Tag: retired numbers

2011 Hockey Hall Of Fame Induction

Report: Flyers will retire Mark Howe’s jersey


CSNPhilly.com’s Tim Panaccio reports that the Philadelphia Flyers will retire Mark Howe’s No. 2 jersey when the team faces the Detroit Red Wings on March 6. This comes shortly after Flyers chairman Ed Snider essentially said that if Howe was good enough to make the Hockey Hall of Fame, then it only makes sense that his number should be retired.

Howe spent 10 seasons on the Flyers’ blueline, playing well enough that Panaccio deems him the “best two-way defenseman” in franchise history. Howe was nominated for the Norris Trophy times in his career, managing to make a name for himself despite the considerable shadow cast by his father Gordie.

If that report holds true, Howe will join Bernie Parent (No. 1), Barry Ashbee (4), Bill Barber (7) and Bobby Clarke (16) as the only Flyers who have received such an honor.

Report: Devils to retire Scott Niedermayer’s number this season

Scott Niedermayer

While the New Jersey Devils haven’t confirmed the date or the decision, Tom Gulitti of Fire & Ice passes along a (since-deleted) Tweet from agent Al Dhalla that Scott Niedermayer’s number 27 will be retired next season. If Dhalla’s claims are correct, the jersey will go up into the Prudential Center’s rafters on Friday, December 16, although Gulitti makes a valid point that it might make more sense to retire his sweater when the Devils host the Anaheim Ducks (Niedermayer’s other team) on February 17.

Gulitti reports that the Devils and Niedermayer discussed the idea a bit last season too, which would make sense since Niedermayer’s No. 27 was no longer in use by fellow defenseman Mike Mottau, who awkwardly donned the number for three seasons in Niedermayer’s absence.

Niedermayer didn’t confirm the news with Gulitti, but he didn’t shoot down the rumor either. In a way it seems like an inevitable development when you consider Niedermayer’s impact on the franchise; he’s one of five players who were around for all three of the Devils’ Stanley Cup victories.

“It’s sort of a strange thing to talk about,” Niedermayer said. “If it does happen – and I guess maybe it will – it’s a great honor. But I don’t really find it my place to talk about it. It’s their decision ultimately. They’re in charge. They’re calling the shots, not me, and that’s the way it should be.”

“Lou will do it when he feels it’s right to do,” Niedermayer said. “In my eyes at least, I don’t think anything has been finalized anyway.”

When I asked Niedermayer how Dhalla might have come up with the Dec. 16 date, he replied, “There’s probably been a few dates that have been talked about and maybe that had been one of them. Whether everything has been finalized, I have no idea.”

As Puck Daddy’s Greg Wyshynski points out, the pending decision might rub some Devils fans the wrong way. There might be some Devils fans who still feel jilted over Niedermayer’s choice to sign with his brother Rob Niedermayer and the Ducks in 2005, where he would go on to win another Stanley Cup and play more excellent hockey.

In 2005, Niedermayer had a choice. He could remain a Devil via a lucrative unrestricted free-agent contract, stabilizing a franchise that was at the end of the Scott Stevens era on its blue line and entering a new trap-unfriendly era in the NHL; or, he could leave for the Anaheim Ducks’ less lucrative offer and play with this brother, Rob.

Niedermayer of course chose the latter, winning the Conn Smythe along with a Stanley Cup in 2007 and solidifying his place as a top three defenseman of his era.

The Devils? Well, if you were going to trace a line from their three-Cup mini-dynasty to their sometimes hapless years under the salary cap and new NHL rules, it begins at Niedermayer’s end in New Jersey.

To some, it might seem silly to hold a grudge on Niedermayer, especially when you take the presence of his brother Rob in Anaheim into account. Then again, others might argue that the mere act of being a fan is a bit silly, so it’s perfectly fair for some fans to smart about the choice Scott made six years ago.

The Devils and Niedermayer have eventually patched things up so it’s just be a matter of time before the team raises his number 27 up, whether that night comes on December 16, February 17 or some other time. We’ll keep an eye out for an official announcement, but how do you feel about the Devils retiring his number?

Evander Kane will wear Bobby Hull’s old number in Winnipeg

Vancouver Canucks v Atlanta Thrashers

After a little bit of confusion and some necessary communication, Evander Kane will in fact wear his #9 when the Jets open their season against the Montreal Canadiens. Of course, the uncertainty stemmed from the Thrashers moving to Winnipeg and taking on the old Jets moniker. It’s unchartered territory for a franchise to move to a city and take on a new identity—an identity that’s history was shipped to Phoenix in the 1990s. The Coyotes currently have Bobby Hull’s, Thomas Steen’s, and Dale Hawerchuk’s numbers retired. But those were all Winnipeg Jets players who retired their numbers—so it’s a little awkward when there’s a new team called the Winnipeg Jets and players who are wearing the retired numbers.

Evander Kane – a player who has worn #9 throughout his career – has treated the entire situation with class. Instead of simply assuming that he’d be able to wear the number because he’s worn it in the past, he asked the team and confirmed with Hull himself that it would be acceptable for him to continue wearing the number he’s grown up with. It’s not an instance where a young player is disrespecting the past; he understands the importance of Bobby Hull to the Winnipeg area:

“”Bobby was an outstanding player who represented the city and it’s definitely a real honour to be able to wear that number. You know, I was just checking about what the organization’s plans were for No. 9 and then this story seemed to become a lot bigger than I thought it would.”

“And I did get the feeling from a lot of people on Twitter and others that many were encouraging me to wear it.

“I’m pretty excited just to see a jersey let alone to pull one on,” Kane added with a chuckle. “It’s going to be fun for all the guys that first day in the dressing room pulling on that jersey for the first time. That opening night against the Montreal Canadiens (Oct. 9)… it’s a little bit away still, but it’s hard not to think about it. It’s going to be a real special moment in which history will be made. I can’t wait.”

Teammate Bryan Little had a similar dilemma with the #10 jersey that he wore in Atlanta. Moving to Winnipeg, he would now be wearing Dale Hawerchuk’s retired jersey. For Little, the decision was to simply change jerseys—he’ll be rocking the #18 next season. The organization told him he could do has he pleased and chose to switch numbers and avoid any potential problems.

Just because Kane went a different route doesn’t necessarily mean he made the wrong decision. The most important point was for Kane was to be respectful throughout the entire process. If he came in and acted like he was going to wear any number he wanted, it wouldn’t have mattered if Hull gave his blessing. Since Kane showed the proper respect for one of the games greats, he’s scored points with young and old fans alike.

To recap: Dale Hawerchuk’s #10 has been de facto retired by Bryan Little. Bobby Hull has told the organization that Evander Kane can wear #9. Thankfully no one on the roster wears #25 or we’d be talking to Thomas Steen to get his opinion on the matter.

Then again, they could just trade with the St. Louis Blues for Alex Steen and the whole situation would be much less awkward.