Tag: Rogers Arena

Darcy Hordicchuk Rick Rypien

Canucks fans plan to memoralize Rick Rypien at Rogers Arena on Wednesday

Regardless of how it happened, Rick Rypien’s death saddened many in the hockey world tonight. Twitter and other Internet venues have seen many accounts of support for the fallen enforcer as word surfaced that he died at the age of 27.

In tough times like these, it’s important to look beyond tragic ends and remember the positive impact a person made. Rypien signed a one-year contract with the Winnipeg Jets in June, but every game he played in the NHL took place in a Vancouver Canucks sweater.

Much like Derek Boogaard with the Minnesota Wild, it’s likely that Rypien’s death will hit Canucks fans the hardest of any NHL fan base. It only makes sense, then, that Canucks fans look like they will follow in the footsteps of Wild fans by memorializing Rypien on Wednesday. As you may remember, about 350 Wild fans gathered at Xcel Energy Center to pay tribute to Boogaard, with the informal memorial service also including comments by Boogaard’s family members and Wild GM Chuck Fletcher.

According to that Facebook event, the “Rick Rypien Celebration of Life” will take place at 2 pm (pacific time) at the Roger Nielson statue outside of Rogers Arena. We’ll keep an eye on what’s likely to be a very emotional event.

(H/T to Nucks Misconduct.)

Comparing Vancouver noise levels in Stanley Cup finals to Chicago and Philadelphia in 2010

Stanley Cup Bruins Canucks Hockey

Last year, we followed the competing noise levels between Chicago Blackhawks and Philadelphia Flyers fans during the 2010 Stanley Cup finals. NHL.com is keeping track of the ear-splitting volumes of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals as well, so we thought it would be interesting to follow those trends again.

Before we get into the Decibel Meter readings for Game 2 in Vancouver, NHL.com provides some context about how these sound levels would affect your hearing (and comfort) during a game.

Level at which sustained exposure may result in hearing loss:      90 – 95dB
Pain begins:     
Loudest recommended exposure WITH hearing protection:      
Loudest sound possible:      

Looking at last year’s first four games, Chicago’s crowd hit 121dB and 122dB peaks in their first two home games while Philadelphia hit 114dB and 118dB in Games 3 and 4. While we couldn’t find readings from Game 1 in Vancouver, NHL.com provides some of the highest levels of noise saturation in Game 2. Here are some of the most interesting readings.

Pre-game “Manny! (Malhotra) chant: 98dB – like a snowmobile
Malhotra’s first shift, appears on video screen: 108dB – Power saw
Burrows’ first goal: 111dB – Sandblasting
Daniel Sedin’s tying goal: 114dB – Loud rock concert
Burrows scores the OT winner: 117 dB – Loud rock concert
Fans chant “We Want the Cup” – Snowmobile

Obviously, it became very loud at points in Rogers Arena during Game 2, yet Chicago’s crowd hit higher peaks in both of their games and Philadelphia managed a higher peak in Game 4. That doesn’t mean that they were louder over the long haul, but it might give some credibility to Philly and Chicago as strong hockey markets if they can hang with a Canadian one.

The Canucks crowd’s loudest times provided a stark contrast to some long stretches when it seemed like you could hear a pin drop in Game 2 in Vancouver (or so it seemed on TV, at least). The Vancouver audience seemed substantially subdued when Boston was holding onto a 2-1 lead in the third period, prompting many (myself included) to wonder why they were so rattled when the Canucks were only trailing by a single goal. Obviously, that solemn atmosphere didn’t last forever, especially once Daniel Sedin notched things up by scoring on a yawning net.

It’s quite possible that Vancouver fans were simply terrified that the team might let its best chance to win a first-ever Stanley Cup slip away. That’s an understandable fear and they certainly showed great passion when the Canucks got back into the game (and also showed fantastic spirit when Malhotra completed his courageous comeback).

Please keep in mind that there probably aren’t big differences in these results; ultimately these fan bases are making a ton of noise. That being said, it’s fun to back up (or refute) assumptions about loud crowds with hard numbers. We’ll let you know how the crowds in Boston perform as the Bruins try to fight their way back into this series and we’ll also keep an eye on Vancouver’s crowds if the series stretches to five games or more.

Plenty of Canucks fans buying tickets in Boston, Bruins fans not as willing to travel to Vancovuer


Yesterday we put up some rough statistics about aftermarket ticket prices following a cursory glance over at StubHub. Here’s the short story: tickets are expensive in Boston and crazy expensive in Vancouver. Since then, we’ve acquired a few more numbers directly from Stubhub to give a better picture of just how strong the demand has been for tickets this year.

Over 1,400 tickets combined for all four potential games in Vancouver. Fans are looking at prices in the $800 range just to get in the building. There are about 250 tickets for Game 1 on Wednesday and 500+ tickets for Game 2 on Saturday.

On the other hand,over 7,000 tickets combined for all three potential games in Boston. It’ll only cost fans in the $500 range to get into TD Banknorth Garden. According to the folks at StubHub, the prices have been holding steady since last week.

As far as actual tickets that have already been sold, fans are paying an average price of $900 for Games 1 and 2 in Vancouver. The least expensive ticket purchased has been $400 (Upper Bowl Goal 319, Game 1), while the most money shelled out for a ticket has been $3,500 (Club 106, Game 1). For a point of reference, fans were paying an average price of $720 for Games 1 and 2 in Chicago.

In Boston, things are a little cheaper; fans are paying an average price of $670 for Games 3 and 4 in Boston. The range of tickets purchased has been $375 (Balcony Side 330, Game 3) to $4,724 (Loge Glass 11, Game 3). At this time last year, fans were paying an average price of $575 for Games 3 and 4 in Philadelphia.

The most interesting figures have been where the ticket purchases have been coming from. Purchases for the games in Vancouver have been fairly predictiable: British Columbia 39% of purchases, Alberta 13%, Ontario and Washington each 8%, and California 7%. Who knew there were that many Bruins/Canucks fans in California? Surprisingly, buyers from New England states make up less than 2% of all purchases for games in Vancouver.

The story is a little different for the games being played in Boston. The top buyer states/provinces for the games in Boston are Massachusetts 36%, Ontario 11%, British Columbia 8%, New York 5%, New Hampshire and Alberta each 4%. New England states are accounting for 45% of the buyers for these games; but 25% of the buyers for these games are from Canada.

Do you think there will be a few Canuckleheads in Boston for Games 3 and 4?

Looking to go to the Stanley Cup finals? Expect to pay more than $1,000 for tickets

Tampa Bay Lightning v Boston Bruins - Game One

Every year we do a story like this and every year we’re blown away by the staggering prices but you won’t believe what you’ll have to pay in order to get tickets to the Stanley Cup finals. This year with the games taking place in Vancouver and Boston, two of the normally pricier tickets in the NHL to begin with, the demand for tickets to the finals are sky high and likewise the prices are too.

According to ticket search site for fans FanSnap, if you’re aiming for tickets in either Boston of Vancouver expect to pay up in a big way to get them on the secondary market.

According to the site, the average ticket price for seats to Games 1,2, or 5 at Rogers Arena in Vancouver will break the bank for $1,927. If you’re aiming for tickets just to Game 1 and want to see the first Stanley Cup final game in Vancouver since 1994, you’ll be paying an average of $1,430. If you’re hoping to catch a break on tickets, you’ll be looking to get to Boston for Games 1,2, or 6.

For tickets to TD Garden in Boston for any of those three games, the average price will kick your bank account to the tune of an average of $1,109. If you just want to be at the first Stanley Cup finals game in Boston since 1990 you’ll be looking to pay an average of $935 to Game 3.

Of course, if you’re looking for single ticket deals there are some to be had though according to FanSnap. In Boston, a seat can be had in the balcony for Game 4 for $398. If you want to skimp out on a cheap ticket in Vancouver, you’ll need to sit in the upper level on the goal end at Game 1 for a highly affordable price of $600.

While high ticket prices for the finals aren’t a shock by any means seeing such astronomical numbers never gets less stunning to see. Seeing how rough the ride is to get tickets in Canada in a city where the home team has their best shot at a Stanley Cup in their 40 year history makes it all the more fascinating to see. What we’ll be curious to see how out of control things get if there’s a Game 7 to be played there.