Tag: Ryan Callahan

Andrew Ladd

Ladd wants to re-sign before season starts


If captain Andrew Ladd enters the season without a new contract, it will naturally raise questions that he would like to avoid.

“It would be nicer to get it done before the year … especially in a market like this, there are questions every day, so it’d be nice to move past it at some point,” Ladd said, per TSN. “I’ve been around long enough that I know sometimes these things take time. I think both parties are interested in getting something done. All the things add up.”

The 29-year-old forward has one season remaining on his five-year, $22 million contract, but his next deal is expected to be more lucrative. After all, he’s coming off of a campaign where he scored 24 goals and a career-high 62 points.

The Free Press estimated back in July that Ladd would ultimately get “north of $6 million” annually on a contract “worth in the range of $40 million.”

That would be in the same ballpark as the extensions for Brandon Dubinsky (six-year, $35.1 million) and Ryan Callahan (six-year, $34.8 million). All three of those players are fairly close in age and are noteworthy for being able to contribute offensively while maintaining a physical presence. Callahan is also a former captain.

Of course time is running out for Ladd and the Jets to agree to terms before the campaign begins and if they fail to do so, Ladd’s public eagerness to put this behind him will only add fuel to the speculation as to what the sticking point is. Which will, of course, lead to those daily questions.

Here’s a chart that shows which teams have been good/bad at drafting

Chicago Blackhawks v Columbus Blue Jackets

Via TSN.ca’s Travis Yost, here’s a chart showing draft success (or lack thereof) for all 30 NHL teams:


A team that’s done well at drafting will be in the top right. A team that hasn’t will be in the bottom left.

To be considered a “successful” draft pick, Yost determined that the player would have to play 100 games in the NHL. He adds that sorting by other metrics, like points or time on ice, yields “similar results.”

Yost was focusing on the New Jersey Devils’ lack of success in the draft; hence, the bold.

Now, obviously, a team like Columbus (which the chart shows has done well at drafting) is going to have an advantage in the first three rounds over a team like Vancouver (which hasn’t), since the Blue Jackets had much higher picks than the Canucks enjoyed from 2000-2012.

In fact, the Jackets had 11 top-10 picks over those 13 years, including Rick Nash going first overall, along with notable busts Gilbert Brule, Nikita Filatov, and Alexandre Picard. The Canucks, meanwhile, never drafted higher than 10th.

Of course, that doesn’t excuse Vancouver’s inability to find players in the later rounds. The last “successful” players the Canucks took after the third round were Mike Brown, who was a fifth-round pick back in 2004, and Jannik Hansen, who went in the ninth round that same year.

In contrast, the New York Rangers have been extremely successful in those later rounds, having identified the likes of Henrik Lundqvist, Marek Zidlicky, Ryan Callahan, and Carl Hagelin as worthwhile gambles.

Report: Rangers won’t re-sign St. Louis

New York Rangers v Pittsburgh Penguins - Game Four

The Martin St. Louis era in New York is apparently over.

Per the Post, the Rangers won’t be bringing back the 40-year-old veteran for a third season with the club. The news doesn’t come as a huge surprise — the Rangers don’t have a ton of financial wiggle room with new deals still needed for Derek Stepan, Carl Hagelin, J.T. Miller and Jesper Fast — but the development is still noteworthy, given what GM Glen Sather paid to acquire St. Louis and all that happened during his time as a Blueshirt.

New York advanced to the Stanley Cup Final in St. Louis’ first year with the club, then came within one game of getting back this season. While the veteran winger’s production dropped in 2014-15 — 52 points was his lowest total in over 10 years — St. Louis still managed to score 20 goals during the regular season and, given the Post’s report that he’s not ready to retire, there could be suitors for him in free agency.

Acquired at the ’14 deadline in exchange for Ryan Callahan and a first-round pick, St. Louis will finish his time in New York with 60 points in 93 games, and 22 points in 44 playoff appearances.

‘It took him a few years, but Victor Hedman’s arrived’

Ben Bishop, Victor Hedman, Marian Hossa

CHICAGO — Those who’ve been watching closely know Victor Hedman’s been among the NHL’s elite defensemen for a little while now.

Those who haven’t been watching closely, well, those people sure know now.

Hedman was brilliant in Tampa Bay’s 3-2 victory over the Blackhawks, on center stage in the Stanley Cup Final.

The 24-year-old’s excellence included a mighty assist on the game’s winning goal, when, with just over three minutes remaining in regulation, he picked up the puck at his own blue line, rushed his giant frame through the neutral zone, went wide on Brent Seabrook and used his reach to sling a perfect pass to Cedric Paquette, who directed it into the Chicago net.

“I said to him after the game, ‘How do you find those plays, man?'” said his defensive partner, Anton Stralman. “He’s very optimistic in that way. Likes to join the rush, usually makes really good reads, when to go, when not to go.”

Hedman was drafted second overall in 2009, right after John Tavares. He jumped into the NHL right away, but not with the spectacular results that some rookies have enjoyed.

Lightning captain Steven Stamkos is the only player on the current roster that was on that 2009-10 team with Hedman.

“It’s tough to come into the league as an 18-year-old defenseman. I think that’s the toughest position to be put in,” said Stamkos. “Especially in the position that we were in. We weren’t a great team. He was getting some minutes against some quality competition, and our team was struggling. He was kind of thrown into the fire. He’s matured as a player, matured as a person. You see the confidence that he has now. He steps up in all big moments.”

“Hedman, what he’s doing, I mean, this is clearly his coming-out party,” added Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper.

On top of the pass that Hedman made on the winning goal, he also set up Ryan Callahan’s first-period rocket past Corey Crawford, on one of the longest bombs you’ll ever see in a hockey game.

“We were pressured in the zone a little bit and trying to calm the play down a little bit,” Hedman explained. “I wasn’t going to give it to him. I saw their d-man fell. Tried to put it there. He made a good catch on his backhand. It was a hell of a shot. That was obviously a big goal. We probably got a little lucky that their d-man went down.”

Perhaps, but there was no luck in the second period when Hedman made arguably an even better pass, sending the puck high off the glass to give Nikita Kucherov a breakaway.

“Words can’t describe the force that he’s been out there for our team,” said Stamkos. “We’ve known how good he is all along.”

“Just the plays he makes, it’s fun to watch,” said Cooper. “He’s really grown into that role. It took him a few years, but Victor Hedman’s arrived.”

Related: Hanifin feels he has NHL ‘mindset,’ but won’t be ‘mad’ if he goes back to college

Lightning heap praise on ‘warrior’ Bishop

2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game Three

CHICAGO — “He was excellent,” said Jon Cooper.

“You need guys to step up —  he did,” said Steven Stamkos.

“He’s a warrior,” said Victor Hedman.

All three — Tampa Bay’s head coach, captain and best defenseman — agreed on one thing Monday night: Ben Bishop’s performance in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Final was huge.

How huge? Well, consider what transpired. Bishop stopped a series-high 36 shots while dealing with what appeared to be a pretty painful injury. He also bailed his team out of a first period the ‘Hawks thoroughly dominated.

The NHL’s tallest netminder then labored over the next two periods, often struggling to get to his feet after saves while looking about as uncomfortable as one can in a contest of this magnitude. Bishop also took a healthy knock on Brandon Saad’s goalie interference penalty, just for good measure.

But in the end, he was the winning goalie as Tampa Bay moved within two victories of the Stanley Cup.

Now don’t forget, in the hours prior to Game 3, it wasn’t known if Bishop would even play tonight. The Lightning were completely mum on the status of his health and, Monday morning, Bishop took a very limited skate before stonewalling reporters (but also apologizing for it, which was nice.)

After tonight’s tilt, the Bolts suggested they knew Bishop was in better shape than the media was led to believe.

“He was huge for us tonight,” Hedman said. “There was a little bit of a controversy going into tonight, but I think he showed how good he was and how healthy he is.”

Stamkos also suggested the team knows Bishop isn’t 100 percent, won’t be anytime soon, and that the narrative about his health isn’t going anywhere.

“The speculation is going to go on until this series is over,” Stamkos explained. “[Bishop’s] a competitor. He stepped up to the challenge tonight. He’s done it all playoffs.

“He’s been our best player a lot of nights and gave us a chance today.”

Ryan Callahan echoed those statements, explaining that regardless of how Bishop is feeling, the Bolts have faith that he’ll keep turning in solid performances.

“He’s out there, he’s out there,” Callahan said. “You don’t second-guess anybody this time of year. Everybody wants to play no matter what’s going on.

“He played big tonight.”