Rick Tocchet

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Rick Tocchet on Coyotes’ struggles, Clayton Keller, staying patient (PHT Q&A)

The Arizona Coyotes have won just three of their first 21 games, which obviously wasn’t part of the plan going into the year. Still, things aren’t always as bad as they seem.

On Thursday morning, Pro Hockey Talk had an opportunity to catch up with Coyotes head coach Rick Tocchet. We chatted about the rough start to the season, Clayton Keller‘s incredible rookie season, the positives he’s seen in his team’s game, and much more.

Enjoy.

PHT: Coach, you came from an environment where you won back-to-back Stanley Cups with the Penguins. You’ve come to Arizona and you’re now coaching a team that’s trying to find themselves. What’s been the most difficult part for you mentally?

TOCCHET: “You want instant success. Obviously, the last couple of years have been unbelievable for me, so you come to this and you want the same thing to happen, but it doesn’t happen that way. It’s a process. That’s the one thing I like about the organization, we’re not going to accelerate to win short term. They’re willing to take hits now for the process of it. That’s something I’ve gotten better at in the last two or three weeks. I know it hurts to lose.

“I still don’t think we’re a two-win team. I think, with some solid goaltending early in the season, we’d have four or five wins by now. Saying that, I think it’s just a process we have to stick with.”

How far do you think this team is from being a playoff team?

“I don’t know. I could tell you it’s three years or two years, but I don’t know. All I know is that I want these young kids to improve. I feel certain guys are playing better. I think some guys are starting to get it.

“The biggest challenge for us is to keep doing the right things when you lose. Because when you lose, you change your game sometimes, you try different things that you shouldn’t try. And that’s the biggest challenge for me, is to make sure that these kids do the right things and that this team does the right things because eventually it’s going to help.”

I know two wins in your first 20 games isn’t how you drew it up, but what are some of the improvements you’ve seen in your team since the start of the season?

“Well, some of the top teams we’ve played (against), where it’s 2-2 with five minutes left. We look at the scoresheet at the end of the game and they had 15 chances, we had 15. So we’re playing even up for 45-50 minutes, but it’s that 10 minutes where we lose the game because of consistency or the other team just has great players, too. It’s something that we have to learn to play 60 minutes. It’s hard to win in this league and it’s hard to play the right way for 60 minutes, and that’s what we have to learn here. It’s about mindset.”

I think everyone knew Clayton Keller was a skilled player, but how surprised are you to you to see him play close to a point-per-game pace 20 games into the season?

“Yea, he’s been really good. What marvels me is that he’s a 19-year-old kid. He’s only going to get stronger, and he’s going against top players against other teams and how he’s coming out of the corners with pucks. He’s got the puck on his stick and he’s making plays. That’s what’s really been surprising to me.

“I didn’t know he was going to be this good this quick. The arrow is just pointing (up), he’s only going to get better. The only thing I keep teaching him is don’t get frustrated. Because when you lose and you’re not getting points-the last couple of games he hasn’t gotten points- you get frustrated, and I don’t what that frustration to affect his game.”

Everyone sees the offensive ability in his game, but is there something he does that flies under-the-radar a little bit?

His poise in the corners. As a small guy, sometimes you think ‘ah, he’s not a good corner guy,’ but when he gets in the corners somehow he has elusiveness. Like, he gets out of the corners with the puck, he doesn’t just throw pucks away, he’s not scared. He’s been going in the corners with some really good defensemen and I think he’s done a nice job coming out of it, making a play. He doesn’t throw pucks away.

“Usually, young guys when they first come up they get the puck, they throw it away. They don’t realize how much more time they have sometimes. I think he’s exceeded that for me.”

How have you changed from when you were the head coach in Tampa Bay (2008-2010)?

“I think I’m more decisive. You have to tweak your lineup, you have to tweak certain concepts, but I’m totally different. I know the way I want to play, I’m not going to change (it), I know it’s successful. I know the certain players that I want and the team I want to become.

“In Tampa, I think I listened outside too much to other people. Obviously, you have to listen to the people in your organization, but I know this is the way I want to play and I’m very decisive about it.”

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Penguins appreciate now-Coyotes coach Tocchet’s role in Cup wins

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When Rick Tocchet returns to Pittsburgh, he will see another Stanley Cup banner in the rafters and be celebrated for his part in earning it.

Tocchet doesn’t plan on reminiscing too much about the Penguins’ back-to-back titles, except perhaps for one important moment.

”I’m looking forward to my ring, yeah,” he said.

Tocchet will get his third Penguins Cup ring, his second as an assistant coach after one as a player, when he visits as coach of the Arizona Coyotes on Tuesday night. Whether it was fostering relationships with Phil Kessel and younger players or running the power play that scored on 21.9 percent of its chances during the 2016 and 2017 Cup runs, Tocchet was a valuable piece of the organization and is appreciated as such.

”The role he had, he did it extremely well,” Penguins general manager Jim Rutherford said Monday. ”He had a good read on the players and was able to communicate on a one-on-one basis with whatever they were dealing with hockey-wise and personally or whatever. He did a terrific job for us and played a key role.”

Tocchet settled into a comfortable spot on Pittsburgh’s coaching staff, especially once Mike Sullivan took over for Mike Johnston in December 2015. Sullivan values Tocchet’s knowledge and said over the summer they grew to trust each other through some challenging times.

Tocchet doesn’t want to claim an oversized chunk of the credit for the Penguins’ back-to-back championships.

”You just do your part,” Tocchet said after the Coyotes’ morning skate in Washington. ”The players for me are the major contributors, Mike Sullivan obviously making the decisions. … Even a team that wins a Stanley Cup, your fourth-line player has to do something. To win a Cup, everybody has to kind of pull the rope, and that’s the way we did in Pittsburgh. Whether you’re a player, coach, a scout or whatever, I think everybody contributed.”

The Penguins are planning a video tribute to Tocchet to play during the Coyotes’ only visit of the season, and fans no doubt feel a special connection with him after he also played on the 1992 Cup team. But the 53-year-old pointed to his Stanley Cup party over the summer as closure on his Pittsburgh days and insisted his focus is on helping Arizona rebound from losing 13 of its first 15 games.

Of course, one text he got in the middle of the struggles shows how likable he was to Penguins players. It came from captain Sidney Crosby with a simple message: ”Hang in there.”

That kind of camaraderie is already building with the young Coyotes, who routinely ask Tocchet about Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and others to pick his brain about some of the best in the game.

”Obviously guys are interested in what (Crosby has) done because of how successful he was and his relationship with Coach Tocch,” Coyotes rookie forward Clayton Keller said. ”It’s good to have that relationship. Not many guys get to work with Sidney Crosby. He definitely has a lot of information.”

Tocchet feared early in his Arizona tenure that he was name-dropping Crosby and the Penguins a little too much. Only his new players keep asking, and he has enough in the memory bank from the past three years to keep it coming.

”It’s mostly the players engaging: ‘Hey, what does Crosby do in these situations? What does Malkin do in this situation? How does this guy do that?”’ Tocchet said. ”So that’s the engagement, and I love that because they want to learn. If you’re 20-year-old kids, they watch YouTube. They want to see how these guys do certain things, and I love that about it.”

As Tocchet passes on what Penguins stars did at practice or in key situations, he’s conscious that their success as a team helped him get his first job since parts of two seasons with Tampa Bay from 2008-2010.

”I was very fortunate to have a great staff, work for Mike Sullivan,” Tocchet said. ”I learned a lot from him. And I also learned a lot from the players. I was lucky enough to coach the Crosbys, Malkins, Kessels, Letangs – high-end guys that keep you on your toes.”

Follow Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/SWhyno .

For more NHL coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey

Martin rejoins Pens’ coaching staff as special assistant to Johnston

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Jacques Martin will have a new role with the Pittsburgh Penguins next season the club announced on Tuesday.

Martin will now be a special assistant to head coach Mike Johnston.

During the 2014-15 season Martin was a part of the Pens’ coaching staff in a scouting and advisory role. The 62-year-old was in charge of pre-scouting opponents and providing the coaching staff with opponent’s tendencies, strengths and weaknesses.

“One is personnel, on players, some strengths and areas that we can exploit on certain players,” Martin said of his role last season. “The second component is looking at the team’s play, systems and what we can to do to counteract that.”

Martin will continue to pre-scout opponents next season, but will do it via video.

His new role will be to analyze games from the media level and provide instant analysis to Johnston and his assistants on the bench.

“I’m really looking forward to it,” Martin said. “I have a good relationship with the coaching staff and management. Being closer to the team and provide feedback, use my experience from over the years, just giving them another opinion.”

Martin joined the club as an assistant coach in 2013-14 on Dan Bylsma’s staff. Last season his official title was senior advisor of hockey operations.

According to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, assistant coaches Gary Agnew and Rick Tocchet will remain on the bench with Johnston.

It’s Pittsburgh Penguins Day at PHT

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Throughout the month of August, PHT will be dedicating a day to all 30 NHL clubs. Today’s team? The Pittsburgh Penguins

Another year with Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin in their prime turned into another year without a Stanley Cup.

The Penguins got an MVP season out of Crosby, who was head and shoulders above everyone last season, but wound up getting bumped out in the second round of the playoffs by the New York Rangers. Making matters worse, the Pens had a 3-1 lead in the series until Henrik Lundqvist turned into brick wall.

Crosby struggled in the postseason and not just because of Lundqvist and Sergei Bobrovsky’s heroics. A rumored wrist injury may or may not have slowed him down. He also didn’t get a lot of help from his teammates. Outside of Malkin, Jussi Jokinen, and Matt Niskanen others failed to show up. James Neal, Chris Kunitz, and Kris Letang all had lackluster performances.

The Pens got a breakout season from 19-year-old Olli Maatta on defense and managed to dance around a stroke to Letang during the regular season to have a solid year on the blue line. Niskanen’s big season helped soften the blow of losing Letang and Paul Martin was steady as well.

In goal, Marc-Andre Fleury was steady as anyone putting up a .915 save percentage both in the regular season and playoffs. While he’s always easy to point the finger at when things go south, he wasn’t Pittsburgh’s problem last season. A lack of strong forward depth, especially in the wake of losing Pascal Dupuis for the season, and defensive injuries helped make life a lot harder than it had to be during the season and worse still during the playoffs.

Offseason recap

If was a summer of front office changes for the Pens. Both GM Ray Shero and coach Dan Bylsma were sent packing and in came former Carolina Hurricanes GM Jim Rutherford as well as first-time NHL coach Mike Johnston from the WHL Portland Winterhawks. After bowing out to the New York Rangers, that was the last straw for Penguins ownership.

The Pens also made big changes on the ice as well as they traded Neal to Nashville in exchange for Patric Hornqvist and Nick Spaling. Matt Niskanen and Brooks Orpik bolted for the truly greener pastures of Washington to join the Capitals. They also let Jokinen, Tanner Glass, and Joe Vitale walk in free agency.

Pittsburgh may have made the sneakiest splashes of the offseason landing former Buffalo Sabres defenseman Christian Ehrhoff and former Philadelphia Flyers forward Steve Downie on one-year deals. Blake Comeau, along with Spaling, will also help their bottom six be not as easy to push around.

PHT Morning Skate: Grabovski, Kulemin reuniting makes for good story

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

The story of how Nikolai Kulemin and Mikhail Grabovski reunited to sign with the New York Islanders is something pretty special. (Sportsnet)

Remember how crazy it seemed when Jonathan Drouin didn’t make the Tampa Bay Lightning last season? Yeah, he’s very motivated to do that this time around and that’s great news for the ‘Bolts. (Tampa Bay Times)

Is Paul Stastny throwing shade? He said he sees more opportunity with the Blues. (Post-Dispatch)

Does spending tons of money guarantee success? No, but it sure makes it look like teams are trying. (Sportsnet)

Brian Gionta signing with the Buffalo Sabres makes for a nice homecoming story for a guy who becomes a leader for a young team. (NHL.com)

Brooks Orpik and Matt Niskanen better be ready for lots of scrutiny in Washington with their big deals. (Washington Post)

Steve Downie reuniting with Rick Tocchet in Pittsburgh makes for a nice story, but his history of menacing the Penguins brings questions. (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)

What about the other guy involved in the Jason Spezza trade? Alex Chiasson hopes to emerge as a star with the Senators. (NHL.com)