Tag: Road to the Cup

Kings Rangers

Discover: Road to the Cup – the finals thus far


The Los Angeles Kings made history before this series even began by going to Game 7 in each of their first three series and winning every time. They developed a reputation for their resiliency, but the New York Rangers arrived to the Stanley Cup Final under similar circumstances.

They played in just one less game than the Kings over the first three series and overcame a 3-1 series deficit against the Pittsburgh Penguins along the way.

When these two teams finally collided though, it was the Kings’ ability to bounce back that trumped the Rangers’. New York established a 2-0 lead in Game 1 and 2, but in both cases Los Angeles rallied back to win in overtime. With that, the Kings had a 2-0 series edge without leading at any point in the series.

“We can’t take any solace [in two close games] because we lost,” Rangers forward Brian Boyle insisted after the team’s second setback.

“We came here to win games. It doesn’t matter how the hell we do it, we have to win the game. If you don’t win the game you didn’t do what you came to do and that’s the worst feeling there is.”

Game 3 was a different beast as the New York Rangers got power-play opportunity after power-play opportunity, but Jonathan Quick was at his best, stopping 32 shots to lead Los Angeles to a 3-0 victory. The Kings stretch without holding the lead in a playoff game ended at 249:14 minutes, per LA Kings Insider.

With the New York Rangers on the brink of elimination, it was their chance to show what they could do in the face of adversity. New York took a 2-0 lead for the third time in this series and actually managed to hold onto it. They had luck on their side, as on two separate occasions the puck stopped moving just before the Rangers’ goal line, but Lundqvist also had a great game, stopping 40 of 41 shots.

The Rangers set an NHL record by winning their eighth straight home game when facing elimination. Lundqvist had a 0.99 GAA and .968 save percentage in those eight contests, according to NHL.com.

Los Angeles still has a commanding 3-1 lead and more than enough talent to finish off this series, but that doesn’t mean the finals are as good as done either. The Kings have suffered from slow starts against the Rangers and while they’ve managed to overcome that most of the time, it burned them in Game 4 and that might happen again if they allow New York to have any life early in Friday’s contest.

Although the Kings still have three chances to win, this game is important to them. If they can’t finish the Rangers off tonight, then the series will return to Madison Square Garden where the Rangers will attempt to extend their record-breaking streak. If New York is successful, then there will be a Game 7 and all bets are off at that point. In other words, even if Game 5 isn’t the Kings last chance to bury the Rangers, it is their best one.

Discover ‘Road to the Cup’: Los Angeles Kings

Bill Daly, Dustin Brown

For the second time in just three years, the Los Angeles Kings will play in the Stanley Cup Final.

They needed just 12 games to get this far back in 2012. It was a very different story this time around…

Round 1: Beat San Jose 4-3

The Kings didn’t exactly start the playoffs off on the right foot. The Sharks outscored them 13-4 over the first two contests, shifting the talk away from Los Angeles and towards the possibility of San Jose making a serious run at the Stanley Cup. When the Sharks edged out the Kings in overtime in Game 3, it seemed like Los Angeles’ elimination was all-but inevitable.

Only three teams had ever overcome a 3-0 series deficit, but Los Angeles wasn’t deterred. The Kings not only won their next four games, but they did so by wide margins, outscoring San Jose 18-5.

Round 2: Beat Anaheim 4-3

The Ducks and Kings had a long-standing rivalry fueled by geography, but this was the first time the crosstown rivals were actually pitted against each other in the playoffs. They made it a series to remember.

Los Angeles took the first two games, prompting Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau to shake things up by starting goaltender Frederik Andersen over Jonas Hiller. Andersen was solid in Game 3, leading to Anaheim’s first victory of the second round, but the netminder suffered a lower-body injury in the process.

Rather than go back to Hiller for Game 4, Boudreau decided to start 20-year-old John Gibson, who shut out the Kings in Game 4 and led Anaheim to a third straight victory in Game 5 with his 39-save performance.

Once again the Kings were on the brink of elimination, but they rallied back. For the second straight time, the Kings’ Game 7 wasn’t even close as they scored three goals in the first period en route to a 6-2 victory.

Western Conference Final: Beat Chicago 4-3

Since Darryl Sutter took over as the Los Angeles Kings head coach, only one team has managed to beat them in a playoff series, and that’s the Blackhawks. The defending Stanley Cup champions took Game 1 against the Kings and held a 2-0 lead late in the second period of Game 2.

It looked like the Kings might have finally met their match, but they broke out with six unanswered goals to even the series. From there they jumped to a 3-1 series lead — their largest margin of the 2014 postseason.

Chicago gave the Kings a taste of their own medicine though by taking Game 5 and then overcoming a 3-2 deficit in the third period of Game 6 to win on the strength of a Patrick Kane goal.

Los Angeles consequently had to play in a third Game 7 and this time they were against an opponent that wouldn’t wilt under the pressure as Chicago got off to a 2-0 lead. When the Kings rallied back with two goals in under a minute, Patrick Sharp responded just 12 seconds later to reestablish Chicago’s edge.

By the third period, Chicago had a 4-3 lead, but Marian Gaborik tied it with 7:17 left to play in regulation and defenseman Alec Martinez gave the Kings their first lead of the contest with the game-winning overtime goal.

Discover ‘Road to the Cup’: New York Rangers

Montreal Canadiens v New York Rangers - Game Four

It’s been 20 years since the Blueshirts have been to a Stanley Cup Final — and now, they’re just one win away.

Getting to this point, though, hasn’t been easy. Let’s take a look back at how the Rangers advanced…

Round 1: Beat Philadelphia 4-3

New York’s opening-round opponent was its bitter divisional rival and, as you’d expect in a series between two teams separated by just two points in the standings, this one went the distance.

The series was as back-and-forth as it gets, with the Rangers and Flyers alternating wins until New York captured the final and most important one in Game 7 at MSG. As for individual performances, the Rangers were paced by the offensive contributions of Brad Richards, who made amends for last year’s disappointing playoffs by scoring six points in seven games (three coming in a Game 1 victory). Henrik Lundqvist was also his usual solid self, finishing the series by stopping 26 of 27 shots in the Game 7 victory, good for a .963 save percentage and second star honors.

As the series came to a close, an interesting narrative began: Philly and New York played Games 6 and 7 on back-to-back nights, and the Rangers had little time to celebrate as they were forced to start their second round series against the Penguins soon after.

Round 2: Beat Pittsburgh 4-3

Talk about scheduling dominated the early parts of this series, as Rangers head coach Alain Vigneault said it was “stupid” how, after Game 3, the Rangers had played five times in seven nights.

Pittsburgh took advantage of a tired club and raced out to a 3-1 lead on the Rangers during this stretch, but the Blueshirts found momentum amid tragedy following the passing of Martin St. Louis’ mother prior to Game 5. St. Louis played inspired hockey in the aftermath, scoring two points in the final two games — including a goal in Game 6, played on Mother’s Day — as the Rangers rallied from a 3-1 deficit to win a playoff series for the first time in franchise history.

That put New York on the road to where it’s at today. The Rangers still sit in the driver’s seat over Montreal — leading three games to two — despite losing Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Final at the Bell Center. Should they put away the Habs, the Blueshirts would be back in a Stanley Cup Final for the first time since Mark Messier captained them to a championship in ’94, which snapped a 54-year Cup drought in the process.