Tag: Rene Fasel

Rene Fasel

IIHF says getting NHL players to 2018 Olympics ‘will not be easy’


According to International Ice Hockey Federation president Rene Fasel, getting NHLers to participate at the 2018 Olympics “will not be easy”.

Fasel told The Associated Press that the process of consulting players and officials over a deal for the 2018 games in Pyeongchang, South Korea has begun.

“Our goal is to bring the NHL to Korea,” said Fasel adding its “long process” and “will not be easy.”

There is currently no deal in place between the IIHF, NHL and NHLPA for players to participate at the 2018 Olympics.

The story notes a deal for the 2014 games was not reached until seven months prior to the Olympics starting in Sochi, Russia.

The NHL has been sending its players to the Olympics since 1998.

Report: World Cup to be announced during all star break

Team USA's Wheeler, Oshie, Orpik and McDonagh celebrate a goal by Mcdonagh against Slovenia during the second period of their men's preliminary round ice hockey game at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics

According to TSN’s Rick Westhead the NHL and NHLPA will announce the return of the world cup of hockey during the NHL all star break, which takes place Jan. 22-26.

Westhead added one of the tweaks to the tournament will include a best-of-three final.

In November Sportsnet’s Chris Johnston reported potential changes to the format.

Rumored changes to the tournament include two all star teams in addition to the top six hockey nations (Canada, U.S., Sweden, Finland, Russia and Czech Republic).

One all star squad will be made up of the best players from Slovakia, Switzerland, Latvia, Germany and Slovenia, among others.

The make-up of the second all star team is yet to be determined.

Last month IIHF president Rene Fasel weighed in on the proposed changes.

“To be very honest, I like the idea. If we go with No. 7 and 8 with normal matching teams, we have that in the Olympics, we have that in the Canada Cup, we have that in the World Championships. Now having this selection. There’s a discussion about having European selection, it would be a great team with non-participating European teams building up a team,” said Fasel. “Then the second one is North American selection. That can be a very interesting for the hockey fans, great. That could be something. It is still an idea. There’s a rumor. We don’t know yet what they’re going to do. Personally, I like it very much.”

Fasel may like it, but players we here at PHT talked to were skeptical.

“It would be hard to play for some kind of different team, but I guess at the same time, a lot of the small countries, they’re producing really good players,” said Olli Jokinen, who’s represented Finland internationally on a number of occasions. “Players like that, a lot of time they don’t get a chance to play tournaments like that.”

Added U.S. Olympian, and Toronto Maple Leafs forward, James van Riemsdyk: “There’s more pride it in, for the players, when you’re representing your country. I think it’s fun when you have the different countries like you have every year in one of these tournaments there’s a big upset and that’s what makes it fun.

“I think it’s more fun when you have the countries (competing).”

Toronto is expected to be one the venues for the 2016 tournament.

IIHF president lukewarm on NHL players in Europe

Rene Fasel

With the lockout in full swing and NHL players heading off to Europe in droves to just play some hockey, the perspective from those across the ocean is a bit different.

IIHF President Rene Fasel is both happy to see European leagues benefit from having the biggest stars coming over, but realizes it’s tough for many who call those leagues home full time as Graham Dunbar of AP finds out.

“The integrity of the game is, for us, something very important. It’s not just business,” the world hockey leader said. “We play the game for the hockey fans, but sport should always be No. 1. Sport should also be about fairness to everybody.”

While Fasel toes the line well there, he goes on to say, “Our door is wide open,” regarding NHL players and that they’re going to play games whether they come or not. Taking advantage of the NHL’s problems just means better business for those in Europe one way or another.