Tag: qualifying offers

Dustin Brown, Mark Fayne

Devils give qualifying offer to Mark Fayne, other RFAs may not be so lucky

According to Tom Gulitti of Fire & Ice, Devils GM Lou Lamoriello has made a qualifying offer to potential restricted free agent defenseman Mark Fayne. That means New Jersey wants to keep Fayne in the fold and after how he performed through the playoffs helping to shut down some of the East’s top scorers, he’s earned that much.

Gulitti also reports that Fayne may be one of the few potential Devils RFAs to receive qualifying offers. Lamoriello didn’t say whether forwards Vladimir Zharkov and Kory Nagy, defenseman Matt Corrente, and goalie Timo Pielmeier might receive the same treatment.

Fayne is the lone one of the bunch to spend all season in New Jersey helping balance out the blue line. Fayne finished the regular season with four goals and 13 assists and added another three assists in the postseason helping the Devils reach the Stanley Cup finals.

Predators sign Sergei Kostitsyn to one-year, $2.5M deal

Sergei Kostitsyn

Sergei Kostitsyn’s last contract with the Nashville Predators was a classic example of two sides needing something and coming to a fairly easy compromise. Kostitsyn’s career was in a tailspin after some ugly times with the Montreal Canadiens; it seemed like he had one foot in the NHL and the other foot in the KHL (or worse, the minors). The Predators badly needed a creative offensive talent to accompany a roster mostly built around worker bees with defense ranking as the first thing on their minds.

Maybe Kostitsyn has some warts on his game, but there should be little doubt that the deal worked out nicely for both sides. Kostitsyn reclaimed his place as a useful NHL-level forward while the Predators benefited from far and away the best offensive output of his short career as he scored 23 goals and 50 points.

This looked like the beginning of a beautiful friendship until GM David Poile’s qualifying offer snafu threw things out of whack. Poile easily re-signed some less prominent players who didn’t receive qualifying offers on Thursday, but it seemed like the Kostitsyn situation could get messy (some might say that things tend to get messy when Sergei is involved).

Ultimately, it seems like things could have been much worse, though. The Predators reportedly signed Kostitsyn to a reasonable one-year, $2.5 million contract to avoid further headaches. That seems like a slam dunk on first impact, but one must remember that $2.5 million means far more to Nashville than it does to some of the league’s more freewheeling teams. Even so, Jeremy Gover agrees that it was an acceptable deal in the grand scheme of things.

Kostitsyn deserved a raise.

But the raise he got was a lot more substantial than what he would have gotten had the Preds filed the paperwork correctly. Any restricted free agent (with Kostitsyn’s pay scale) given a qualifying offer is set to see a 10% raise. Instead, what he got was a 450% raise.

This begs the question: is one good season worth $2.5 million? Patric Hornqvist had one good season back in 2009-10 when he scored a team high 30 goals and he was rewarded with a new three year deal worth $9.2 million total. So, if Kostitsyn signed for less than that, is it really that bad?


In the end, I’d have to say this is a good deal for Nashville. Sure, since they could’ve gotten one more season out of him at far less (had the ruling gone in the team’s favor), it stings a little. But, at the same time, given what his value would’ve been on the open market (and what Hornqvist got in a similar situation), a short-term deal at $2.5 million doesn’t seem that bad.

The best part, to me, is the term. A player like Kostitsyn might allow his mind to wander if he received a five-year contract, but dangling the carrot of another contract year in front of his face should keep him motivated through an 82-game season. The 24-year-old forward is still a ways away from unrestricted free agency, but maybe he could complete his restricted years with Nashville if he comes through in 2011-12 like he did in 2010-11.

Predators continue to work through RFA offer sheet mess, sign four players

Nashville Predators v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

General Manager David Poile and the Nashville Predators took a huge step towards solving their restricted free agent problems this offseason by coming to terms with Matt Halischuk, Nick Spaling, Chris Mueller, and Cal O’Reilly on Thursday afternoon. The four players are all in the middle of the qualifying offers dispute that has been scheduled to be heard by an arbitrator on Friday, July 8th and Wednesday July 13th. Now all that’s left of the potentially disastrous situation for Poile is one player: Sergei Kostitsyn.

Really, was there any doubt that Kostitsyn would continue to be in the middle of this mess?

For fans in Nashville, some of the best news is they didn’t have to extremely overpay any of the players in question. From the Nashville Predators official release:

Nashville Predators President of Hockey Operations/General Manager David Poile announced today that the club has signed forwards Matt Halischuk and Nick Spaling to two-year contracts, and forwards Chris Mueller and Cal O’Reilly to one-year deals. Halischuk’s contract is worth $1.425 million, paying him $600,000 in 2011-12 and $825,000 in 2012-13 while Spaling’s contract is worth $2.1 million, paying him $1 million in 2011-12 and $1.1 million in 2012-13. O’Reilly’s contract will see him earn $1.05 million in 2011-12 and Mueller’s two-way contract will see him paid $550,000 at the NHL level and $65,000 at the AHL level.


Yes, each player received a little more than they would have if they were in a normal restricted free agency situation. The worst fears were that they’d have to grossly overpay like Dale Tallon and the Blackhawks were forced to do with their restricted free agents in 2009 when they had problems faxing the offers in a timely manner. They ended up overpaying their six restricted free agents to the extent that none of the players are still with the organization. For that matter, the GM lost his job as well.

David Poile has done his best to rectify a tough situation, but the heavy lifting is still ahead of him. It’s no secret that the Predators are a playoff contender that gets the job done with great defense and stellar netminding. Unfortunately, their weakness is both skill and depth amongst the forward unit. By signing Halischuk, Spaling, and O’Reilly the Predators have locked up three forwards NHL forwards for next season to address the depth. But in the skill of Kostitsyn, the Predators still need to lock up their best offensive player from a season ago.

…he’s taken some of the anxiety out of the air, but Sergei Kostitsyn is perhaps the most critical of the bunch, a winger fit in reasonably well in a prominent role. Even if his goal-scoring in 2010-11 was fluky (which it was), he could be a 40-50 point guy if he plays on a major line all season, and the Predators are painfully short of such talent.


Obviously it’s important for a team to re-sign their best offensive producer. But for a team like the Predators that is already struggling to find high level scorers, it’s critical to their success. Kostitsyn led the Predators with 23 goals and 50 points a season ago (tied with Martin Erat). The numbers may not jump off the score sheet to the average fan—but those are the best they have in Nashville. Take him out of the line-up and a weak offensive team becomes that much weaker. The team would be able to take the money from his contract pursue another free agent, but who would they sign at this point in the offseason? It’s no secret that there aren’t many decent free agents left on the open market.

It would be easiest for the Predators to reach an agreement before the arbitrator hears the NHLPA’s grievance over the next few days. If they can’t reach an agreement and Kostitsyn wins his case, he’d become an unrestricted free agent available to all 30 teams.

We’ll keep you posted as the story continues to develop.