teammate. It’s the valiant thing to do, of course. But man, he must’ve been regretting it the whole way.

Sometimes it’s probably wise to pick up your buddy, your ball and just walk home.

Blues run Wild in Minnesota to even series


There were plenty of questions and concerns surrounding the St. Louis Blues early in this post-season, trailing the Minnesota Wild 2-1 in their first-round playoff series.

Perhaps the Blues provided some answers as to what they are capable of this post-season, as they crushed the Wild by a final score of 6-1 to even the best-of-seven series at 2-2 on Wednesday.

Everything that could go wrong, went wrong for the Wild, which found itself down three goals just after the halfway mark of the first period. It started with Ryan Reaves, recording his first career playoff goal and point to get the Blues on the board, and continued with an absolutely stunning goal from Vladimir Tarasenko in the second period and Wild puck stopper Devan Dubnyk getting shaken up and then eventually pulled after allowing six goals.

The Blues entered this game in potential danger of going back to St. Louis facing elimination, and the possibility of another first-round playoff exit.

The scenario prompted St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist Jeff Gordon to write about how Wednesday’s meeting with the Wild was “one of those statement games” for the Blues.

Video: Reaves gets Blues going with first career playoff goal and point


Ryan Reaves had appeared in 17 playoff games for St. Louis prior to Wednesday, and had yet to hit the score sheet. That changed in Game 4 between the Blues and Minnesota Wild.

Reaves opened the scoring with his first career playoff goal and point, blasting home a shot that beat Devan Dubnyk. Trailing 2-1 in the series and searching for answers after Game 3, the Blues took off from there.

They added two more goals — from Vladimir Tarasenko and David Backes — to take a 3-0 lead over the Wild by the 10:06 mark of the opening period. The Blues maintained that lead into the intermission.