Tag: rumors

Philadelphia Flyers v Buffalo Sabres - Game Three

Mike Richards, Jeff Carter and the ‘Dry Island’: Two unnamed Flyers blame duo’s departure on partying


The Philadelphia Flyers’ franchise seems like it’s been defined by two things: partying and bullying. (Meanwhile, winning and finding solid goaltending are things that tend to come and go.)

HBO’s brilliant documentary “Broad Street Bullies” pointed out that the 1970’s-era team wore black arm bands when their favorite bar burned to the ground. (If that’s not a brazen ode to boozing, I don’t know what is.) Many hockey message boards/rumor mills generated gossip about various Flyers players having illicit affairs with teammates’ significant others over the years. It’s probably not a totally accurate way of describing the way the team does business, but sometimes these myths become larger than the truth in this modern, media-saturated era. Some might sense that Philly fans aren’t shy about appreciating players who are as hard-drinking as they are hard-nosed.

It’s no secret that many believe the surprising departures of Mike Richards and Jeff Carter had much more to do with “character issues” and “locker room chemistry” than on-ice performance. That being said, there really haven’t been many details floating around in major outlets, leaving fans to imagine all kinds of over-the-top scenarios.

The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Dan Gross published a rather interesting bit of gossip regarding the team’s inner politics today. Gross wonders if the duo of centers were indeed scuttled out of town because of their partying habits, citing two unnamed Flyers who provided their theories.

It’s important to note that those Flyers were anonymous, so apply the typical grains of salt. The more interesting detail, however, was one that even Flyers GM Paul Holmgren couldn’t deny.

Shortly after his arrival in December 2009, coach Peter Laviolette instituted what players came to call the “Dry Island.” Laviolette asked team members to commit to not drinking for a month, and each player was asked to write his number on a locker room board as a pledge. No. 17 (Carter) and No. 18 (Richards) were absent from the board on the first Dry Island, as well as the estimated five more times the policy was instituted.

In a phone interview Thursday, Flyers General Manager Paul Holmgren confirmed that Richards and Carter hadn’t put their numbers on the board, but said there had been others who declined. “We carry 23 players and there wasn’t 23 numbers up there.”

Holmgren was “really upset that this is out there. That’s our locker room. Our inner sanctum. Our board. Someone’s crossing a line here,” in discussing the Dry Island.

Don’t be surprised if clever Flyers fans respond to an especially heinous hangover by saying “Guys, this hangover makes me want to go to the Dry Island for a few weeks.” Of course, Holmgren also denied that Richards and Carter were traded because of their partying ways and Carter’s agent Rick Curran voiced a strong opinion about the matter as well.

Carter’s agent, Rick Curran, told us it was “bull—-” to suggest that the two were traded because of their partying. “You’re telling me a number of accusations [that] they are out partying and not focused on hockey. For someone to suggest that behind doors without having the balls to come out publicly, consider it for what it is,” Curran told us.

Perhaps Curran touches on a great concern that the Flyers couldn’t just trade away: it seems like the team has trouble keeping their locker room business private. Perhaps that’s toll one pays for doing business in a media atmosphere like Philadelphia, but that might be the clearest lesson from these issues.

On a whole, the Flyers have actually been a consistently successful hockey team. That hasn’t kept their club from being surrounded by drama, though. It’s hard to say that era is over even without Carter and Richards in the fold (whether they really lived up to their reputations or not).

(H/T to Rotoworld.)

Despite conflicting reports, Kings and Oilers have talked about deal centering around Ryan Smyth

San Jose Sharks v Los Angeles Kings - Game Six

Reports this evening broke from TSN’s Bob McKenzie that Los Angeles Kings veteran left winger Ryan Smyth has requested to be traded back to the team where it all started for him—the Edmonton Oilers. The story certainly has the drama to get attention: former 6th overall pick and Alberta native comes back home to finish out his storied career. Once in a while, we have to use the BS detector. When trade rumors are too good to be true, they usually are. Only in this case, it sounds like there could be something to story.

If the story were only that simple.

Upon hearing news, Jim Matheson of the Edmonton Journal contacted Smyth to comment on the story. Apparently someone forgot to tell Ryan Smyth that he had requested a trade. Here was Smyth’s response:

“Holy Cow … I have no idea where that’s coming from. I have not asked for a trade.”

Ah, the drama! The intrigue! Clearly, someone isn’t telling the truth. After McKenzie stood behind his story and LA Kings Insider Rich Hammond confirmed that trade talks had taken place between the two teams, Helene Elliott not only confirmed McKenzie’s story, but provided the motivation for Smyth to request a trade as well:

“A person with knowledge of the situation but not authorized to comment publicly confirmed that Smyth, citing his family’s best interests and preference for the city where he began his career, had his agent talk to Kings General Manager Dean Lombardi about a trade. Lombardi discussed scenarios with the Oilers but talks have dragged.”

Lombardi confirmed he had spoken to Smyth. “But I would like to keep those discussions private,” Lombardi said Monday.”

Let’s recap the story to this point: At first it was on. Then it was denied. Then it was confirmed to be on. But now that it’s been confirmed, the talks have started to drag. Got it? Good.

Despite questions about the return for Smyth, the deal makes sense for the Oilers the same way it made sense for the Kings two years ago. Two years ago, the Kings needed some veteran leadership to go with their stable of promising young talent. They had plenty of salary cap space and most other teams, had a place for a perennial 50 point scorer. Fast forward two seasons and it’s a similar situation for the Edmonton Oilers. They have a ton of young talent, but very few veterans who would be considered true “leaders.” That’s not a knock on Shawn Horcoff, Ryan Whitney, or Ales Hemsky—they just don’t have as much experience as a guy like Smyth. After all, none of them are nicknamed “Captain Canada.”

To see the trade from the Kings perspective, it takes a little more creativity. The Kings are running short on top 6 forwards; if they’re thin anywhere on their roster, it’s at left wing. In two seasons with the Kings, the 35-year-old Smyth has racked up 45 goals and 55 assists for an even 100 points. He scores on the power play, plays 18 minutes per game, and provides leadership for a roster that is still one of the youngest in the league.

For the Kings, the deal makes much more sense on the financial ledger. Smyth will make $4.5 million next season, but his cap hit is $6.25 million. If they were to go after a big name free agent next season (Hammond suggests Brad Richards), they could use the cap space much more than the money. If they were to go after an expensive free agent or wanted to make room for Brayden Schenn on the top two lines, then clearly Smyth’s contract would be the ideal one to move.

As for the assets returning to southern California in exchange for Smyth, that’s not quite as simple. Matheson explains:

“Neither the Oilers nor the Kings is talking about the Smyth trade rumour. The Oilers can’t comment on another team’s player because it would be tampering. The Kings went after Smyth, who waived his no-trade clause in Colorado, to agree to the deal with Los Angeles in 2009. If they dealt him now, they would have to get a top-six player back, in a perfect world.

However, the Oilers are not trading any of their high-end young guys — Taylor Hall, Jordan Eberle, Magnus Paajarvi — up front or any of their top prospects like Martin Marancin, Jeff Petry or Anton Lander.

Ales Hemsky has been the subject of many trade stories because his contract is up in July of 2102. Sam Gagner’s name has also come up because, if they draft Ryan Nugent-Hopkins first overall, maybe there wouldn’t be room for the 21-year-old centre. They aren’t giving up a bundle for a 35-year-old, even one as popular as Smyth.”

For now, trade talks have slowed and nothing is imminent. But as the draft approaches, there’s no doubt that Dean Lombardi and Steve Tambellini will certainly cross paths again in the next few days. If anything breaks, we’ll be sure to let you know.

Report: Heritage Classic won’t return next season, could return in 2012-2013

NHL Heritage Classic - Montreal Canadiens v Calgary Flames

During this season, the NHL had great success in pulling off two distinct outdoor games. There was the Winter Classic in Pittsburgh that saw the Penguins fall to the Washington Capitals and there was the Heritage Classic in Calgary, Alberta, Canada that saw the Flames shutout the Montreal Canadiens 4-0.

For next season, we’re hoping Canadian fans got their fill of the Heritage Classic because according to a report from ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun, the NHL will only be putting on the Winter Classic and not the Heritage Classic. The 2011 Heritage Classic was the first one held in eight years since the original took place in Edmonton in 2003 and featured the Oilers taking on the Canadiens. While the Heritage Classic this year was a huge financial success, the availability of locations in Canada appears to be a major problem. There’s also the issue of the league oversaturating the market for outdoor games by staging two of them per year.

For next season, it’s rumored that the Flyers and Rangers will face off with each other in Philadelphia at Citizens Bank Park on January 2, 2012. The NHL has yet to confirm those reports but it’s believed strongly that that’s what the matchup and location will be. Not doing a Heritage Classic is likely to ruffle many feathers north of the border, but in order to pull these off they have to have a place large enough to host it and in a location where weather won’t be a major factor. Cities like Toronto and Montreal have ideal weather but no real place to hold the games. Vancouver has a venue that could be used but the weather along the Pacific Coast doesn’t lend itself well to real winter-like conditions.

While the report says that the Heritage Classic won’t be played this year, there’s hope it’ll return for the 2012-2013 season. That could lead to the possibility of seeing one take place in Winnipeg but there are some issues there that would need to be settled as far as a venue plus the weather during winter in Winnipeg is harsh, cold, and windy. Not the ideal sort of thing for hockey outdoors. That will be some time away to think about. We’re sure the NHL enjoys putting on these events as they’re a cash cow to put on, but they have to have the locations needed to do it and that’s just something they don’t have enough of in Canada.

Report: 2012 Winter Classic set for Philadelphia between Flyers and Rangers

Citizens Bank Park

While we’re all focused on the Stanley Cup playoffs, rumblings about what’s going to happen next season are already firing up.

As always, the marquee midseason event is the Winter Classic and after the huge success that it’s been the last four years in Buffalo, Chicago, Boston, and Pittsburgh teams and cities are always hopeful of landing the annual event.

CSN Philly is reporting that the 2012 Winter Classic will be headed to Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia and will feature the Philadelphia Flyers taking on the New York Rangers on January 2. The January 2 date is, of course, deviating from the usual January 1 date for the Winter Classic and there’s a good reason why next year’s game will have a different date.

As CSNPhilly.com reported last month, because the Eagles and Redskins are playing on Jan. 1 at Lincoln Financial Field (assuming an NFL season and end of the lockout), the league was considering moving the game back a day because, sources said, the NHL did not want to go head to head with the NFL on New Year’s Day. Citizens Bank Park was the only option if the game were to be held in Philadelphia.

Avoiding a potential NFL weekend is a wise idea for the NHL and while some might criticize the league for getting off of the traditional New Year’s Day date, the event is meant to be a TV sensation to showcase the game. Going up against the NFL wouldn’t get the game the kind of showcase they’d be looking for.

Of course, there’s the possibility that the NFL will be locked out as well. It’s not believed that the date of the game would have the date shifted if the NFL is out of commission for the year.

For the Flyers, it would mark their second appearance in the Winter Classic after appearing in the 2010 Winter Classic in Boston against the Bruins. For the Rangers it would be their first appearance in the New Year’s Day event and while New York would love to host the event, there’s not a facility that appeals to everyone to host it in New York City. Should Yankee Stadium ever become available in the future that would be the optimal venue. For now, the Pinstripe Bowl takes up all the time in the Bronx needed to get the stadium ready for the Winter Classic.

No announcement has been made so this is just speculation for now, but if you’re thinking about where you might want to spend New Year’s for hockey purposes, it might be time to start looking into Philadelphia.

Patrick Kane denies rumors that he missed practices because of a ‘two-day hangover’

Chicago Blackhawks v Phoenix Coyotes
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Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin are still the two highest profile players in the sport, but no hockey star seems to be a tabloid magnet (sometimes fair, sometimes not) quite like Patrick Kane.

Perhaps it comes with the territory, though. For one thing, Kane isn’t just a flashy hockey player, he’s a flashy American hockey player. He isn’t a bountiful source of one-liners on the same scale as Jeremy Roenick, but he isn’t a clichebot like Crosby either. And let’s face it: Kane isn’t shy about having a good time.

Kane’s somewhat wild reputation (built on the regrettable cab driver incident and those mostly-just-embarrassing shirtless limo photos) leads many to jump to conclusions – right or wrong – about the slick winger’s social life. Deadspin ran a story Friday claiming that Kane missed Chicago’s Monday and Tuesday practices because of a “two-day hangover” rather than flu-like symptoms. This is far from the first time that an NHL player has been accused of having the booze flu, but Kane denied the story to Chris Kuc, saying that the photos were old and that he was indeed sick.

Ultimately, it’s a game of he-said/huge Internet rumor Web site-said between Kane and Deadspin, but there are a few important takeaways:

1. There are no reports that Kane hurt himself or anyone else, meaning the stakes are pretty marginal even if the report is accurate and the photos were from this weekend.

2. Sports athletes (and in some cases, owners such as Jerry Jones) shouldn’t ever pose for photos with people when they’re out having a few drinks.

(Honestly, if I was in Kane’s position, I’d probably force everyone to check their cell phones/cameras at the door in any situation in which spirits might be consumed.)

You can watch Kane refute the reports (and discuss his team’s struggles) in the video below, via CSN Chicago. This story will probably go away, but it does beg the question: did Kane already lose the benefit of the doubt in many circles?